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Displaying posts with tag: innodb (reset)
InnoDB Page Compression: the Good, the Bad and the Ugly

In this blog post, we’ll look at some of the facets of InnoDB page compression.

Somebody recently asked me about the best way to handle JSON data compression in MySQL. I took a quick look at InnoDB page compression and wanted to share my findings.

There is also some great material on this topic that was prepared and presented by Yura Sorokin at Percona Live Europe 2017: https://www.percona.com/live/e17/sessions/percona-xtradb-compressed-columns-with-dictionaries-an-alternative-to-innodb-table-compression. Yura also implemented …

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Fun with Bugs #57 - On MySQL Bug Reports I am Subscribed to, Part I

I've decided to stop reviewing MySQL Release Notes in this series, but it does not mean that I am not interested in MySQL bugs any more. At the moment I am subscribed to 91 active MySQL bugs reported by other MySQL users, and in this blog post I am going to present 15 of them, the most recently reported ones. I'd really want to see them fixed or at least properly processed as soon as possible.

In some cases I am going to add my speculations on how the bug had better be handled, or maybe highlight some important details about it. It is not my job any more to process/"verify" any community bug reports for any kind of MySQL, but I did that for many years and I've spent more than 5 years "on the other side", being a member of Community, so in some cases I let myself to share some strong opinion on what may be done …

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InnoDB Cluster: setting up Production… for disaster! (2/2)

Ok, so now we’re got our InnoDB Cluster a-clustering, MySQL Router a-routing, now we need some disaster to be a-disaster-recovering…

A foreword first.

If you’re looking to use Enterprise Backup to recover a single node and restore that node back into an existing InnoDB Cluster, LeFred takes you through that one nicely here.

Preparing for backup

On our single primary server, the one that allows write, which was ic2/10.0.0.12 in my case:

mysql -uroot -poracle << EOF 
SET sql_log_bin = OFF; 
 create user 'backup'@'%' identified by 'oracle';
 grant all on *.* to 'backup'@'%';
SET sql_log_bin = ON; 
EOF

Let’s create something to backup (if you haven’t already done so of course):

mysqlsh --uri …
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InnoDB Cluster: setting up Production… for disaster! (1/2)

Want to setup InnoDB Cluster and be prepared for a Disaster Recovery scenario? Get ready:

Here’s a way to set up InnoDB Cluster using the 3 environments, on Oracle Linux 7.2, 5.7.19 MySQL Commercial Server, MySQL Shell 8.0.3 DMR, MySQL Router. As this is the first blog post for a complete disaster recovery scenario of InnoDB Cluster, we’ll also be installing MySQL Enterprise Backup.

If you’re new to InnoDB Cluster then I’d highly recommend looking at the following to understand how it works and what Group Replication, Shell & Router are.:

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MySQL vs. MariaDB: Reality Check

In this blog, we’ll provide a comparison between MySQL vs. MariaDB (including Percona Server for MySQL).

Introduction

The goal of this blog post is to evaluate, at a higher level, MySQL, MariaDB and Percona Server for MySQL side-by-side to better inform the decision making process. It is largely an unofficial response to published comments from the MariaDB Corporation.

It is worth noting that Percona Server for MySQL is a drop-in compatible branch of MySQL, where Percona contributes as much as possible upstream. MariaDB Server, on the other hand, is a fork of MySQL 5.5. They cherry-picked MySQL features, and don’t guarantee …

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Top Performance Metrics to Monitor on MySQL (Connections & Buffer Pool Usage)

As a DBA, your top priority is to keep your databases and dependent applications running smoothly at all times. To this end, your best weapon is judicious monitoring of key performance metrics. In a perfect world, you’d want to be up-to-date regarding every aspect of your database’s activity – i.e. how many events occurred, how big they were, precisely when they happened and how long they took.

There certainly is no shortage of tools that can monitor resource consumption, provide instantaneous status snapshots, and generate wait analysis and graphs. The challenge is that some metrics can be expensive to measure, and, perhaps even more importantly, they can require a lot of work to analyze.

The purpose of Part-2 of the blog series is to narrow down the field to those performance metrics that provide the most value for the effort as well as present some tangible ways to capture and study them. It is by tracking the most useful …

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MySQL Dashboard Improvements in Percona Monitoring and Management 1.4.0

In this blog post, I’ll walk through some of the improvements to the Percona Monitoring and Management (PMM) MySQL dashboard in release 1.4.0.

As the part of Percona Monitoring and Management development, we’re constantly looking for better ways to visualize information and help you to spot and resolve problems faster. We’ve made some updates to the MySQL dashboard in the 1.4.0 release. You can see those improvements in action in our Percona Monitoring and Management Demo Site: check out the MySQL Overview and …

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Fun with Bugs #56 - On Some Public Bugs Fixed in MySQL 5.7.20

While MySQL 8.0.x hardly has much impact on my regular work, recent MySQL 5.7.20 release is something to check carefully. MySQL 5.7 is widely used in production, as a base for Percona Server 5.7, some features may be merged into MariaDB 10.x etc. So, here is my review of some community reported bugs that were fixed in recently released MySQL 5.7.20, based on the release notes.

Usually I start with InnoDB bug fixes, but in 5.7.20 several related fixes were made only to bugs reported internally. So, this time I have to start with partitioning:

  • Bug #86255 - First one to write about, and the bug report is …
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A crashing bug in MySQL: the CREATE TABLE of death (more fun with InnoDB Persistent Statistics)

I ended one of my last posts - Fun with InnoDB Persistent Statistics - with a cryptic sentence: there is more to say about this but I will stop here for now.  What I did not share at the time is the existence of a crashing bug somehow related to what I found.  But let's start with some context.

In Bug#86926, I found a way to put more than 64 characters in the field table_name of the

How to Choose the MySQL innodb_log_file_size

In this blog post, I’ll provide some guidance on how to choose the MySQL innodb_log_file_size.

Like many database management systems, MySQL uses logs to achieve data durability (when using the default InnoDB storage engine). This ensures that when a transaction is committed, data is not lost in the event of crash or power loss.

MySQL’s InnoDB storage engine uses a fixed size (circular) Redo log space. The size is controlled by innodb_log_file_size and innodb_log_files_in_group (default 2). You multiply those values and get the Redo log space that available to use. While technically it shouldn’t matter whether you change either the innodb_log_file_size or innodb_log_files_in_group variable to control the Redo space size, most people just work with the innodb_log_file_size and leave innodb_log_files_in_group alone.

Configuring …

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