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Problems with Oracle's Way of MySQL Bugs Database Maintenance

In one of my previous posts I stated that Oracle does not care enough to maintain public MySQL bugs database properly. I think it's time to explain this statement in details.

The fact that https://bugs.mysql.com/ still exists and community bug reports there are still processed on a regular basis by my former colleagues, Miguel Solorzano, Sinisa Milivojevic, Umesh Shastry, Bogdan Kecman and others, is awesome. Some probably had not expected this to still be the case for 8+ years since Oracle took over the software and procedures around it. My former bugs verification team still seems to exist and even get some new members. Moreover, today we have less …

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Auditing MariaDB for Secured Database Infrastructure Operations

When you are building Database Infrastructure for an data sensitive business (like financial services, digital commerce, advertising media solutions, healthcare etc. ) governed by compliance and policies, You are expected to maintain the audit log of the transactions to investigate, if you ever suspect something unacceptable (i.e., user updating / deleting data) happening to your database . MariaDB provides Audit Plugin (MariaDB started including by default the Audit Plugin from versions 10.0.10 and 5.5.37, and it can be installed in any version from MariaDB 5.5.20.) to log the server activity, Although the MariaDB Audit Plugin has some unique features available only for MariaDB, it can be used also with MySQL. MariaDB Audit Plugin log the details like who connected to server (i.e., username and host), what queries were executed, the tables accessed and server variables changed. This information is retained in a rotating log file or sent to …

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MySQL Router HA with Keepalived

After having explained how to achieve HA for MySQL Router for people who doesn’t want to install the MySQL Router on the application servers and after having illustrated how to use Pacemaker, this article explains how to setup HA for MySQL Router using keepalived.

Keepalived is very popular, maybe because it’s also very easy to use. We can of course use 2 or more servers. The principle is the same as on the previous articles, if the router dies, the virtual IP used by the application server(s) to connect to MySQL is sent to another machine where mysqlrouter is still running.

Let’s have a look at the configuration, in this case we use 2 machines, mysql1 and …

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MySQL Router HA with Pacemaker

This article will explain how to setup HA for MySQL Router as described in a previous article about where should the router stand.

For this setup, I will use Pacemaker (part of RedHat High Availability Add-on and available on RHEL, CentOS, Oracle Linux, …).

Of course we need a MySQL InnoDB Cluster but we won’t really use it for the HA setup of the MySQL Router.

Installing Pacemaker

The first step is to install pacemaker on all the machines we will use for our “MySQL Router Cluster”:

# yum install pacemaker pcs resource-agents

Now we need to start the pcsd service and enable it at boot (on all machines):

# systemctl start pcsd.service 
# systemctl enable pcsd.service

It’s time now to setup authentication, this operation is again …

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MySQL InnoDB Cluster: is the router a single point of failure ?

As you know, MySQL InnoDB Cluster is composed of 3 elements:

  • a group replication cluster of at least 3 servers
  • the MySQL Shell used to manage the cluster
  • the MySQL Router that send the traffic from the application server(s) to the cluster

When presenting the solution in conferences, one the main question is Where should I put the router ? and the answer is always the same: the best place to install the router is the application server !

The router is a very lightweight process that gets its configuration from the cluster’s metadata and doesn’t require a lot of resources or maintenance.

So the ideal setup is the following:

However for many (obscure?) reasons, sometimes people doesn’t want to have the MySQL …

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Hackathon process per week Sprints Idea

I like hackathons. Hackathons provide the freedom to build outside the process. The forced speed to deliver something to demo and the fun self-deprecation of "ooh this is really ugly/bad TODO don't do this." in the source/commit logs which tells a great story. Also, a great side effect; people are really interested in refactoring and fixing the code especially if the demo went well.

So, I started thinking what if we can take this naturally formed fun process and define a weekly sprint, with a daily standup reporting on the process to achieve the product goal, using a hackathon method.

Day 1 and 2"How much can you get done in two days for the demo"

  • This portion is no more than an hour planing. You talk to your team and divide up tasks for the hack you want to demo-in two days. For instance, "Johnny says I'll write the service" and "Amanda says I'll provide the data-it will be in …
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De-Normalization of Your Database with JSON

One of the humbling things about working at Oracle with the various MySQL personnel is that you are often blown away by something one of them says or does.  And that is on a regular basis.  In this case it is Dr. Charles Bell who gave a great series of presentations last June at the Southeast Linuxfest.
In particular he presented in a full formed state some ideas that had been rattling around in my  skull (but no way near as coherent) on how to take advantage of the MySQL JSON data type.  Below are his points from his slide deck.  I was reviewing my notes from his presentation when I realized that this information really needs to be more widely disseminated.   And I would like your feedback on these ideas?
1.. We can use a JSON field to eliminate one of the issues of traditional database solutions: many-to-many-joins

  • This allows more freedom to store unstructured data (data with pieces …
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MariaDB Connector/Node.js First Alpha Now Available

MariaDB Connector/Node.js First Alpha Now Available diego Dupin Fri, 07/20/2018 - 09:33

MariaDB is pleased to announce the immediate availability of MariaDB Connector/Node.js alpha version 0.7.0. This is a non-blocking MariaDB client for Node.js, 100 percent JavaScript, compatible with Node.js 6+.

Why a new client? While there are existing clients that work with MariaDB, (such as the mysql and mysql2 clients), the MariaDB Node.js Connector offers new functionality, like insert Streaming and Pipelining while making no compromises on performance.

Insert Streaming

Using a Readable stream in your application, you can …

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InnoDB Cluster in a Nutshell Part 3: MySQL Shell

Welcome to the third part of this series. I’m glad you’re still reading, as hopefully this means you find this subject interesting at least. Previously we presented the first two components of MySQL InnoDB Cluster: Group Replication and MySQL Router and now we will discuss the last component, MySQL Shell.

MySQL Shell

This is the last component in the cluster and I love it. Oracle have created this tool to centralize cluster management, providing a friendly, command-line based user interface.

The tool can be defined as an advanced MySQL shell, which is much more powerful than the well known MySQL client. With the capacity to work …

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Mastering Continuent Clustering Series: Experience the Power of the Tungsten Connector, an Intelligent MySQL Proxy

In this blog post, we talk about the basic function and features of the Tungsten Connector.

The Tungsten Connector is an intelligent MySQL proxy that provides key high-availability and read-scaling features. This includes the ability to route MySQL queries by inspecting them in-flight.

The most important function of the Connector is failover handling. When the cluster detects a failed master because the MySQL server port is no longer reachable, the Connectors are signaled and traffic is re-routed to the newly-elected Master node.

Next is the ability to route MySQL queries based on various factors. In the default Bridge mode, traffic is routed at the TCP layer, and read-only queries must be directed to a different port (normally 3306 for writes and 3307 for reads).

There are additional modes, Proxy/Direct and …

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