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Displaying posts with tag: Open Source (reset)
Upcoming Mydbops Database Meetup -4 (03-08-2019)

Mydbops continues with its commitment to the open source community comprising of Database Administrators. After the successful conduct of three meet-ups in the past, we are now stepping ahead on to the 4th edition of Mydbops Database meet-up.

First time, we are going to the new venue, thanks to the kind people of Zenefits Technologies India Pvt.Ltd., It is a real pleasure to be hosted by the like-minded organisation in the city of Bangalore, scheduled on Saturday, 3rd of August, 2019 at Zenefits Office.

In the past three editions, the focus was on the latest and hands-on topics by the selected speakers from the DBA World. This focus gets sharper this time as well. The topics for the 4 th Mydbops Database Meetup are:

InnoDB scalability improvements in MySQL 8.0Mr. Karthik P R, Founder / CEO of Mydbops, a MIT Masters …

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How to fix error when MySQL client fails to load SQL file with Blob data

In one of my latest database restore jobs, I was helping a MySQL client with issues related to mysqlbinlog and I wanted to share it here. In case you didn’t know, MySQL is a simple SQL shell with input line editing capabilities, while mysqlbinlog is a utility for processing binary logs a MySQL server. In this case, the server was MariaDB, but the utilities are the same. The database version was 10.1.38-MariaDB.

So, why use mysqlbinlog?

There are many reasons for using mysqlbinlog to process binary log files, but in this case, it was used for point-in-time recovery.

Let’s say you have an erroneous transaction that you run at 3:05 p.m. and your last full backup was run at 12 p.m. To be able to restore your database up to 3:05 p.m., you will need to restore the full backup that you took at 12 p.m. and then apply the events from your binary logs up to the time before you ran the erroneous transaction. This procedure is …

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Blog from the Top — The Changing Landscape of Open Source (MySQL) and Money

This is the first in a series of blog articles in which I will discuss the changing landscape of open source and money. Or, more specifically, open source databases and money. And even more specifically MySQL and its all variants (AWS Aurora, MariaDB, Percona Server, RDS/MySQL) and money. But before going too deep into what is changing, let’s review all the traditional business models in and around the MySQL marketplace.

In general, these are the following types of companies in the MySQL commercial ecosystem, sorted by total annual revenue and addressable market size:

  • Developers who do not aim to monetize the open source code, just provide value to others and hope to get development and other contributions in return. This is the purest form of open source. For example, all …
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How to Autoscale ProxySQL in the cloud

ProxySQL is a great tool. It’s one of the most recommended technologies in our Open Source Database practice.

Many of our clients are running it or are migrating towards it, but we’ve seen that it is pretty CPU-intensive. We’ve also seen strange behavior in the connection handling when reaching the CPU saturation point.

At this point, we noticed that the frontend_connections counter in the stats_mysql_users table was not decreasing even after the connections were no longer present at the network level. This counter is used to check the max_connections value in the mysql_users configuration table, causing frontend connections to receive a “Too many connections” error. So we determined that the key element here is to scale it properly. Obviously, all the major cloud providers can help us here as they all have features like auto-scaling groups.

Jervin Real of Percona has recently …

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Exposing MyRocks Internals Via System Variables: Part 7, Use Case Considerations

(In the previous post, Part 6, we covered Replication.)

In this final blog post, we conclude our series of exploring MyRocks by taking a look at use case considerations. After all, having knowledge of how an engine works is really only applicable if you feel like you’re in a good position to use it.

Advantages of MyRocks

Let’s start by talking about some of the advantages of MyRocks.

Compression

MyRocks will typically do a good job of reducing the physical footprint of your data. As I mentioned in my previous post in this series about compression, you have the ability to configure compression down to the individual compaction layers for each column family. You also get the advantage of the fact that data isn’t updated once it’s written to disk. Compaction, which was …

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Exposing MyRocks internals Via system variables: Part 6, Replication

(In the previous post, Part 5, we covered Data Reads.)

In this blog post, we continue our series of exploring MyRocks mechanics by looking at the configurable server variables and column family options. In our last post, I explained at a high level how reads occur in MyRocks, concluding the arc of covering how data moves into and out of MyRocks. In this post, we’re going to explore replication with MyRocks, more specifically read-free replication.

Some of you may already be familiar with the concepts of read-free replication as it was a key feature of the TokuDB engine, which leveraged fractal tree indexing. TokuDB was similar to MyRocks in the sense that it had a pseudo log-based storage …

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Exposing MyRocks internals via system variables: Part 5, Data Reads

(In the previous post, Part 4, we covered Compression and Bloom Filters)

In this blog post, we continue on our series of exploring MyRocks mechanics by looking at the configurable server variables and column family options. In our last post, I explained at a high level how compression and bloom filtering are applied to data files as they are initially flushed from immutable memtables and are subsequently passed through the compaction process. With that being covered, we should now have a clear understanding as to how data writing works in MyRocks and can start reviewing how data read requests are handled.

The Read Process

Let’s start off by talking about how read processes are handled at the file level. When a read request comes in, the first thing it needs to do is pull the …

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About Continuous MySQL & MariaDB Database Operations & More at Percona Live Austin This Month!

So, typically, a Percona Live (or MySQL User) Conference blog would start off with some mention of the fact that it’s great to be meeting up again in Santa Clara, California, the birthplace of the MySQL User Conference, and a continuous fixture on the yearly MySQL community agenda.

But no, not this time!

On this occasion, the Percona Live Conference blog starts off by pointing out that for the first time since its inception (as far as I can recollect), the MySQL User Conference, i.e. Percona Live Conference (in North America) doesn’t take place in Santa Clara, but rather in Austin, Texas.

Never having been to Texas before myself, I’m looking forward to that innovation, discovering the new surroundings and seeing whether that changes anything or not to the familiar “feel” of a Percona Live / MySQL User Conference.

By the way, there’s still time to …

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Pythian will be at Percona Live 2019 – Join us in Austin, Texas!

Percona Live provides the open source database community with an opportunity to discover and discuss the latest open source trends, technologies, and innovations. The conference includes the best and brightest innovators and influencers in the open source database industry.

This year, Percona Live is being held at the Hyatt Regency in Austin, Texas from May 28-30, 2019.

Pythian is proud to be a Silver Sponsor this year, with a full force of our technical experts speaking on a variety of subjects and technologies. These are sessions you won’t want to miss!

If you’re attending, make sure you swing by our booth and meet the Pythian crew. We’ll be happy to answer any questions you have about open source, cloud or anything data related. Our speakers will also be covering the event on social media and we’ll recap the event and their talks here on the Pythian …

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Exposing MyRocks Internals via system variables: Part 4, Compression and Bloom Filters

(In the previous post, Part 3, we covered Compaction.)

In this blog post, we continue on our series of exploring MyRocks mechanics by looking at the configurable server variables and column family options. In our last post, I explained at a high level how data moves from its initial disk-written files into the full data set structure of MyRocks using a process called compaction. In this post, we’re going to look a little closer at two important features that are leveraged as data cascades down through this compaction process: bloom filters and compression.

Bloom filters

Before we approach how bloom filters are used in MyRocks, we need to know what a bloom filter is. The short definition is that a bloom filter is a space-efficient data structure used to tell you if an …

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