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Displaying posts with tag: innodb (reset)
Announcement: Experimental Build of Percona XtraBackup 8.0

Experimental Build of Percona XtraBackup 8.0 released

An experimental alpha version of Percona XtraBackup 8.0.1 is now available in the Percona experimental software repositories.

A few things to note about this release:

  • We removed the deprecated innobackupex in this release
  • Due to the new MySQL redo log and data dictionary formats the Percona XtraBackup 8.0.x versions will only be compatible with MySQL 8.0.x and the upcoming Percona Server for MySQL 8.0.x
  • For experimental migrations from earlier database server versions, you will need to …
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Scaling IO-Bound Workloads for MySQL in the Cloud

Is increasing GP2 volumes size or increasing IOPS for IO1 volumes a valid method for scaling IO-Bound workloads? In this post I’ll focus on one question: how much can we improve performance if we use faster cloud volumes? This post is a continuance of previous cloud research posts:

To recap, in Amazon EC2 we can use gp2 and io1 volumes. gp2 performance can be scaled with size, i.e for gp2 volume size of 500GB we get 1500 iops; size 1000GB – 3000 iops; and for 3334GB – 10000 iops (maximal …

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Configuring InnoDB Thread Concurrency for Performance

InnoDB depends on operating system threads to process the requests from user transactions, These transactions include requests to InnoDB before commit or rollback. The modern operating systems and servers with multi-core processors, where context switching is efficient, most workloads run well without any limit on the number of concurrent threads. InnoDB can efficiently control the number of concurrently executing operating system threads (and thus the number of requests that are processed at any one time) to minimize context switching between threads. if the number of threads concurrently executing is at a pre-defined limit, the new request sleeps for a short time before it tries again. The requests which cannot be rescheduled after the sleep is put in a first-in/first-out queue and eventually is processed. Threads waiting for locks are not counted in the number of concurrently executing threads.To limit the number of …

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Upgrading MySQL to 8.0.12 with Audit plugin.

As a spin-off from the previous post, https://mysqlmed.wordpress.com/2018/08/23/get-the-auditors-in/, I thought that it would be good to see how well the Audit plugin upgrades to MySQL 8. The big change in auditing is that the tables change from MyISAM to InnoDB, so keep your eyes open.

I’m using the previously used instance in version 5.7.18.

Preparation

Before we do anything, let’s make sure auditing will be in place when we restart the instance with 8.0.12:

Uncomment the plugin-load & audit-log params we had originally commented out. After all, this is something we should have done in the last post (apologies!):

vi my_audit.cnf:
  ..
  [mysqld]
  plugin-load =audit_log.so
  audit-log =FORCE_PLUS_PERMANENT
  ..

Restart the 5.7 instance so we upgrade from a rebooted / ‘as real as can be …

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Get the Auditors in: MySQL Enterprise Audit.

Here I have been looking into using the MySQL Enterprise Edition Audit Log plugin for 5.7. We have many options to audit (filters, encryption, compression, Workbench, rotation & purging, viewing the log, etc.) and it’s quite clear cut on what we’re auditing and not when active.

If you’re looking to go deep into the Audit Plugin, as part of the Enterprise Edition, you’ll want to look at the following Support note:

Master Note for MySQL Enterprise Audit Log Plugin (Doc ID 2299419.1)

And if you’re looking for other Audit Plugin examples, I’d recommend Tony Darnell’s blog post:

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Question about Semi-Synchronous Replication: the Answer with All the Details

I was recently asked a question by mail about MySQL Lossless Semi-Synchronous Replication. As I think the answer could benefit many people, I am answering it in a blog post. The answer brings us to the internals of transaction committing, of semi-synchronous replication, of MySQL (server) crash recovery, and of storage engine (InnoDB) crash recovery. I am also debunking some misconceptions that I have often seen and heard repeated by many. Let’s start by stating one of those misconceptions.

One of those misconceptions is the following (this is NOT true): semi-synchronous enabled slaves are always the most up-to-date slaves (again, this is NOT true). If you hear it yourself, then please call people out on it to avoid this spreading more. Even if some slaves have semi-synchronous replication disabled (I will use semi-sync for …

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ProxySQL Series : Percona Cluster/MariaDB Cluster (Galera) Read-write Split

ProxySQL is the most preferred and is widely used for load-balancing MySQL workload, thanks to Rene Cannon & Team for the great tool, and kudos on the recent release of ProxySQL 1.4.10, with a lot of bug fixes. ProxySQL is simple in design, lightweight, highly efficient and feature rich, We have been working with ProxySQL in production for our client quite a sometime, we have also shared some of our encounters/experience and use cases in the below blogs.

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On Fine MySQL Manual

Today I am going to provide some details on the last item in my list of problems with Oracle's way of MySQL server development, maintenance of MySQL Manual. I stated that:
"MySQL Manual still have many details missing and is not fixed fast enough.
Moreover, it is not open source...
"Let me explain the above:

  1. MySQL Reference Manual is not open source. It used to be built from DocBook XML sources. Probably that's still the case. But you can not find the source code in open repositories (please, correct me if I am wrong, I tried to search...) That's because it is NOT open source. It says this clearly in …
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MySQL Performance : 8.0 on IO-bound OLTP_RW vs Percona Server 5.7

This article is inspired by Percona blog post comparing MySQL 8.0 and Percona Server 5.7 on IO-bound workload with Intel Optane storage. There are several claims made by Vadim based on a single test case, which is simply unfair. So, I'll try to clarify this all based on more test results and more tech details..
But before we start, some intro :
InnoDB Parallel Flushing -- was introduced with MySQL 5.7 (as a single-thread flushing could no more follow), and implemented as dedicated parallel threads (cleaners) which are involved in background once per second to do LRU-driven flushing first (in case there is no more or too low amount of free pages) and then REDO-driven flushing (to flush …

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InnoDB Progress Information

Tweet

MySQL has since version 5.7 had support for progress information for some queries. As promised in my previous post, I will here discuss how you can use that to get progress information for ALTER TABLE on InnoDB tables.

Background and Setup

Progress information is implemented through the Performance Schema using the stage events. In version 8.0.12 there are currently seven stages that can provide this information for  ALTER TABLE statements on InnoDB tables. In MySQL 8, it is easy to list the stages capable of reporting progress information by using the

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