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Displaying posts with tag: cloud (reset)
Q & A: MySQL In the Cloud – Migration, Best Practices, High Availability, Scaling

In this blog, we will provide answers to the Q & A for the MySQL In the Cloud: Migration, Best Practices, High Availability, Scaling webinar.

First, we want to thank everybody for attending the June 7, 2017 webinar. The recording and slides for the webinar are available here. Below is the list of your questions that we were unable to answer during the webinar:

How does Percona XtraDB cluster work with AWS for MySQL clustering?

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Percona Live 2017: Database Management Made Simple – Amazon RDS

Percona Live 2017 is done for Wednesday, but there was still time to get in one more talk before tonight’s Community Networking Reception – and the last one of the evening was about Amazon RDS.

Darin Briskman, Lead Developer Outreach & Technical Evangelist for Amazon, held two back-to-back sessions on Database management made simple – Amazon RDS. Amazon Relational Database Service (or Amazon RDS) is a distributed relational database service by Amazon Web Services (AWS).

Darin reviewed how Amazon Relational Database Service (Amazon RDS) makes it easy to set up, operate, …

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MySQL on AWS: RDS vs EC2

When moving your MySQL instances to AWS, you would probably have to deal with this decision. This article will highlight some of the key factors that need to be considered in order to help you determine which is the most cost-effective solution for serving your data.

 

Introduction

RDS is based on EC2, so in this post I will focus on the benefits and disadvantages of using the former, versus migrating MySQL into user-managed EC2 instances.

The value of RDS resides in simplified provisioning and administration. Several of the most common maintenance tasks such as minor version upgrades, backups, and slave creation are automated and can be managed from the AWS console. On the other hand, RDS imposes some limitations to MySQL functionality so it could be offered “as a Service” while delivering a safe and consistent user experience. Within those limitations we can mention:

  • Storage …
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MySQL at Oracle Open World 2016

MySQL is a growing presence at Oracle Open World. While most of the headlines belong to the main products, where Oracle services are aiming at world domination, MySQL shared the spotlight, as it was announced to be part of Oracle database cloud. It seems a logical move for Oracle: after all the effort to make MySQL 5.7 the biggest release ever, it stands to reason that it is offered as a competitive feature in its own database as a service.

With this offer, Oracle is applying enterprise pricing and methodologies to a target of emerging companies. MySQL in the Oracle cloud differs from the competition by a few key points:

  • It's only MySQL 5.7. While this is the most advanced MySQL server …
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Netflix Data Benchmark: Benchmarking Cloud Data Stores

The Netflix member experience is offered to 83+ million global members, and delivered using thousands of microservices. These services are owned by multiple teams, each having their own build and release lifecycles, generating a variety of data that is stored in different types of data store systems. The Cloud Database Engineering (CDE) team manages those data store systems, so we run benchmarks to validate updates to these systems, perform capacity planning, and test our cloud instances with multiple workloads and under different failure scenarios. We were also interested in a tool that could evaluate and compare new data store systems as they appear in the market or in the open source domain, determine their performance characteristics and limitations, and gauge whether they could be used in production for relevant use cases. For these purposes, we wrote Netflix Data Benchmark

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Google Cloud SQL Second Generation is available

Recently Google announced, that the second generation of Cloud SQL left the beta state and it is available. I decided to take a look, because last time when I checked it, it looked good, but I couldn’t take it seriously because of the nonexistent SLA. I have a few databases running on Amazon RDS, but I don’t […]

Creating An External Slave For A Live AWS Aurora Instance

Overview

When working with Amazon AWS Aurora, there are some steps to consider when trying to get data out of an active Aurora master into a slave, potentially into a EC2 instance or offsite in another data centre. Creating an external mysql to Aurora gives the option to move out of Aurora, or to have the flexibility to move data around as desired. With AWS RDS instances this task is pretty simple because you can do the following :

  1. Create a read replica
  2. Stop the slave process
  3. Capture the positioning
  4. Dump the database

With Aurora it’s a little trickier, because a read replica in Aurora has no slave process. All of the replication is handled on the back end and cannot be controlled. However, setting up an external slave can be done.

Amazon AWS Documentation

In …

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Store a tag-cloud in MySQL

There was a time when tag-clouds were the thing for website owners to fancy oneself. These clouds are mostly gone, but seen from the perspective of how to implement such a thing, one can learn quite a lot, especially with large amounts of links. Anyway, imagine you publish some articles on your website, which are stored in a table "post" and you want to to add tags to every post in order to print a tag-cloud.

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Store a tag-cloud in MySQL

There was a time when tag-clouds were the thing for website owners to fancy oneself. These clouds are mostly gone, but seen from the perspective of how to implement such a thing, one can learn quite a lot, especially with large amounts of links. Anyway, imagine you publish some articles on your website, which are stored in a table "post" and you want to to add tags to every post in order to print a tag-cloud.

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MySQL encrypted streaming backups directly into AWS S3

Overview

Cloud storage is becoming more and more popular for offsite storage and DR solutions for many businesses. This post will help with those people that want to perform this process for MySQL backups directly into Amazon S3 Storage. These steps can probably also be adapted for other processes that may not be MySQL oriented.

Steps

In order to perform this task we need to be able to stream the data, encrypt it, and then upload it to S3. There are a number of ways to do each step and I will try and dive into multiple examples so that way you can mix and match the solution to your desired results.  The AWS S3 CLI tools that I will be using to do the upload also allows encryption but to try and get these steps open for customization, I am going to do the encryption in the stream.

  1. Stream MySQL backup
  2. Encrypt the stream
  3. Upload the stream to AWS S3

Step 1 : …

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