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Displaying posts with tag: Benchmarks (reset)
MySQL group replication: installation with Docker

Overview

MySQL Group Replication was released as GA with MySQL 5.7.17. It is essentially a plugin that, when enabled, allows users to set replication with this new way.

There has been some confusion about the stability and usability of this release. Until recently, MySQL Group Replication (MGR) was only available in the Labs, which traditionally denotes a preview or an use-at-your-own-risk feature. Several months ago we saw the release of Group Replication as a Docker image, which allowed users to deploy a peer-to-peer cluster (every node is a master.) However, about one month after such release, word came from Oracle discouraging this setup, and inviting users to use Group Replicator in …

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The Impact of Swapping on MySQL Performance

In this blog, I’ll look at the impact of swapping on MySQL performance. 

It’s common sense that when you’re running MySQL (or really any other DBMS) you don’t want to see any I/O in your swap space. Scaling the cache size (using

innodb_buffer_pool_size

 in MySQL’s case) is standard practice to make sure there is enough free memory so swapping isn’t needed.   

But what if you make some mistake or miscalculation, and swapping happens? How much does it really impact performance? This is exactly what I set out to investigate.

My test system has the following:

  • 32GB of physical memory
  • OS (and swap space) on a (pretty old) Intel 520 SSD device
  • Database stored on Intel 750 NVMe storage

To simulate a worst case scenario, I’m using Uniform Sysbench Workload:

sysbench …
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Millions of Queries per Second: PostgreSQL and MySQL’s Peaceful Battle at Today’s Demanding Workloads

This blog compares how PostgreSQL and MySQL handle millions of queries per second.

Anastasia: Can open source databases cope with millions of queries per second? Many open source advocates would answer “yes.” However, assertions aren’t enough for well-grounded proof. That’s why in this blog post, we share the benchmark testing results from Alexander Korotkov (CEO of Development, Postgres Professional) and Sveta Smirnova (Principal Technical Services Engineer, Percona). The comparative research of PostgreSQL 9.6 and MySQL 5.7 performance will be especially valuable for environments with multiple databases.

The idea behind this research is to provide an honest comparison for the two popular RDBMSs. Sveta and Alexander wanted to test the most recent versions of both MySQL and PostgreSQL with the same tool, under the same challenging …

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Make MySQL 8.0 Better Through Better Benchmarking

This blog post discusses how better MySQL 8.0 benchmarks can improve MySQL in general.

Like many in MySQL community, I’m very excited about what MySQL 8.0 offers. There are a lot of great features and architecture improvements. Also like many in the MySQL community, I would like to see MySQL 8.0 perform better. Better performance is what we always want (and expect) from new database software releases.

Rarely do performance improvements happen by accident – they require running benchmarks, finding bottlenecks and eliminating them. This is the area where I think things could use improvement.

If you come to the MySQL Keynote at Oracle OpenWorld, or if you go to MySQL …

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Query rewrite plugin: scalability fix in MySQL 5.7.14

In this post, we’ll look at a scalability fix for issues the query rewrite plugin had on performance.

Several months ago, Vadim blogged about the impact of a query rewrite plugin on performance. We decided to re-evaluate the latest release of 5.7(5.7.14), which includes fixes for this issue.

I reran tests for MySQL 5.7.13 and 5.7.14 using the same setup and the same test: sysbench OLTP_RO without and with the query rewrite plugin enabled.

MySQL 5.7.14 performs much better, with almost no overhead. Let’s check PMP for these runs:

MySQL 5.7.13

206 …
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Small innodb_page_size as a performance boost for SSD

In this blog post, we’ll discuss how a small innodb_page_size can create a performance boost for SSD.

In my previous post Testing Samsung storage in tpcc-mysql benchmark of Percona Server I compared different Samsung devices. Most solid state drives (SSDs) use 4KiB as an internal page size, and the InnoDB default page size is 16KiB. I wondered how using a different innodb_page_size might affect the overall performance.

Fortunately, MySQL 5.7 comes with the option innodb_page_size, so you can set different InnoDB page sizes than the standard 16KiB. This option is still quite inconvenient to use, however. You can’t change innodb_page_size for the existing database. Instead, you need to create a brand new database with a …

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tpcc-mysql benchmark tool: less random with multi-schema support

In this blog post, I’ll discuss changes I’ve made to the

tpcc-mysql

 benchmark tool. These changes make it less random and support multi-schema.

This post might only be interesting to performance researchers. The

tpcc-mysql

 benchmark to is what I use to test different hardware (as an example, see my previous post: https://www.percona.com/blog/2016/07/26/testing-samsung-storage-in-tpcc-mysql-benchmark-percona-server/).

The first change is support for multiple schemas, rather than just one schema. Supporting only one schema creates too much internal locking in MySQL on the same rows or the same index. Locking is …

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Testing Samsung storage in tpcc-mysql benchmark of Percona Server

This blog post will detail the results of Samsung storage in

tpcc-mysql

 benchmark using Percona Server.

I had an opportunity to test different Samsung storage devices under tpcc-mysql benchmark powered by Percona Server 5.7. You can find a summary with details here https://github.com/Percona-Lab-results/201607-tpcc-samsung-storage/blob/master/summary-tpcc-samsung.md

I have in my possession:

  • Samsung 850 Pro, 2TB: This is a SATA device and is positioned as consumer-oriented, something that you would use in a high-end user desktop. As of this post, I estimate the price of this device as around $430/TB.
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Evaluating Database Compression Methods: Update

This blog post is an update to our last post discussing database compression methods, and how they stack up against each other. 

When Vadim and I wrote about Evaluating Database Compression Methods last month, we claimed that evaluating database compression algorithms was easy these days because there are ready-to-use benchmark suites such as lzbench.

As easy as it was to do an evaluation with this tool, it turned out it was also easy to make a mistake. Due to a bug in the benchmark we got incorrect results for the LZ4 …

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Percona Server 5.7 performance improvements

In this blog post, we’ll be discussing Percona Server 5.7 performance improvements.

Starting from the Percona Server 5.6 release, we’ve introduced several significant changes that help address performance problems for highly-concurrent I/O-bound workloads. Some of our research and improvements were re-implemented for MySQL 5.7 – one of the best MySQL releases. But even though MySQL 5.7 showed progress in various aspects of scalability and performance, we’ve found that it’s possible to push I/O bound workload limits even further.

Percona Server 5.7.11 currently has two major performance features in this area:

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