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Webinar Tues 6/26: MariaDB Server 10.3

Please join Percona’s Chief Evangelist, Colin Charles on Tuesday, June 26th, 2018, as he presents MariaDB Server 10.3 at 7:00 AM PDT (UTC-7) / 10:00 AM EDT (UTC-4).

Register Now

 

MariaDB Server 10.3 is out. It has some interesting features around system versioned tables, Oracle compatibility, column compression, an integrated SPIDER engine, as well as MyRocks. Learn about what’s new, how you can use it, and how it is different from MySQL.

Register Now

Colin Charles Chief Evangelist

Colin Charles is the Chief Evangelist at Percona. He was previously on the founding team of MariaDB Server in 2009, and had …

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Percona XtraBackup 2.4.12 Is Now Available

Percona announces the GA release of Percona XtraBackup 2.4.12 on June 22, 2018. You can download it from our download site and apt and yum repositories.

Percona XtraBackup enables MySQL backups without blocking user queries, making it ideal for companies with large data sets and mission-critical applications that …

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UNDERSTANDING MySQL CLIENT / SERVER PROTOCOL USING PYTHON AND WIRESHARK – PART 1

MySQL Client / Server protocol is used in many areas. For example:

  • MySQL Connectors like ConnectorC, ConnectorJ and etc.
  • MySQL proxy
  • Between master and slave

What is MySQL Client / Server protocol?

MySQL Client / Server protocol is accepted conventions (rules). Through these rules client and server “talks” and understand each other. Client connects to server through TCP connection with special socket, sends to server special packets and accepts them from server. There are two phases of this connection:

  • Connection phase
  • Command phase

Next illustration describes phases:

STRUCTURE OF PACKETS

Each packet consists of valuable data types. Maximum length of each packet can be 16MB. If the length of packet is more than 16MB, then it is separated into several chunks (16MB). First of all let’s see the protocol data types. …

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On InnoDB Data Compression in MySQL

Another story that I've prepared back in April for my meeting with one of customers in London was a "compression story". We spent a lot of time on it in several support issues in the past, with only limited success.

In case of InnoDB tables, there are actually two ways to compress data (besides relying on filesystem compression or compressing individual columns at server or application side). Historically the first one was introduced by the Barracuda InnoDB file format and ROW_FORMAT=COMPRESSED it supported. Notable number of related bugs were reported with time, and it may be not that easy to identify them all (you can find current list of bugs tagged with "compression" …

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MySQL 8.0 InnoDB Cluster – the quick hands-on manual

I’m just back from a trip in Barcelona where I presented MySQL 8.0 InnoDB Cluster (at dataops and Barcelona MySQL Meetup) and the majority of feedback was great, but I also had some comments on the demos I showed. The first one was:

This is a joke of course (maybe it’s true for some), people found it very easy and they liked it.

But then, the second one was that all I showed wasn’t easy to find, some people who already played with the solution didn’t succeeded in creating a cluster so easily… not because they had errors or encountered bugs, but more because they just didn’t know how to do it.

The goal of this …

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On Partitioning in MySQL

Back in April I was preparing for vacations that my wife and I planned to spend in UK. Among other things planned I wanted to visit a customer's office in London and discuss few MySQL and MariaDB related topics, let's call them "stories". I tried to prepare myself for the discussion and collected a list of known active bugs (what else could I do as MySQL entomologist) for each of them. Surely live discussion was not suitable to share lists of bugs (and for some "stories" they were long), so I promised to share them later, in my blog. Time to do what I promised had finally come!

One of the stories we briefly discussed was "partitioning story". Right now I can immediately identify at least 47 active MySQL bugs in the related …

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Not a Fan of Redhat RPMs Today or Why No Follow Up for RH/Centos/Fedora from Last Blog


I received a lot of good feedback Building the PHP MySQL XDevAPI PECL Extension on MySQL 8.0.11 and PHP 7.2 for the MySQL Document Store including a few folks asking if I could document that it takes to get the MySQL X DevAPI working with an RPM based Linux distro.

Well I'd really like to.  But I can't.

Redhat Linux 4 I still remember getting my copy of Redhat Linux 4.0 (not RHEL -- no enterprise thoughts in those days)  It was January 1997 and I installed it the week before Rehaht 4.1 came out.  I thought that RPMs were much better than the old 'unzip the tar file;./configure; make install' circus. I thought Redhat was pretty cool. Heck I even became a RHCE.  
Then I found the Debian variants easier to work with and more up to date.  My not so …

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Getting started with Orchestrator

Orchestrator is a MySQL high availability and replication management tool. In this blog post, we will cover the first steps for getting started with it on an existing topology.

The code examples assume you are running Centos 7, but the general steps should be similar if you are running other operating system versions/flavors.

Prep work

1. Create a MySQL user on each of your database servers.
Orchestrator will connect with this user to discover the topology and to perform any changes you tell it to make.

CREATE USER 'orchestrator'@'%' IDENTIFIED BY '****';
GRANT SUPER, PROCESS, REPLICATION SLAVE, RELOAD ON *.* TO 'orchestrator'@'%';
GRANT SELECT ON mysql.slave_master_info TO 'orchestrator'@'%';
GRANT SELECT ON meta.* TO 'orchestrator'@'%';

Note: Orchestrator reads replication credentials stored in mysql.slave_master_info table, which implies you need to set up your servers with master_info_repository = …

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Back to basics: Isolation Levels In MySQL

In this blog, we will see the very basic thing “I” of “ACID” and an important property of Transaction ie., “ISOLATION”

The isolation defines the way in which the MySQL server (InnoDB) separates each transaction from other concurrent running transaction in the server and also ensures that the transactions are processed in a reliable way. If transactions are not isolated then one transaction could modify the data that another transaction is reading hence creating data inconsistency. Isolation levels determine how isolated the transactions are from each other.

MySQL supports all four the isolation levels that SQL-Standard defines.The four isolation levels are

  • READ UNCOMMITTED
  • READ COMMITTED
  • REPEATABLE READ
  • SERIALIZABLE

The Isolation level’s can be set globally or session based on our requirements.

 

 

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How to Install Pimcore CMS on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS

Pimcore is a free and open-source enterprise content management system written in PHP language and uses MySQL/MariaDB for databases. It is fast, flexible, and designer and developer-friendly that allow us to manage and share all of our digital assets across any channel.

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