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Displaying posts with tag: encryption (reset)
Performance Evaluation of SST Data Transfer: With Encryption (Part 2)

In this blog post, we’ll look at the performance of SST data transfer using encryption.

In my previous post, we reviewed SST data transfer in an unsecured environment. Now let’s take a closer look at a setup with encrypted network connections between the donor and joiner nodes.

The base setup is the same as the previous time:

  • Database server: Percona XtraDB Cluster 5.7 on donor node
  • Database: sysbench database – 100 tables 4M rows each (total ~122GB)
  • Network: donor/joiner hosts are connected with dedicated 10Gbit LAN
  • Hardware: donor/joiner hosts – boxes with 28 Cores+HT/RAM 256GB/Samsung SSD 850/Ubuntu 16.04

The setup details for the encryption aspects in our testing:

  • Cryptography libraries: openssl-1.0.2, …
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Howto Encrypt MySQL Backups on S3

TwinDB Backup supports encrypted backup copies since version 2.11.0. As usual the tool supports natively backup and restore operations, if backup copies are encrypted the tool takes care of decryption.

Installing TwinDB Packages repository

I will work with CentOS 7 system to show the example, but there are also packages for Ubuntu trusty and Debian jessie.

We host our packages in PackageCloud which provides a great installation guide if you need to install the repo via puppet, chef etc. The manual way is pretty straightforward as well. A PackageCloud script installs and configures the repository.

curl -s https://packagecloud.io/install/repositories/twindb/main/script.rpm.sh | sudo bash

Installing twindb-backup

Once the repository is ready it’s time to install the tool.

yum install …
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An Introduction to MariaDB’s Data at Rest Encryption (DARE) – Part 2

Okay, so you’ve read the first post on enabling MariaDB’s data at rest encryption, and now you are ready to create an encrypted table.

And just to get it out of the way for those interested, you can always check your encrypted (and non-encrypted) table stats via:

SELECT * FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.INNODB_TABLESPACES_ENCRYPTION;

ENCRYPTION_SCHEME=1 means the table is encrypted and ENCRYPTION_SCHEME=0 means they are not.

But let’s get into some specific examples.

I find the following 4 tables interesting, as the first 3 essentially all create the same table, and the 4th shows how to create a non-encrypted table once you have encryption enabled.

CREATE TABLE t10 (id int) ENGINE=INNODB;
CREATE TABLE t11 (id int) ENGINE=INNODB ENCRYPTED=YES;
CREATE TABLE t12 (id int) …
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An Introduction to MariaDB’s Data at Rest Encryption (DARE) – Part 1

Encryption is becoming more and more prevalent and increasingly necessary in today’s world, so I wanted to provide a good overall “getting started” article on using MariaDB’s data at rest encryption (DARE) for anyone out there interested in setting this up in their environment.

MariaDB’s data encryption at rest manual page covers a lot of the specifics, but I wanted to create a quick start guide and also note a few items that might not be immediately obvious.

And due to the number of my examples, I’m splitting this into two posts. The first will focus solely on setting up encryption so you can use it. The second will focus on using it with a number of examples and common use cases.

Also, I feel that I should mention from the outset that, currently, this data at rest encryption only applies to InnoDB/XtraDB tables and Aria …

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Encrypt your –defaults-file

Encrypt your credentials using GPG

This blog post will look how to use encryption to secure your database credentials.

In the recent blog post Use MySQL Shell Securely from Bash, there are some good examples of how you might avoid using a ~/.my.cnf – but you still need to put that password down on disk in the script. MySQL 5.6.6 and later introduced the  –login-path option, which is a handy way to store per-connection entries and keep the credentials in an encrypted format. This is a great improvement, but as shown in Get MySQL Passwords in Plain Text from .mylogin.cnf, …

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MySQL encrypted streaming backups directly into AWS S3

Overview

Cloud storage is becoming more and more popular for offsite storage and DR solutions for many businesses. This post will help with those people that want to perform this process for MySQL backups directly into Amazon S3 Storage. These steps can probably also be adapted for other processes that may not be MySQL oriented.

Steps

In order to perform this task we need to be able to stream the data, encrypt it, and then upload it to S3. There are a number of ways to do each step and I will try and dive into multiple examples so that way you can mix and match the solution to your desired results.  The AWS S3 CLI tools that I will be using to do the upload also allows encryption but to try and get these steps open for customization, I am going to do the encryption in the stream.

  1. Stream MySQL backup
  2. Encrypt the stream
  3. Upload the stream to AWS S3

Step 1 : …

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Restricting Connections to Secure Transport

MySQL 5.7 makes secure connections easier with streamlined key generation for both MySQL Community and MySQL Enterprise, improves security by expanding support for TLSv1.1 and TLSv1.2, and helps administrators assess whether clients are connecting securely or not with new visibility into connection types. …

Simplified SSL/TLS Setup for MySQL Community

Transport Layer Security (TLS, also often referred to as SSL) is an important component of a secure MySQL deployment, but the complexities of properly generating the necessary key material and configuring the server dissuaded many users from completing this task.  MySQL Server 5.7 simplifies this task for both Enterprise and Community users. …

Secure Java Connections by Default

MySQL Connector/Java 5.1.38 was released earlier this week, and it includes a notable improvement related to secure connections.  Here’s how the change log describes it:

When connecting to a MySQL server 5.7 instance that supports TLS, Connector/J now prefers a TLS over a plain TCP connection.

This mirrors changes made in 5.7 to the behavior of MySQL command-line clients and libmysql client library.  Coupled with the streamlined/automatic generation of TLS key material to ensure TLS availability in MySQL Server 5.7 deployments, this is an important step towards providing secure communication in default deployments.

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SSL/TLS Improvements in MySQL 5.7.10

Secure communications is a core component of a robust security policy, and MySQL Server 5.7.10 – the first maintenance release of MySQL Server 5.7 – introduces needed improvements in this area.  Support for TLS has been expanded from TLSv1.0 to include TLSv1.1 and TLSv1.2, default ciphers have been updated, and controls have been implemented allowing both server and client-side configuration of acceptable TLS protocol versions.  This blog post will describe the changes, the context in which these changes were made, note important differences in capabilities between Community and Enterprise versions, and outline future plans.

Context

SSL (Secure Sockets Layer)  was superseded by TLS ( …

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