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Displaying posts with tag: Open Source (reset)
Group Replication GCS Troubleshooting

In the last post I shared the simple set of steps to configure a Group Replication setup using SQL commands, and a few in the configuration file too. Indeed, it can be simple.  But then there are times where there are more requirements and configurations need more attention. Maybe the OS environment we use for MySQL setups has never impacted us… Read More »

Asynchronous Replication from MySQL Cluster

MySQL Cluster is a highly available, distributed, shared-nothing database with very interesting performance characteristics for some workloads. Among other features, it supports automatic sharding and allows us to bypass the SQL layer if we don’t need it, via the NDB API (which in my eyes, makes it one of the few transactional nosql databases out there).

In this post, I’ll describe how we can set up replication from MySQL Cluster into a standalone MySQL server using Innodb as the storage engine.

Introduction

There are a few reasons to set up replication between MySQL Cluster and a non-NDB based MySQL server. These reasons include (but are not limited to): the need …

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Group Replication minimal SQL based configuration

So you’re interested in the “new” MySQL Group Replication feature but are concerned that configuring it is going to be difficult.  Let me soothe those concerns with this blog post.  Yes, the MySQL team has recently been discussing other methods to configure Group Replication using the RC release of MySQL Shell and how it can be used… Read More »

MySQL Ransomware: Open Source Database Security Part 3

This blog post examines the recent MySQL® ransomware attacks, and what open source database security best practices could have prevented them.

Unless you’ve been living under a rock, you know that there has been an uptick in ransomware for MongoDB and Elasticsearch deployments. Recently, we’re seeing the same for MySQL.

Let’s look and see if this is MySQL’s fault.

Other Ransomware Targets

Let’s briefly touch on how Elasticsearch and MongoDB became easy targets…

Elasticsearch

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Customizing pt-stalk to Capture the Diagnostics Data You Really Need

Valeriy Kravchuk’s great recent post on using oprofile to profile MySQL mentioned how pt-stalk, the script from Percona Toolkit to capture diagnostics data based on a detected condition, currently does not support the new operf comand, and relies instead on the deprecated and soon to be removed, opcontrol.

Fortunately, in the Open Source world, we deal with these situations by contributing, and this seemed a simple enough change that I could get a PR ready quickly and reply …

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Duplicate Indexes in MySQL

Why do we sometimes want to keep duplicate indexes?

I’ve done dutiful DBA work in the past to identify and remove what are commonly called duplicate indexes. That is, those indexes that look like (a) and (a,b). The thought is that a query will utilize an index as easily on (a) as on (a,b), and removing (a) will save storage cost and write performance. I’ve had the experience, though, of removing (a) and seeing performance tank.

(As an aside, these are really redundant indexes. A duplicate index would be (a,b) and (a,b) by two different names – this can commonly be done by object relational mapping (ORM) or other automated schema creation tools. I’ll call (a) and (a,b) redundant indexes below.)

This test is on Percona Server 5.7.14 with the sys schema installed and performance schema enabled.

Given two tables with the same number of rows and …

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MySQL on AWS: RDS vs EC2

When moving your MySQL instances to AWS, you would probably have to deal with this decision. This article will highlight some of the key factors that need to be considered in order to help you determine which is the most cost-effective solution for serving your data.

 

Introduction

RDS is based on EC2, so in this post I will focus on the benefits and disadvantages of using the former, versus migrating MySQL into user-managed EC2 instances.

The value of RDS resides in simplified provisioning and administration. Several of the most common maintenance tasks such as minor version upgrades, backups, and slave creation are automated and can be managed from the AWS console. On the other hand, RDS imposes some limitations to MySQL functionality so it could be offered “as a Service” while delivering a safe and consistent user experience. Within those limitations we can mention:

  • Storage …
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Binary Log Growth Handling in MySQL

So today we look at an aspect of capacity management or planning and how it relates to MySQL and its Logging.  For this blog I’m primarily going to look at MySQL’s binary logs. They have a tendency to grow, and will continue to if not held in check.  Happily, they tend to be easy to… Read More »

MySQL multi-instance Group Replication on systemd

In this blog post, I’d like to take a look at a few different things such as MySQL Group Replication, multi-instance MySQL setups on systemd and shell scripting the whole mess to make it easy to build, and easy to rebuild.  To be honest, it took a little help from Shinguz’s blog to get the… Read More »

Auditing MySQL Users With McAfee Plugin

It is a common auditing requirement to log user connection events, including whether or not authentication was successful.
There are a number of alternatives available for MySQL, but unfortunately there is no built-in functionality at the time of this writing. In this post we will discuss auditing MySQL users with McAfee plugin, which is available under GPL Version 2 license.

Installation instructions

These apply to debian-based hosts, but instructions for red hat are similar.

1. Download latest plugin release from github.

At the time of this post for MySQL 5.5 you can get:

wget https://bintray.com/mcafee/mysql-audit-plugin/download_file?file_path=1.0.9-release%2Faudit-plugin-mysql-5.5-1.0.9-585-linux-x86_64.zip

2. Decompress …

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