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Who are you? The history of MySQL and MariaDB authentication protocols from 1997 to 2017

MySQL 3.20 to 4.0 In the good old days, when 32MB of RAM justified the name my-huge.cnf, when nobody knew Google and Facebook didn’t even exist, security was… how do I put it… kind of cute. Computer viruses didn’t steal millions and didn’t disrupt elections — they played Yankee Doodle or told you not to […]

The post Who are you? The history of MySQL and MariaDB authentication protocols from 1997 to 2017 appeared first on MariaDB.org.

How to Secure MySQL/MariaDB Servers

After attacks on MongoDB databases, we have recently also seen that MySQL servers are being targeted by ransomware. This should not come as a surprise, given the increasing adoption of public and private clouds. Running a poorly configured database in the cloud can become a major liability.

In this blog post, we’ll share with you a number of tips on how to protect and secure your MySQL or MariaDB servers.

Understanding the Attack Vector

Quoting SCMagazine:
The attack starts with brute-forcing the root password for the MySQL database. Once logged in, the MySQL databases and …

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Network attacks on MySQL, Part 3: What do you trust?

In my previous blogs I told you to enable SSL/TLS and force the connection to be secured. So I followed my advice and did forced SSL. Great!

So now everything is 100% secure isn't it?

No it isn't and I would never claim anything to be 100% secure.

There are important differences in the SSL/TLS implementations of browers and the implementation in MySQL. One of these differences is that your browser has a trust store with a large set of trusted certificate authorities. If the website you visit has SSL enabled then your browser will check if the certificate it presents is signed by a trusted CA. MySQL doesn't use a list of trusted CA's, and this makes sense for many setups.

The key difference is that a website has clients (browsers) which are not managed by the same organization. And for MySQL connections the set of clients is often much smaller are more or less managed by one organization. Adding a CA for a set of …

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Dropping Foreign Key constraint using pt-online-schema-change

Before we proceed, here is useful blog post  written by Peter on Hijacking Innodb Foreign Keys.

However, if you are trying to get rid of an unused Foreign Key (FK) constraint and related columns from versions older than mysql 5.6 or tables which cannot be executed with

ALTER TABLE ... ALGORITHM=INPLACE

  because of limitations mentioned here (specifically tables with 5.5 TIMESTAMP formats), you can use pt-online-schema-change  to drop such foreign keys.

For DROP FOREIGN KEY

constraint_name

  with  PT-OSC requires specifying

_constraint_name

  rather than the real

constraint_name …
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MySQL InnoDB Cluster – Real-World Cluster Tutorial for OEL, Fedora, RHEL and CentOS

In this tutorial, we are going to guide you through the process of preparing and configuring RPM based distributions, such as OEL, Fedora or CentOS, for InnoDB cluster usage. We will address the steps from the initial configurations, to the cluster creation, and finally the MySQL Router configuration to map the data traffic.…

MySQL InnoDB Cluster – Real-World Cluster Tutorial for Ubuntu and Debian

In this tutorial, we are going to guide you through the whole process of configuring Debian based distributions for InnoDB cluster usage; the most popular being Ubuntu. We will address the steps from the initial configurations, to the cluster creation, and finally the MySQL Router configuration to map the data traffic.…

MySQL InnoDB Cluster – Preparing a Linux VM for a Real-World Cluster

In this tutorial, we are going to guide you through the process of preparing and configuring an Ubuntu mini host for InnoDB cluster usage.

To create a cluster with tolerance to one failure, we need three instances. So we’re going to create and configure a Virtual Machine and clone it two times.…

MySQL InnoDB Cluster – Setting up a Real-World Cluster

Nowadays, it’s very important to have a high availability solution that gives you serenity and security for your data. The task of ensuring your data will always be available is a challenging one, that not everyone wants to do because it demands a lot of knowledge about tools, configuration, and technologies.…

MySQL InnoDB Cluster – What’s New in the Release Candidate

We carefully listened to the feedback we got from the last preview release and incorporated many of the suggested changes. On top of that, we have fixed several bugs and extended existing functionalities.

Here are the highlights of this release!

MySQL Shell / X AdminAPI

We keep aiming at the goal of hiding the complexity associated with configuring and managing H/A setups, but on top of that, we see usability as a great priority.…

MySQL InnoDB Cluster – Release Candidate Discussion

You might already have seen the announcement of the MySQL InnoDB Cluster Release Candidate (RC), available for download from our MySQL APT (Ubuntu, Debian) and YUM (Redhat, OEL, Fedora) repositories and from dev.mysql.com. As usual, this releases contains the following three components.…

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