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Displaying posts with tag: Performance (reset)
Probability perspective on MySQL Group replication and Galera Cluster

Comparing Oracle MySQL Group Replication and Galera Cluster through a probability perpective seems quite interesting.

At commit time both use a group certification process that requires network round trips. The required time for these network roundtrips is what will mainly determined the cost of a transaction. Let us try to compute an estimate of the [...]

MySQL Marinate – So you want to learn MySQL! – START HERE

Want to learn or refresh yourself on MySQL? MySQL Marinate is the FREE virtual self-study group is for you!

MySQL Marinate quick links if you know what it is all about.

This is for beginners – If you have no experience with MySQL, or if you are a developer that wants to learn how to administer MySQL, or an administrator that wants to learn how to query MySQL, this course is what you want. If you are not a beginner, you will likely still learn some nuances, and it will be easy and fast to do. If you have absolutely zero experience with MySQL, this is perfect for you. The first few chapters walk you through getting and installing MySQL, so all you need is a computer and the book.

The format of a virtual self-study group is as follows:
Each participant acquires the same textbook ( …

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Cost/Benefit Analysis of a MySQL Index

We all know that if we add a MySQL index to speed up a read, we end up making writes slower. How often do we do the analysis to look at how much more work is done?

Recently, a developer came to me and wanted to add an index to a very large table (hundreds of gigabytes) to speed up a query. We did some testing on a moderately used server:

Set long_query_time to 0 and turn slow query logging on
Turn slow query logging off after 30 minutes.

Add the index (was on a single field)

Repeat the slow query logging for 30 minutes at a similar time frame (in our case, we did middle of the day usage on a Tuesday and Wednesday, when the database is heavily used).

Then I looked at the write analysis – there were no DELETEs, no UPDATEs that updated the indexed field, and no UPDATEs that used the indexed field in the filtering. There were only INSERTs, and with the help of pt-query-digest, here’s what I found: …

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Faster Node Rejoins with Improved IST performance

In this blog, we’ll look at how improvements to Percona XtraDB Cluster improved IST performance.

Introduction

Starting in version 5.7.17-29.20 of Percona XtraDB Cluster significantly improved performance. Depending on the workload, the increase in throughput is in the range of 3-10x. (More details here). These optimization fixes also helped improve IST (Incremental State Transfer) performance. This blog is aimed at studying the IST impact.

IST

IST stands for incremental state transfer. When a node of the cluster leaves the cluster for a short period of time and then rejoins the cluster it needs to catch-up with cluster state. As part of this sync …

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Query Reviews (part 2): pt-query-digest

Query reviews (part 1): Overview

The 1st post in the series gave an overview of what a query review is and the value they can bring you. So now let’s talk about how one is done, specifically, how to do a query review using pt-query-digest.

The point of a query review is that it is a comprehensive review of queries. Imagine if you could get a list of all queries that run on your system, and then you systematically looked at each query to determine if it is optimized. That is the basic concept behind a query review.

So, how do you get a list of queries?

pt-query-digest can use a slow query log, binary log, general log or tcpdump. I usually use a slow query log with long_query_time set to 0, so I can capture all the …

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Quick look: Memory usage aspects and connection management best practices in Aurora and MySQL

Next up in the "quick look" series is a discussion of connection management best practices and the memory usage implications of idle connections in Aurora and MySQL. I'll also throw in some notes on how to configure your connection pools to avoid unpleasant surprises.

Thread handling in Aurora vs MySQL Community MySQL editions use "one-thread-per-connection" approach to thread handling. It means that each individual user connection receives a dedicated OS thread within the mysqld process. This comes with issues, such as: 

  • Relatively high memory usage with large number of user connections, even if the connections are completely idle.
  • Higher internal server contention and context switching overhead when working with thousands of user connections.

To avoid such issues, some servers support a thread pool approach. Examples include Percona Server and Amazon Aurora.

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ClickHouse in a General Analytical Workload (Based on a Star Schema Benchmark)

In this blog post, we’ll look at how ClickHouse performs in a general analytical workload using the star schema benchmark test.

We have mentioned ClickHouse in some recent posts (ClickHouse: New Open Source Columnar Database, Column Store Database Benchmarks: MariaDB ColumnStore vs. Clickhouse vs. Apache Spark), where it showed excellent results. ClickHouse by itself seems to be event-oriented RDBMS, as its name suggests (clicks). Its primary purpose, using Yandex Metrica (the system similar to Google Analytics), also points to an event-based nature. We also can see there is …

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Why does the MySQL optimizer not do what I think it should?

In May, I presented two talks – one called “Are you getting the best out of your indexes?” and “Optimizing Queries Using EXPLAIN”. I now have slides and video for both of them.

The first talk about indexing should probably be titled “Why is MySQL doing this?!!?!!?” It gives insight into why the MySQL optimizer chooses indexes that you do not expect; especially when it does not use an index you expect it to.

The talk has something for everyone – for beginners it explains B-trees and how they work, and for the more seasoned DBA it explains concepts like average value group size, and how the optimizer uses those concepts applied to metadata to make decisions.

Slides are at http://technocation.org/files/doc/2017_05_MySQLindexes.pdf.
Click the slide image below to go to the video at …

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MySQL Support Engineer's Chronicles, Issue #6

Previous post in series was published almost 4 months ago, but I do not plan to end it. So, let me quickly discuss some of problems I worked on or was interested in so far in June, and provide some useful links.

Back on June 2 I had to find out what exact files are created by MariaDB's ColumnStore when I create a table in this storage engine. Actually in recent versions one can check the tables in the INFORMATION_SCHEMA, but if still wonders why are all these directories with numbers in the names (/usr/local/mariadb/columnstore/data1/000.dir/000.dir/011.dir/193.dir/000.dir/FILE000.cdf), please, check also this …

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Quick look: DDL performance on MySQL vs Aurora with and without Fast DDL

In this part of the "quick look" series, I evaluate the performance of DDL operations in Amazon Aurora and vanilla MySQL. I'll use a few examples to demonstrate how fast the DDLs run and what impact they can have on regular workload. I'll also take the Aurora's Fast DDL feature for a spin.

Introduction DDL operations are a well-known source of pain in MySQL-based environments. They are not very fast, they're not fully online (non-blocking), and they're difficult to run on top of regular workload without serious performance degradation. MySQL has not seen much improvement in this area for quite some time, which is we have tools such as pt-online-schema-change, now considered to be an industry standard rather than a workaround.
Amazon Aurora tries to shake things up a little bit with the Fast DDL feature, which (as of this writing) allows you to add a nullable column at the end of a table nearly instantaneously. You can …

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