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Displaying posts with tag: packaging (reset)
Omnibus as a Solution for Python Dependency Hell

Python has always been an exemplar of good coding style for me. It’s impressive how concise unit tests can be, how flexible mocks are. Really, it’s a great pleasure to write Python code. Up until the point when you need to deploy it. From then on you embark on a rollercoaster to go through a […]

The post Omnibus as a Solution for Python Dependency Hell appeared first on TwinDB.

Complete Megalist: 25 Helpful Tools For Back-End Developers

 

The website or mobile app is the storefront for participating in the modern digital era. It’s your portal for inviting users to come and survey your products and services. Much attention focuses on front-end development; this is where the HMTL5, CSS, and JavaScript are coded to develop the landing page that everyone sees when they visit your site.

 

But the real magic happens on the backend. This is the ecosystem that really powers your website. One writer has articulated this point very nicely as follows:

 

The technology and programming that “power” a site—what your end user doesn’t see but what makes the site run—is called the back end. Consisting of the server, the database, and the server-side applications, it’s the behind-the-scenes functionality—the brain of a site. …

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Debian 9 and MySQL: Watch Out!

Debian logo by Software in the Public Interest, Inc. (CC-BY-SA) MySQL and Debian 9 “Stretch” Debian 9 (“Stretch”) was released on June 17, and we congratulate the Debian community on another iteration of a central Linux distro. Now, the Debian release team some time ago decided not to ship MySQL as part of the distro, instead replacing it […]

Give me a MySQL and Make it Snappy!

MySQL is available for a huge variety of platforms, in a wide range of packaging formats and through many channels. Part of our mission is to keep up with the times by making sure that all MySQL products are available where people expect and need them to be. As part of that we have invested […]

Building RPM on Travis-CI in Docker containers

Travis-CI is a crucial component in Continuous Integration/Continuous Deployment. We use it a lot to run unit tests and building/uploading Python modules. Recently I had to solve a problem of building RPMs on Travis-CI with Docker containers. In this post I will describe step-by-step how to do that. We distribute our backup tool as RPM packages […]

The post Building RPM on Travis-CI in Docker containers appeared first on TwinDB.

Trying out MySQL in Docker Swarm Mode

Orchestration tools are often used when scaling out an application stack. In a Docker environment, tools like Kubernetes, Mesos and Docker Swarm have typically been used for this purpose. Docker has brought significant updates to their orchestration offering with their latest release. In this blog post, we’ll give a contextual overview of the orchestration features offered in […]

MySQL Debian/Ubuntu packaging sprint

Debian/Ubuntu packaging sprint participants. From left: James Page, Norvald H. Ryeng, George Lorch, Akhil Mohan, Otto Kekäläinen, Robie Basak.

Last week, Canonical invited the MySQL packaging team in Debian to a packaging sprint in their London office, and most of us were able to participate. We’ve met online on IRC and UOSs before, but this was the first time we were all in the same room.

The results of our sprint will soon be available in a .deb near you. Since Debian Jessie is currently in feature freeze, most of it will hit Ubuntu first. The two main things we achieved on the MySQL side were to make MySQL 5.6 ready for Ubuntu Vivid (15.04) and to split MySQL, Percona and MariaDB configuration files. The configuration file split …

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MariaDB 10.0 reference card: plugins in packages

MariaDB 10.0 comes with ~50 engines and plugins; and it comes in 35 package sets (34 binary ones and a source tarball).

Every day people come asking on #maria IRC whether a package X contains an engine Y, or saying that it doesn’t, or wondering if it should. Remembering all combinations isn’t easy, and it became impractical to study build logs or package contents every time, so I ended up with a cheat sheet for 10.0.10 GA. At the very least it should help me to answer those questions; even better if somebody else finds it useful.

The tables below refer to contents of packages provided at downloads.mariadb.org or at MariaDB repository mirrors. Packages built by distributions might have different contents and are not covered here.

Legend

— built-in (also known as static):
the plugin comes as a part of the server binary. It can be disabled or enabled by default, but even when it is disabled, it is …

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MySQL RPMS and the new yum repository

I was really pleased to see the announcement by Oracle MySQL yum repositories that they have now produced a yum repository from where the MySQL RPMs they provide can be downloaded. This makes keeping up to date much easier. Many companies setup internal yum repositories with the software they need as then updating servers is much easier and can be done with a simple command. For many people at home that means you set this up once and don’t need to check for updates and do manual downloads, but can do a quick yum update xxxx and you get the latest version. Great!  This new yum repository only covers RHEL6 did not include RHEL5 which is not yet end of life and still used by me and probably quite a lot of other people. I filed bug#70773 to ask for RHEL5 support to be …

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On operating system upgrades and a packager’s nightmare

A fairy tale

Once upon a time I did an operating system upgrade, a minor one that should do no harm, but just get me up to date by fixing any bugs in the version I had been using. It seemed like a good idea.

All seemed to be fine. I use a package provided by an external vendor and not the one produced by the operating system provider as this vendor provides a newer version of the package and I need that. The vendor has to make his package fit in the os environment his package is built for and normally does a pretty good job.

I use automation to build my systems and when I built a new one some issues appeared. Related to the new version of the OS the provider had enhanced one of his packages and the installation pulled in new dependencies. The install of the external package I use then broke as it conflicted with the new dependency provided by the OS.  While a workaround is possible: uninstall …

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