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Displaying posts with tag: innodb (reset)
Percona XtraBackup Point-In-Time Recovery for the Single Database

Recovering to a particular time in the past is called Point-In-Time Recovery (PITR). With PITR you can rollback unwanted DELETE without WHERE clause or any other harmful command.

PITR with Percona XtraBackup is pretty straightforward and perfectly described in the user manual. You need to restore the data from the backup, then apply all binary logs created or updated after the backup was taken, but skip harmful event(s).

However, if your data set is large you may want to recover only the affected database or table. This is possible but you need to be smart when filtering events from the binary log. In this post, I will show how to perform such a partial recovery using Percona XtraBackup, …

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MySQL ERROR Log Table Explained

Over the decades we have been reading the MySQL error log from the server system file, if there are any issues in MySQL or any unknown restart happened , generally we look at the mysql error log.

By default MySQL error log can be found in the default path /var/log/mysqld.log , or it can be explicitly configured using the variable log_error.

Few drawbacks using MySQL error log as FILE

  • Possibility of missing genuine errors while reading lengthy information.
  • Filtering of errors for the particular date and timeframes.
  • Cannot provide the DB server access to developers because of fear of mishandling DB servers.

To overcome the above issues , from MySQL …

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6 Step MySQL Point-In-Time recovery on AWS RDS

Recently one of our customers ran into an issue, wherein a bad actor(code) from the application had made the wrong update to 16 M records of a critical table in the database, causing the entire production process to go down. The application Team was able to find the bad actor and block it, our Remote DBA was involved in the Data Recovery/Rollback.

Here I would like to discuss possible recovery methods for the above said scenario

Delayed Slave:

A simple and effective way to recover is by using a delayed slave, RDS started supporting this feature from version 5.6.40 and 5.7.22 i.e., you can induce a SQL thread delay-interval for applying the writes to a slave, detailed implementation is covered in our blog here. It’s …

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Webinar Summary: Migrate your EOL MySQL Servers

This brief summarises the proceedings and outcomes of the 2nd MyWebinar which was held on 13th February 2021 at Online Webinar. As part of our thought leadership webinar series, our latest hosting webinar Migrate your EOL MySQL Servers (seamless migration to MySQL group replication / InnoDB cluster)

We have conducted MyWebinar with a very positive response with the help of software like zoom hosting arrangement and YouTube streaming and commitment of our business team, We have easily planned the perfect broadcasting for all of the attendees.

Over 30+ people took part in our webinar on 13th Feb 2021, to learn MySQL EOL and upgrade path. The session “Migrate your EOL MySQL servers to HA Complaint GR Cluster / InnoDB Cluster With Zero Downtime” by  …

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Various Types of InnoDB Transaction Isolation Levels Explained Using Terminal

The goal of this blog post is to explain the various types of transaction isolation levels available in MySQL. After reading the blog, you will be able to explain dirty reads, non-repeatable reads, and the concept of phantom rows as well.

What is the Isolation Level in MySQL?

Isolation (I) is one of the properties from ACID. It defines how each transaction is isolated from other transactions and is a critical component of application design. As per the SQL:1992 standard, InnoDB has four types of Isolation levels. Below, I have listed the types in order, and each transaction isolation level provides better consistency compared to the previous one.

  • READ-UNCOMMITTED
  • READ-COMMITTED
  • REPEATABLE-READ – ( MySQL’s DEFAULT )
  • SERIALIZABLE

You can change the isolation level using the variable “transaction_isolation” at runtime. As transaction isolation changes can …

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The MySQL Clone Wars: Plugin vs. Percona XtraBackup

Large replication topologies are quite common nowadays, and this kind of architecture often requires a quick method to rebuild a replica from another server.

The Clone Plugin, available since MySQL 8.0.17, is a great feature that allows cloning databases out of the box. It is easy to rebuild a replica or to add new nodes to a cluster using the plugin. Before the release of the plugin, the best open-source alternative was Percona XtraBackup for MySQL Databases.

In this blog post, we compare both alternatives for cloning purposes. If you need to perform backups, Percona XtraBackup is a better tool as it supports compression and incremental backups, among other features not provided by the plugin. The plugin supports compression only for network transmission, not for storage.

But one of the plugin’s strong points is simplicity. …

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InnoDB Clone and page tracking

First we will talk about some of the other internal users of the technology that underpins the InnoDB Clone. MySQL Enterprise Backup (MEB) is an enterprise offering that provides backup and recovery for MySQL. Among various types of backups available, the following two types are of interest to us:

  • Full Backup – A backup that backs up the entire MySQL instance – all the tables in each MySQL database.

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MySQL 101: Tuning MySQL After Upgrading Memory

In this post, we will discuss what to do when you add more memory to your instance. Adding memory to a server where MySQL is running is common practice when scaling resources.

First, Some Context

Scaling resources is just adding more resources to your environment, and this can be split in two main ways: vertical scaling and horizontal scaling.

Vertical scaling is increasing hardware capacity for a given instance, thus having a more powerful server, while horizontal scaling is adding more servers, a pretty standard approach for load balancing and sharding.

As traffic grows, working datasets are getting bigger, and thus we start to suffer because the data that doesn’t fit into memory has to be retrieved from disk. This is a costly operation, even with modern NVME drives, so at some point, we will need to deal with either of the scaling solutions we mentioned.

In this case, we will discuss adding more …

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Efficient Use Of Indexes In MySQL

These are the slides of the “Efficient Use Of Indexes In MySQL” talk we delivered on the SFMySQL Meetup.

This is an introductory talk for developers on MySQL indexes. In my opinion, it’s quite important to understand how InnoDB organizes data. If you know how MySQL accesses data, it’s easier to write optimal queries.

When working with queries, I imagine secondary indexes as a table with records sorted by secondary key fields. This is a powerful concept that helps to understand the MySQL logic. It’s also easy to understand complex optimizations like loose index scan.

For example, for index (last_name, rank) the secondary index table looks like:

Enjoy the slides!

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More on Checkpoints in InnoDB MySQL 8

Recently I posted about checkpointing in MySQL, where MySQL showed interesting “wave” behavior.

Soon after Dimitri posted a solution with how to fix “waves,” and I would like to dig a little more into proposed suggestions, as there are some materials to process.

This post will be very heavy on InnoDB configuration, so let’s start with the basic configuration for MySQL, but before that some initial environment.

I use MySQL version 8.0.21 on the hardware as described here

As for the storage, I am not using some “old dusty SSD”, but production available Enterprise-Grade Intel SATA SSD …

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