Showing entries 1 to 10 of 1088
10 Older Entries »
Displaying posts with tag: Replication (reset)
Understanding Cross-Site Replication in a Tungsten Composite Multi-Master MySQL/MariaDB Cluster

Overview The Skinny

In this blog post we will discuss how the managed cross-site replication streams work in a Composite Multi-Master Tungsten MySQL/MariaDB Cluster.

Agenda What’s Here?

  • Briefly explore how managed cross-site replication works in a Tungsten Composite Multi-Master MySQL/MariaDB Cluster
  • Describe the reasons why the default design was chosen
  • Explain the pros and cons of changing the configuration
  • Examine how to change the configuration of the managed cross-site replicators

Cross-Site Replication A Very Brief Summary

In a standard Composite Multi-Master (CMM) deployment, the managed cross-site replicators pull Transaction History Logs (THL) from every remote cluster’s current master node.

[Read more]
Flashback Recovery in MariaDB/MySQL Servers

In this blog, we will see how to do a flashback recovery or rolling back the data in MariaDB, MySQL and Percona.

As we know the saying  “All humans make mistakes”, following that in Database environment the data modified accidentally can bring havoc to any organisations.

Recover the lost data

  • The data can be recovered from the latest full backup or incremental backup when data size is huge it could take hours to restore it.
  • From backup of Binlogs.
  • Data can also be recovered from delayed slaves, this case would be helpful when the mistake is found immediately, within the period of delay.

We can use anyone of the above ways or other that can help to recover the lost data, but what really matters is, What is the …

[Read more]
MySQL Support Engineer's Chronicles, Issue #9

My previous post from this series was published more than 1.5 years ago. I had never planned to stop writing about my everyday work on a regular basis, but sometimes it's not easy to pick up something really interesting for wider MySQL audience and when in doubts I always prefer to write about MySQL bugs...

In any case, any long way starts from the first step, so I decided to write one post in this series per week and try to summarize in it whatever findings, questions, discussions, bugs and links I've collected over the week. My work experience differs week after week, so some of these posts may be boring or less useful, but I still want to try to create them on a regular basis.

I was working on (upcoming) blog post (inspired by one customer issue) on …

[Read more]
the MySQL Team in Austin, TX

At the end of the month, some engineers of the MySQL Team will be present in Austin, TX !

We will attend the first edition of Percona Live USA in Texas.

During that show, you will have the chance to meet key engineers, product managers, as well as Dave and myself.

Let me present you the Team that will be present during the conference:

The week will start with the MySQL InnoDB Cluster full day tutorial by Kenny and myself. This tutorial is a full hands-on tutorial where we will start by migrating a classical asynchronous master-replicas topology to a new MySQL InnoDB Cluster. We will then experience …

[Read more]
Troubleshooting Data Differences in a MySQL Database Cluster

Overview The Skinny

From time to time we are asked how to check whether or not there are data discrepancies between Master/Slave nodes within a MySQL (or MariaDB) cluster that’s managed with Tungsten Clustering. This is always a challenging task, not least because we hope and believe that our replication mechanism would avoid such occurrences, that said there can be factors outside of our control that can appear to “corrupt” data – such as inadvertent execution of DML against a slave using a root level user account.

Tungsten Replicator, the core replication component in our Tungsten Clustering solution for MySQL (& MariaDB), is just that, a replicator – it takes transactions from the binary logs and replicates them around. The replicator isn’t a data synchronisation tool in that respect, the …

[Read more]
Fun with Bugs #85 - On MySQL Bug Reports I am Subscribed to, Part XX

We have a public holiday here today and it's raining outside for a third day in a row already, so I hardly have anything better to do than writing yet another review of public MySQL bug reports that I've subscribed to recently.

Not sure if these reviews are really considered useful by anyone but few of my readers, but I am still going to try in a hope to end up with some useful conclusions. Last time I've stopped on Bug #94903, so let me continue with the next bug in my list:

[Read more]
MySQL 8.0.16 Replication Enhancements

MySQL 8.0.16 has been released last Thursday. In it, you can find some new replication features. Here is a quick summary. Follow-up blog posts will provide details about these features.

  • Large Messages Fragmentation Layer for Group Replication. Tiago Vale’s work, introduces message fragmentation to the Group Communication Framework.

Fun with Bugs #84 - On Some Public Bugs Fixed in MySQL 5.7.26

Oracle released minor MySQL Server versions in all supported branches on April 25, 2019. MySQL 5.7.26 is just one of them, but recently I prefer to ignore MySQL 8 releases (after checking that I can build them from source code at least somewhere, even if it takes 18G+ of disk space and that they work in basic tests), as there are more chances for MySQL 5.7 bug fixes to affect me (and customers I care about) directly.

So, in this yet another boring blog post (that would never be a reason for any award) I plan to concentrate …

[Read more]
Fun with Bugs #83 - On MySQL Bug Reports I am Subscribed to, Part XIX

I have not much yet to say on a popular topic of upgrading everything to MySQL 8, so let me just continue reviewing public MySQL bug reports that I've subscribed to recently. After my previous post at least one bug, Bug #94747, got enough comments and clarifications (up to specific commit that introduced this regression pointed out by Daniel Black!) to have it re-classified and verified as InnoDB code bug. So, I see good reasons to continue attracting wide public attention …

[Read more]
Fun with Bugs #82 - On MySQL Bug Reports I am Subscribed to, Part XVIII

I've got few comments to my post on references to MariaDB in MySQL bug reports (not in the blog, but via social media and in personal messages), and all but one comments from current and former colleagues whose opinion I value a lot confirmed that this really looks like a kind of attempt to advertise MariaDB. So, from now on I'll try to keep my findings on how tests shared by MySQL bug reporters work in MariaDB for myself, MariaDB JIRA and this blog (where I can and will advertise whatever makes sense to me), and avoid adding them to MySQL bug reports.

That said, I still think that it's normal to share links to MariaDB bug reports that add something useful (like patches, …

[Read more]
Showing entries 1 to 10 of 1088
10 Older Entries »