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Displaying posts with tag: javascript (reset)
MySQL Server-side

A student question: Does JavaScript make context switching for web-based applications obsolete? Wow! I asked what that meant. He said, it means JavaScript replaces all other server-side programming languages, like PHP, C#, or Python. I asked the student why he believed that. His answer was that’s what two interviewing managers told him.

I thought it would be interesting to put the idea to a test. Below is a Node.js script that acts as a utility that queries the MySQL database with substitution variables in query. It also returns a standard out (stdout) stream of the MySQL query’s results. It also supports three flag and value pairs as arguments, and optionally writes the results of the MySQL query to a log file while still returning result as the stdout value. All errors are written to the standard error (stderr) stream.

The Node.js solution is completely portable between Windows …

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Express.js & MySQL

Sometimes, you just half to chuckle. A couple folks felt that I didn’t give enough information in my post showing how to configure a small Node.js application that could access a MySQL database. Specifically, they wanted me to explain the following:

  1. Configure your Express.js and MySQL development in a single Node.js application.
  2. How to convert the list of RowDataPacket objects as elements of data, which is really just simple JavaScript knowledge.
  3. How to bind variables into the query.

Like the other blog post, this one assumes you’ve performed a global install of Node.js on a Linux server. If you’re unfamiliar with how to perform a global Node.js installation, I cover how to do it in this …

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Node.js & MySQL

These are my notes for creating a small Node.js application that queries a MySQL database. The post will show you how to:

  1. Configure your Node.js development directory.
  2. Build a small application to test a MySQL connection.
  3. Build a small application that connects to the MySQL database and queries data.

This blog post assumes you’ve performed a global install of Node.js on a Linux server. If you’re unfamiliar with how to perform a global Node.js installation, I cover how to do it in this earlier blog post.

Before you write the Node.js applicaiton, you need to setup a db developer directory. Then, create a node_modules symbolic link to the /usr/local/lib/node_modules directory in the db directory. You can use the following command …

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Using MySQL with Deno

In the penultimate Deno article, I wrote on how to build REST APIs with Deno and Oak. In that tutorial, we used an array as a dummy storage placeholder to not overwhelm ourselves with database connection and other stuff. For this article, we are going to take that example one …

The post Using MySQL with Deno appeared first on Geeky Hacker.

MySQL Document Store – a quick-guide to storing JSON documents in MySQL using JavaScript and Python (and even SQL!)

MySQL introduced a JSON data type in version 5.7, and expanded the functionality in version 8.0.

Besides being able to store native JSON in MySQL, you can also use MySQL as a document store (doc store) to store JSON documents. And, you can use NoSQL CRUD (create, read, update and …

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Efficient Node.js Buffer usage

When building network libraries for Node.js, as we do at work, one quite quickly comes by Node's Buffer type. A Buffer gives access to a memory region in a quite raw form, allowing to handle raw data and allowing to interpret binary streams. The Buffer interface predates ES6 TypedArrays and has some optimizations.

Two optimisations are notable:

For one the slice() method does not copy data, but returns a view on the underlying data. This makes it quite efficient to work on a window of the data, but when writing one has to be careful. Simple example:

const buffer = Buffer.from("hello"); …
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SQL SELECT INTO Statement Tutorial With Example

SQL SELECT INTO Statement Tutorial With Example is today’s topic. The SQL SELECT INTO STATEMENT is used to create a table from an existing table by copying the contents of the current table to the new table. The critical point to note here is that the column and data type of column must be the same. See the following syntax.

Select column(s) 
INTO new_table 
from old_table_name where(condition).

#PARAMETERS

  1. Column(s): Name of the columns which we want to copy.
  2. INTO: This is a keyword which is used to perform the copy operation.
  3. New_table: Name of the new table which will be created.
  4. Old_table_name: Name of the old table from where we are copying.
  5. Where(condition): This is used for imposing conditions into the select statement.

#SQL SELECT INTO Statement

The SELECT INTO statement copies the data from …

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Jquery Duplicate Fields Form Submit with PHP

This tutorial explains How to submit jquery duplicate/clone field values to form with PHP.  In this example we are going to provide very simple example and using existing jquery plugin, so here we are using relCopy.js jquery plugin to duplicating the existing field.


                                             Download                    …

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Your SQL IS NOT JavaScript (neither PHP)

IS NULL, IS NOT NULL, truthiness among other assertions on MySQL and PostgreSQL

People like to complain about JavaScript, how can one thing be equal to the other, i.e. null == undefined evaluates to true unless you use the triple equals ===. Other dynamic typed languages have its peculiarities, such as Ruby where 0 == true evaluates to true, the reason for Ruby is that considers 0 as a value and any value evaluates to true.

How about SQL? The answer is… it depends.

Which database are you using?

Some may be more forgiving, like MySQL doing casts for you all over the place, or more strict like PostgreSQL where you can only compare the truthiness of something of the same type.

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javascript: How we wrote our own Service Worker As we continue the process of reinvigorating...

javascript:

How we wrote our own Service Worker

As we continue the process of reinvigorating Tumblr’s frontend web development, we’re always on the lookout for modern web technologies, especially ones that make our mobile site feel faster and more native. You could have guessed that we are making the mobile dashboard into a progressive app when we open-sourced our webpack plugin to make web app manifests back in August. And you would’ve been right. But to make a high quality progressive web app, you need more than just a web app manifest—you also need a …

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