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Displaying posts with tag: MySQL Developer (reset)
MySQL Query from JSON

One of my students asked how you could get JSON data out in tabular format. I said they should look at Øystein Grøvlen’s JSON_TABLE – Best of Both Worlds blog post from 2018. Unfortunately, the student wanted another example with the Video Store model that we use in class.

For clarity, all path definitions start with a $ followed by other selectors:

  • A period followed by a name, such as $.website
  • [N] where N is the position in a zero-indexed array
  • The .[*] wildcard evaluates all members of an object
  • The [*] wildcard evaluates all members of an array
  • The prefix and suffix wildcard, **, evaluates to all paths that begin with the named prefix and end with the named suffix

So, here’s a quick supplement to what’s already there. It assumes you created an …

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MySQL Backslashes

Yesterday, I wrote a blog post that showed you how to write a query returning a JSON structure for a 1:many relationship. The relationship was between the member and contact table. It returns one account_number from the member table and a list of first_name and last_name columns from the contact table in a JSON structure.

One of my students asked why I choose to strip the backslashes with Python, and my reply was the SQL was already complex for most blog readers. The student asked but how would you do it in SQL. OK, that’s a fair question for two reasons. First, you don’t need to do in your local programs because it’ll run faster on the server. Second, if you strip the backslashes you can insert it into a standard JSON column. This blog post will show you how to do both.

You would use three REGEXP_REPLACE function calls, like:

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MySQL JSON Tricks

Are they really tricks or simply basic techniques combined to create a solution. Before writing these mechanics for using native MySQL to create a compound JSON object, let me point out that the easiest way to get one is to use the MySQL Node.js library, as shown recently in my “Is SQL Programming” blog post.

Moving data from a relational model output to a JSON structure isn’t as simple as a delimited list of columns in a SQL query. Let’s look at it in stages based on the MySQL Server 12.18.2 Functions that create JSON values.

Here’s how you return single row as a JSON object, which is quite straightforward:

SELECT JSON_OBJECT('first_name',c.first_name,'last_name',c.last_name) AS json_result
FROM   contact c
WHERE …
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Is SQL Programming


Is SQL, or Structured Query Language, a programming language? That’s a great question! A question that many answer with emphasis: “No, SQL is not a programming language!” There are some who answer yes; and they usually qualify that answer with something like: “SQL is a programming language designed to communicate with relational databases.”

It strikes me that those saying “yes” are saying that SQL is only a collection of interface methods to read from and write to a database engine. Those saying SQL is not a programming language often qualify that a programming language must have conditional logic and iterative structures, which don’t exist in SQL.

There’s a third group that are fence sitters. They decline to say whether SQL is a programming language, but they also say individuals who only write SQL aren’t programmers. That’s a bit harsh from my perspective.

Before …

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Node.js MySQL Error

While I blogged about how to setup Node.js and MySQL almost two years ago, it was interesting when a student ran into a problem. The student said they’d configured the environment but were unable to use Node.js to access MySQL.

The error is caused by this import statement:

const mysql = require('mysql') 

The student got the following error, which simply says that they hadn’t installed the Node.js package for MySQL driver.

internal/modules/cjs/loader.js:638
    throw err;
    ^

Error: Cannot find module 'mysql'
    at Function.Module._resolveFilename (internal/modules/cjs/loader.js:636:15)
    at Function.Module._load (internal/modules/cjs/loader.js:562:25)
    at Module.require (internal/modules/cjs/loader.js:692:17)
    at require (internal/modules/cjs/helpers.js:25:18)
    at Object. (/home/student/Data/cit325/oracle-s/lib/Oracle12cPLSQLCode/Introduction/query.js:4:15)
    at Module._compile …
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MySQL Partitioned Tables

MySQL Partitioned Tables

Learning Outcomes

  • Learn about List Partitioning.
  • Learn about Range Partitioning.
  • Learn about Columns Partitioning.
  • Learn about Hash Partitioning.
  • Learn about Key Partitioning.
  • Learn about Subpartitioning.

Lesson Material

MySQL supports partitioning of tables. It supports range, list, hash, and key partitioning. Range partitioning lets you partition based on column values that fall within given ranges. List partitioning lets you partition based on columns matching one of a set of discrete values. Hash partitioning lets you partition based on the return value from a user-defined expression (the result from a stored SQL/PSM function). Key partitioning performs like hash partitioning, but it lets a user select one or more columns from the …

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MySQL Windows DSN

Almost a Ripley’s Believe It or Not. An prior data science student told me that his new IT department setup a Windows component that let him connect his Excel Spreadsheets to their production MySQL database without a password. Intrigued, I asked if it was a MySQL Connector/ODBC Data Source Configuration, or DSN (Data Source Name)?

He wasn’t sure, so I asked him to connect to PowerShell and run the following command:

Get-Item -Path Registry::HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\ODBC\ODBC.INI\MySQL

It returned something like this (substituting output from one of my test systems):

    Hive: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\ODBC\ODBC.INI


Name                           Property
----                           --------
MySQL                          Driver      : C:\Program Files\MySQL\Connector ODBC 8.0\myodbc8w.dll
                               DESCRIPTION : MySQL ODBC Connector
                               SERVER      : …
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MySQL CSV Output

Saturday, I posted how to use Microsoft ODBC DSN to connect to MySQL. Somebody didn’t like the fact that the PowerShell program failed to write a *.csv file to disk because the program used the Write-Host command to write to the content of the query to the console.

I thought that approach was a better as an example. However, it appears that it wasn’t because not everybody knows simple redirection. The original program can transfer the console output to a file, like:

powershell .\MySQLODBC.ps1 > output.csv

So, the first thing you need to do is add a parameter list, like:

param (
  [Parameter(Mandatory)][string]$fileName
)

Anyway, it’s trivial to demonstrate how to modify the PowerShell program to write to a disk. You should also create a virtual PowerShell drive before writing the file. That’s because you can change the physical directory anytime you want with minimal changes to rest of …

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MySQL ODBC DSN

This post explains and demonstrates how to install, configure, and use the MySQL’s ODBC libraries and a DSN (Data Source Name) to connect your Microsoft PowerShell programs to a locally or remotely installed MySQL database. After you’ve installed the MySQL ODBC library, use Windows search field to find the ODBC Data Sources dialog and run it as administrator.

There are four steps to setup, test, and save your ODBC Data Source Name (DSN) for MySQL. You can click on the images on the right to launch them in a more readable format or simply read the instructions.

MySQL ODBC Setup Steps

  1. Click the SystemDSN tab to see he view which is …
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MySQL 5-Table Procedure

A student wanted a better example of writing a MySQL Persistent Stored Module (PSM) that maintains transactional scope across a couple tables. Here’s the one I wrote about ten years ago to build the MySQL Video Store model. It looks I neglected to put it out there before, so here it is for reference.

-- Conditionally drop procedure if it exists.
DROP PROCEDURE IF EXISTS contact_insert;

-- Reset the delimiter so that a semicolon can be used as a statement and block terminator.
DELIMITER $$

SELECT 'CREATE PROCEDURE contact_insert' AS "Statement";
CREATE PROCEDURE contact_insert
( pv_member_type         CHAR(12)
, pv_account_number      CHAR(19)
, pv_credit_card_number  CHAR(19)
, pv_credit_card_type    CHAR(12)
, pv_first_name          CHAR(20)
, pv_middle_name         CHAR(20)
, pv_last_name           CHAR(20)
, pv_contact_type        CHAR(12)
, pv_address_type        CHAR(12)
, pv_city                CHAR(30)
, pv_state_province      CHAR(30)
, …
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