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Displaying posts with tag: DBA (reset)
MySQL Backup and Disaster Recovery Webinar

MySQL Backup and Disaster Recovery Webinar (Thursday, June 18, 2020 – 06:00 PM to 07:00 PM PDT)

There can be several reasons for a MySQL database outage: hardware failure, power outage, human error, natural disaster etc. We may not be able prevent all the disaster from happening but investing on a robust disaster recovery plan is very important for building fault-tolerant database infrastructure operations on MySQL.  Every MySQL DBA is accountable for developing a disaster recovery plan addressing data sensitivity, data loss tolerance and data security. Join Shiv Iyer, Founder and Principal of MinervaDB to lean about the best practices for building highly reliable MySQL DR strategy and operations on Thursday, June 18, 2020 – 06:00 PM to 07:00 PM PDT. Building DR for a high traffic MySQL database infrastructure means deep understanding of multiple backup strategies and choosing optimal ones which are best suited for performance …

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Data SRE – Building Database Systems Infrastructure for Performance and Reliability

Data SRE – Building Database Systems Infrastructure Operations for Performance and Reliability

Recently ( on Friday, 5 June 2020 – 06:00 PM PDT to 06:45 PM PDT  ) our Founder and Principal ( Shiv Iyer ) did a webinar on building Database Systems Infrastructure Operations for Performance and Reliability. In this webinar, he discussed about capacity planning / sizing, observability & resilience, performance audit / health-check / diagnostics / forensics, performance optimization & tuning and building highly available / fault-tolerant / self-healing systems architecture. You can download the PDF of the webinar here . Thanks for joining the webinar and making it a success, Looking forward to seeing you all in the next webinar.

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Java & MySQL 8.0.19

It’s the in-between term time and we’re all stuck at home. I decided to update the image for my Fedora 30 virtual machine. I had a work around to the update issue that I had encountered last October in Bug #96969 but it was not required with the current version. However, after updating from MySQL 8.0.17 to MySQL 8.0.19, I found that my Java connection example failed.

The $CLASSPATH value was correct:

/usr/share/java/mysql-connector-java.jar:.

The first error that I got was the my reference to MySQL JDBC driver was incorrect. The error message is quite clear:

Loading class `com.mysql.jdbc.Driver'. This is deprecated. The new driver class is `com.mysql.cj.jdbc.Driver'. The driver is automatically registered via the SPI and manual loading of the driver class is generally unnecessary.
Cannot connect to database server:
The server time zone …
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InnoDB Flushing in Action for Percona Server for MySQL

As the second part of the earlier post Give Love to Your SSDs – Reduce innodb_io_capacity_max! we wanted to put together some concepts on how InnoDB flushing works in recent Percona Server for MySQL versions (8.0.x prior to 8.0.19, or 5.7.x). It is important to understand this aspect of InnoDB in order to tune it correctly. This post is a bit long and complex as it goes very deep into some InnoDB internals.

InnoDB internally handles flush operations in the background to remove dirty pages from the buffer pool. A dirty page is a page that is modified in memory but not yet flushed to disk. This is done to lower the write load and the latency of the transactions. Let’s explore the various sources of flushing inside InnoDB.

Idle Flushing

We already discussed the idle flushing in the previous post …

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Setup and Deploy Vitess on Kubernetes (Minikube) for MySQL – Part III of III

In this blog post, we will continue to explore Vitess and test an example database provided in its repository. This is Part III of the previously discussed installation of Vitess on minikube environment, so please make sure to follow those steps to bring the cluster up to the following level.  

$ kubectl get pods,jobs
NAME                                                                READY     STATUS    RESTARTS   AGE
po/etcd-global-kbbcqlgvp9                                           1/1       Running   0          43m
po/etcd-zone1-lpc5zmdxxn                                            1/1       Running   0          43m
po/my-release-etcd-operator-etcd-backup-operator-6684dd6d8c-pr4n4   1/1       Running   0          1h
po/my-release-etcd-operator-etcd-operator-86d94989d6-w9lpx          1/1       Running …
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Amazon RDS MySQL Minor Upgrades: Not So Fast!

The promise of DBaaS like RDS is to reduce operational overhead (among other things) and one of the stellar cases is upgrades (major and minor). The suggested procedure involves just a couple of steps. For example, using AWS Console, you can enable “Auto minor upgrade” or modify the DB instance and schedule the upgrade to run in the next maintenance window.

But, both these options are risky because the upgrade process will start during the maintenance window but it is NOT guaranteed that the upgrade will be completed within the specified duration. 

The Problem

RDS performs a few extra steps to ensure the data consistency and rollback, making the minor version upgrade a time-consuming process:

  • It takes a backup (if automated backups are enabled) prior to starting the upgrade process.
  • Performs slow shutdown after setting …
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Give Love to Your SSDs – Reduce innodb_io_capacity_max!

The innodb_io_capacity and innodb_io_capacity_max are often misunderstood InnoDB parameters. As consultants, we see, at least every month, people setting this variable based on the top IO write specifications of their storage. Is this a correct choice? Is it an optimal value for performance? What about the SSD/Flash wear leveling?

Innodb_io_capacity 101

Let’s begin with what the manual has to say about innodb_io_capacity:

The innodb_io_capacity variable defines the number of I/O operations per second (IOPS) available to InnoDB background tasks, such as flushing pages from the buffer pool and merging data from the change buffer.

What does this mean exactly? …

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SET PERSIST in MySQL: A Small Thing for Setting System Variable Values

To set correct system variable values is the essential step to get the correct server behavior against the workload.
In MySQL, we have many System variables that can be changed at runtime, and most of them can be set at the session or global level.

To change the value of a system variable at the global level in the past, users needed to have SUPER privileges. Once the system variable value is modified as global, the server will change this behavior for the session, and obviously as global scope.

For instance, one of the most commonly adjusted variables is probably max_connections.

If you have max_connection=100 in your my.cnf or as the default value, and during the day as DBA you notice that it is not enough, it is easy just to add new connections on the fly with the command:

SET GLOBAL …
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Setting up Basic Master-Slave Replication in MySQL 8

Since April 19th, when MySQL 8.0 became Generally Available (GA), the MySQL community has been abuzz with excitement over all of the new features and improvements. Many of new features were improvements to performance or monitoring, while others were specifically related to replication. We reviewed Replication Performance Enhancements in MySQL 8 recently. Today’s blog will describe how to set up a basic master-slave configuration with MySQL, using two servers on a single machine.

Replication Defined

MySQL replication is a process in which data from one MySQL database server (the master) is copied automatically to one or more MySQL database servers (the slaves). In the case of multiple slaves, these are usually referred to as a slave cluster. Replication should not to be confused with backup operations. Whereas the aim of backups is to protect the data and/or data structure, the role of replication is typically to spread …

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Analyze MySQL & MariaDB Error Log Messages using Monyog

The MySQL error log is an essential part of database server performance monitoring. Whenever something goes wrong or performance degrades, the Error Logs are usually the first place we look to start troubleshooting.

The MySQL Error Log is one of three related log types:

  • The Error Log: It contains information about errors that occur while the server is running (as well as server start and stop events).
  • The General Query Log: This is a general record of what mysqld is doing (connect, disconnect, queries).
  • The Slow Query Log: It consists of “slow” SQL statements as defined in the long_query_time global variable.

You can enable error log monitoring to allow Monyog to keep an eye on your MySQL Error Log, and notify you when something goes awry. Moreover, Monyog combines the General Query, Slow Query and Error logs in a single view for both network and cloud servers. For example, in the …

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