Showing entries 1 to 10 of 427
10 Older Entries »
Displaying posts with tag: Security (reset)
Lock Down: Enforcing AppArmor with Percona XtraDB Cluster

Recently, I wrote a blog post showing how to enforce SELinux with Percona XtraDB Cluster (PXC). The Linux distributions derived from RedHat use SELinux. There is another major mandatory discretionary access control (DAC) system, AppArmor. Ubuntu, for example, installs AppArmor by default. If you are concerned by computer security and use PXC on Ubuntu, you should enforce AppArmor. This post will guide you through the steps of creating a profile for PXC and enabling it. If you don’t want to waste time, you can just grab my profile, it seems to work fine. Adapt it to your environment if …

[Read more]
Problems with Oracle's Way of MySQL Bugs Database Maintenance

In one of my previous posts I stated that Oracle does not care enough to maintain public MySQL bugs database properly. I think it's time to explain this statement in details.

The fact that https://bugs.mysql.com/ still exists and community bug reports there are still processed on a regular basis by my former colleagues, Miguel Solorzano, Sinisa Milivojevic, Umesh Shastry, Bogdan Kecman and others, is awesome. Some probably had not expected this to still be the case for 8+ years since Oracle took over the software and procedures around it. My former bugs verification team still seems to exist and even get some new members. Moreover, today we have less …

[Read more]
Porting this Oracle MySQL feature to MariaDB would be great ;-)

Oracle has done a great technical work with MySQL. Specifically a nice job has been done around security. There is one useful feature that exists in Oracle MySQL and that currently does not exist in MariaDB. Oracle MySQL offers the possibility from within the server to generate asymetric key pairs. It is then possible use [...]

Another Day, Another Data Leak

In the last few days, there has been information released about yet another alleged data leak, placing in jeopardy “…[the] personal information on hundreds of millions of American adults, as well as millions of businesses.” In this case, the “victim” was Exactis, for whom data collection and data security are core business functions.

Some takeaways from Exactis

Please excuse the pun! In security, we have few chances to chuckle. In fact, as a Security Architect, I sigh deeply when I read about this kind of issue. Firstly, it’s preventable. Secondly, I worry that if an organization like Exactis is not getting it right, what chance the rest of the world?

As the Wired article notes the tool https://shodan.io/ can be revealing and well worth a look. For example, you …

[Read more]
Webinar 6/28: Securing Database Servers From External Attacks

Please join Percona’s Chief Evangelist Colin Charles on Thursday, June 28th, 2018, as he presents Securing Database Servers From External attacks at 7:00 AM PDT (UTC-7) / 10:00 AM EDT (UTC-4).

Register Now

 

A critical piece of your infrastructure is the database tier, yet people don’t pay enough attention to it judging by how many are bitten via poorly chosen defaults, or just a lack understanding of running a secure database tier. In this talk, I’ll focus on MySQL/MariaDB, PostgreSQL, and MongoDB, and cover external authentication, auditing, encryption, SSL, firewalls, replication, and more gems from over a decade of consulting in this space from Percona’s 4,000+ …

[Read more]
Lock Down: Enforcing SELinux with Percona XtraDB Cluster

Why do I spend time blogging about security frameworks? Because, although there are some resources available on the Web, none apply to Percona XtraDB Cluster (PXC) directly. Actually, I rarely encounter a MySQL setup where SELinux is enforced and never when Percona XtraDB Cluster (PXC) or another Galera replication implementation is used. As we’ll see, there are good reasons for that. I originally thought this post would be a simple “how to” but it ended up with a push request to modify the SST script and a few other surprises.

Some context

These days, with all the major security breaches of the last few years, the importance of security in IT cannot be highlighted enough. For that reason, …

[Read more]
The connection_control plugin : Keeping brute force attack in check

To quote book of all knowledge:

In cryptography, a brute-force attack consists of an attacker trying many
passwords or passphrases with the hope of eventually guessing correctly.
The attacker systematically checks all possible passwords and passphrases
until the correct one is found.

This Week in Data with Colin Charles 42: Security Focus on Redis and Docker a Timely Reminder to Stay Alert

Join Percona Chief Evangelist Colin Charles as he covers happenings, gives pointers and provides musings on the open source database community.

Much of last week, there was a lot of talk around this article: New research shows 75% of ‘open’ Redis servers infected. It turns out, it helps that one should always read beyond the headlines because they tend to be more sensationalist than you would expect. From the author of Redis, I highly recommend reading Clarifications on the Incapsula Redis security report, because it turns out that in this case, it is beyond the headline. The content is also suspect. Antirez had to write this to help the press (we totally need to help keep reportage accurate).

Not to depart from the Redis world just yet, but …

[Read more]
PXC loves firewalls (and System Admins loves iptables)

Let them stay together.

In the last YEARS, I have seen quite often that users, when installing a product such as PXC, instead of spending five minutes to understand what to do just run

iptables -F

  and save.

In short, they remove any rules for their firewall.

With this post, I want to show you how easy it can be to do the right thing instead of putting your server at risk. I’ll show you how a slightly more complex setup like PXC (compared to MySQL), can be easily achieved without risky shortcuts.

iptables is the utility used to manage the chains of rules used by the Linux kernel firewall, which is your basic security tool.
Linux comes with a wonderful firewall built into the kernel. As an administrator, you can configure this firewall with interfaces like ipchains  — which we are not going to cover — and iptables, which we shall talk about.

iptables is …

[Read more]
Monitor Critical Databases Confidently with the Sensitive Data Vault

Building extremely deep monitoring as a SaaS product has a drawback: we capture too much data for some customers’ compliance requirements. As a result, some companies have been unable to deploy us, or have had to redact data before sending it to our cloud platform. To address this, we built the Sensitive Data Vault, a highly secure, completely on-premises storage module for the most critically private data that must never leave the customer’s firewall.

 

What is it?

The VividCortex Sensitive Data Vault is a new component of the overall VividCortex solution that you deploy inside your firewall. It ensures that the data never leaves your servers and never enters the VividCortex cloud environment. It consists of:

  • a Go service that the VividCortex collector agent communicates with
  • a customer-maintained MySQL or PostgreSQL database that the Go application uses
[Read more]
Showing entries 1 to 10 of 427
10 Older Entries »