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Community contributions to MariaDB

One of the goals of the MariaDB Foundation is to help new contributors understand the source code and to lower the barrier for new participants. One way to measure this is to look at the number of pull requests received and accepted, as these mostly reflect community contributions. The figures below are for the main […]

The post Community contributions to MariaDB appeared first on MariaDB.org.

My First Steps with MariaDB ColumnStore

This is a "Howto" kind of post, and some speculations and historical references aside, it will show you how to build MariaDB ColumnStore (current version 1.0.9) from GitHub source, how to install and configure it for basic usage, as well as how to resolve some minor problems you may get in the process. Keep reading and eventually you'll get the real Howto below :)

* * *
I try not to care about any software issues besides good old MySQL, InnoDB storage engine internals, query optimization and some MyRocks or a little bit of …

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Practical Orchestrator, BoF, GitHub and other talks at Percona Live 2017

Next week I will be presenting Practical Orchestrator at Percona Live, Santa Clara.

As opposed to previous orchestrator talks I gave, and which were either high level or algorithmic talks, Practical Orchestrator will be, well... practical.

The objective for this talk is that attendees leave the classroom with a good grasp of orchestrator's powers, and know how to set up orchestrator in their environment.

We will walk through discovery, refactoring, recovery, HA. I will walk through the most important configuration settings, share advice on what makes a good deployment, and tell you how we and others run orchestrator. We'll present a few scripting/automation examples. We will literally set up …

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My First Steps with MariaDB 10.2 and RocksDB Storage Engine

Last year I started to explore MyRocks, that is, RocksDB used as a storage engine with MySQL. So far I had to use Facebook's MySQL 5.6 to do this. I could try to use some specific development branches of MariaDB (or maybe even Percona Server) for this, but I preferred to wait until the engine is included into a main branch by the company I work for. Recently this happened, and now you can get RocksDB loaded and working in main MariaDB 10.2 branch. In this blog post I am going to explain how to build it from source and do some basic checks.

I was updating my MariaDB local repository on my Ubuntu 14.04 netbook, with 10.2 branch already checked out (do git checkout 10.2 if …

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PHP-SQL-Parser updated with pull requests

I took some time this morning to check out and merge some existing pull requests for PHP-SQL-Parser, the most popular SQL parser for MySQL and PHP.

I'm thinking about adding a Validate($conn,$sql) method to the parser to validate the syntax of the SQL against the given MySQL database.

How to Manually Build Percona Server for MySQL RPM Packages

In this blog, we’ll look at how to manually build Percona Server for MySQL RPM packages.

Several customers and other people from the open source community have asked us how they could make their own Percona Server for MySQL RPM binaries from scratch.

This request is often made by companies that want to add custom patches to our release. To do this, you need to make some modifications to the

percona-server.spec

 file in the source tree, and some preparation is necessary.

This post covers how you can make your own RPMs from GIT or source tarball so that you can build RPMs from your own modified branch, or by applying patches. In this example, we’ll build Percona Server 5.7.16-10.

Making your own RPMs is not a recommended practice, and should rarely be …

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Introducing gh-ost: triggerless online schema migrations

I'm thoroughly happy to introduce gh-ost: triggerless, controllable, auditable, testable, trusted online schema change tool released today by GitHub.

gh-ost now powers our production schema migrations. We hit some serious limitations using pt-online-schema-change on our large volume, high traffic tables, to the effect of driving our database to a near grinding halt or even to the extent of causing outages. With gh-ost, we are now able to migrate our busiest tables at any time, peak hours and heavy workloads included, without causing impact to our service.

gh-ost supports testing in production. It goes a long …

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The fastest MySQL Sandbox setup ever!

MySQL-Sandbox 3.1.11 introduces a new utility, different from anything I have put before in the MySQL Sandbox toolkit.

make_sandbox_from_url downloads a tiny MySQL tarball from a repository and install it straight away.

As of today, the following packages are available

Major release versions package size
(what you download)
expanded size
(storage used)
original size
(not included)
5.0 5.0.96 20M 44M 371M
5.1
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Building MaxScale 1.4.2 from GitHub on Fedora 23

MariaDB MaxScale is mentioned in many blog posts recently. It's Application of the Year 2016 after all! I'd like to test it, follow posts like this etc, all that on my favorite and readily available testing platforms that are now Ubuntu of all kinds and, surely, Fedora 23 (on my wife's workstation, the most powerful hardware at hand).

My old habits force me to build open source software I test from source, and I do not want to even discuss the topic of "MaxScale binaries availability" that was quite "popular" some time ago. So, after building MaxScale 1.4.1 on CentOS …

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MySQL Sandboxes in Docker

Overview

When I got interested in Docker, I started playing idly with the idea of integrating containers and MySQL Sandbox. My first experiments were not encouraging. Using a container the same way I would use a regular server produced horrible results. I started by creating a Debian or CentOS container, installing MySQL Sandbox, and then importing an expanded tarball into the container. What happens is that tarballs of recent MySQL versions expand to roughly 2 GB of binaries. When you try to put that into a container you get a bloated file system. If you want to expand more than one tarball, you get an enormous unusable blob that is contrary to what containers should be used for. There is, of course, the possibility of using volumes, which would avoid the problem of making the container …

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