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Displaying posts with tag: Benchmarks (reset)
How Binary Logs Affect MySQL 8.0 Performance

As part of my benchmarks of binary logs, I’ve decided to check how the recently released MySQL 8.0 performance is affected in similar scenarios, especially as binary logs are enabled by default. It is also interesting to check how MySQL 8.0 performs against the claimed performance improvements in redo logs subsystem.

I will use a similar setup as in my last blog with MySQL 8.0, using the utf8mb4 charset.

I have a few words about MySQL 8.0 tuning. Dimitri’s recommends in his blog posts using innodb_undo_log_truncate=off and …

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How Binary Logs (and Filesystems) Affect MySQL Performance

I want to take a closer look at MySQL performance with binary logs enabled on different filesystems, especially as MySQL 8.0 comes with binary logs enabled by default.

As part of my benchmarks of the MyRocks storage engine, I’ve noticed an unusual variance in throughput for the InnoDB storage engine, even though we spent a lot of time making it as stable as possible in Percona Server for MySQL. In the end, the culprit was enabled binary logs. There is also always the question, “If there is a problem with EXT4, does XFS perform differently?” To answer that, I will repeat the same benchmark on the EXT4 and XFS filesystems.

You can find our previous experiments with binary logs here: …

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A Look at MyRocks Performance

In this blog post, I’ll look at MyRocks performance through some benchmark testing.

As the MyRocks storage engine (based on the RocksDB key-value store http://rocksdb.org ) is now available as part of Percona Server for MySQL 5.7, I wanted to take a look at how it performs on a relatively high-end server and SSD storage. I wanted to check how it performs for different amounts of available memory for the given database size. This is similar to the benchmark I published a while ago for InnoDB (https://www.percona.com/blog/2010/04/08/fast-ssd-or-more-memory/).

In this case, I plan to use a sysbench-tpcc benchmark ( …

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Percona Live 2018 Keynotes, Day One

Welcome to Percona Live 2018 keynotes, day one!

Percona Live 2018 is up and running! We call this day one, but in reality, yesterday was filled with tutorials that provided excellent and practical information on how to get your MySQL, MongoDB, MariaDB and PostgreSQL environments up, running and optimized.

Today we started with keynote presentations from Percona, a technology panel, Oracle and Netflix. You can view the recording of today’s keynotes here.

Percona Welcome

Laurie Coffin (Percona)

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Sneak Peek at Proxytop Utility

In this blog post, I’ll be looking at a new tool Proxytop for managing MySQL topologies using ProxySQL. Proxytop is a self-contained, real-time monitoring tool for ProxySQL. As some of you already know ProxySQL is a popular open source, high performance and protocol-aware proxy server for MySQL and its forks (Percona and MariaDB).

My lab uses MySQL and ProxySQL on Docker containers provided by Nick Vyzas. This lab also uses Alexey Kopytov’s Sysbench utility to perform benchmarking against ProxySQL.

Pre-requisites:

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TPCC-Like Workload for Sysbench 1.0

In this post I’ll look at some of our recent work for benchmark enthusiasts: a TPCC-like workload for Sysbench (version 1.0 or later).

Despite being 25 years old, the TPC-C benchmark can still provide an interesting intensive workload for a database in my opinion. It runs multi-statement transactions and is write-heavy. We also decided to use Sysbench 1.0, which allows much more flexible LUA scripting that allows us to implement TPCC-like workload.

For a long time, we used the tpcc-mysql (https://github.com/Percona-Lab/tpcc-mysql) tool for performance evaluations of MySQL and Percona Server for MySQL, but we recognize that the tool is far from being intuitive and simple to use. So we hope the adaptation for Sysbench will …

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MyISAM and KPTI – Performance Implications From The Meltdown Fix

Recently we had a report from a user who had seen a stunning 90% performance regression after upgrading his server to a Linux kernel with KPTI (kernel page-table isolation – a remedy for the Meltdown vulnerability). A big deal of those 90% was caused by running in an old version of VMware which doesn’t pass […]

The post MyISAM and KPTI – Performance Implications From The Meltdown Fix appeared first on MariaDB.org.

Percona Database Performance Blog Year in Review: Top Blog Posts

Let’s look at some of the most popular Percona Database Performance Blog posts in 2017.

The closing of a year lends itself to looking back. And making lists. With the Percona Database Performance Blog, Percona staff and leadership work hard to provide the open source community with insights, technical support, predictions and metrics around multiple open source database software technologies. We’ve had over three and a half million visits to the blog in 2017: thank you! We look forward to providing you with even better articles, news and information in 2018.

As 2017 moves into 2018, let’s take a quick look back at some of the most popular posts on the blog this year.

Top 10 Most Read

These posts had the most number of views (working down from the highest):

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Best Practices for Percona XtraDB Cluster on AWS

In this blog post I’ll look at the performance of Percona XtraDB Cluster on AWS using different service instances, and recommend some best practices for maximizing performance.

You can use Percona XtraDB Cluster in AWS environments. We often get questions about how best to deploy it, and how to optimize both performance and spend when doing so. I decided to look into it with some benchmark testing.

For these benchmark tests, I used the following configuration:

  • Region:
    • Availability zones: US East – 1, zones: b, c, d
    • Sysbench 1.0.8
    • ProxySQL 1.4.3
    • 10 tables, 40mln records – ~95GB dataset
    • Percona XtraDB Cluster 5.7.18
    • Amazon Linux AMI

We …

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One Million Tables in MySQL 8.0

In my previous blog post, I talked about new general tablespaces in MySQL 8.0. Recently MySQL 8.0.3-rc was released, which includes a new data dictionary. My goal is to create one million tables in MySQL and test the performance.

Background questions

Q: Why million tables in MySQL? Is it even realistic? How does this happen?

Usually, millions of tables in MySQL is a result of “a schema per customer” Software as a Service (SaaS) approach. For the purposes of customer data isolation (security) and logical data partitioning (performance), each “customer” has a dedicated schema. You can think of a WordPress hosting service (or any CMS based hosting) where each …

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