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Displaying posts with tag: devops (reset)
Setting Up Databases in your Development Environment

Setting up databases in development environments can be challenging.

Normally, what I usually see is some automated process for setting up empty databases with up-to-date data structures. This is helpful for integration testing, but is tricky for actual development as well as performance testing. 
For example:

  • It is difficult to conceptually get your head around writing a query when you cannot see any data in your tables
  • You cannot possibly know if your query is slow before you deploying it to production without running it against 'some' data.

Relevant Post: How to Not be the One that Deploys that Slow Query to Production
In addition, there can be a strict requirement to not let sensitive customer data be available outside certain secure environments and …

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“Look: I/O thread is waiting for disk space!”

MySQL 8.0.1 introduced a work with replication threads mutexes in order to improve performance. In MySQL 8.0.2 the same work was extended, focusing in usability, and revamped how replication deals with disk-full conditions, improving the responsiveness of both monitoring commands and administrative commands such as KILL, as well as making status messages much more precise and helpful.…

Scale With Maxscale – Part 3 (Replication)

This blog post is continuation of series of blog post on Maxscale, Part-1 which provides detailed introductory to Maxscale, Part-2 deals about the operation and administration of Maxscale. In this we will discusses, How Maxscale can be efficiently used for read scaling with mysql replication (Master – Slave).

Replication is a great feature which is having a great journey along with mysql history. With the introduction of row based replication in 5.1 replication capabilities has stabilised and now with the latest 5.7 we can have enhance multi-threaded replication , semi-synchronous replication.

Speaking of great performance improvement in replication, Even …

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You QA Most of Your System — What About Your Database?

For virtually all development teams, testing code is a given: It's one of the most important parts of software development. Whether your organization includes a separate team devoted to QA, or your developers are testing their own code, QA is the primary way your team ensures that your application's logic is working correctly, and it's the best way for you to identify issues as early as possible.

As a result, QA is critical for engineering velocity, and it helps shape your users' overall experience when engaging with your product. Nobody likes finding a broken app or website. But what about quality assurance for a database? Do most teams apply the same QA practices to improve their data tier? Do many teams even know how to perform database QA? In this article, we'll talk about how you and your team can apply the same high standards of QA principles to your database, which many organizations often overlook.


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A Quick Look at Parallel Rsync and How it Can Save a System Hours

In this post, we'll take a quick look at rsync ("remote sync") and parallel rysnc—a way to increase the efficiency and speed of traditional rsync. At VividCortex, we've found each to be effective and handy at various times.

Image Credit

Rsync is a tool for copying files between volumes in the same or separate servers. The advantage of rsync is that instead of copying data blindly, it compares the source and destination directories, so that only the difference between the two is sent through the network (or between volumes). 

Rsync can still be slow in certain situations, however—especially when there's a high volume of data that needs to be copied. In such a case, the process can take hours. Additionally, if the volume io has high latency—such as when cold Amazon EBS volumes are involved—the throughput can …

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Docker, MySQL and Experience in Containers

Recently I posted a blog on my time attending a DevOps event in Toronto.  In that blog I had intended to focus on the conference and highlight some of the topics that stood out for me.  In this blog though, I wanted to share what others were doing with containers like Docker, and particularly and… Read More »

DevOpsDays Toronto: Community, Collaboration and Supporting the change in IT

I recently attended DevOpsDays Toronto 2017, my first proper DevOpsDaysTO event.  I had the pleasure of attending and being able to immerse myself in this openly collaborative and supportive culture of IT professionals.  The variety of considerations expressed for delivering software features in a rapidly, frequently and reliable release focused manner was really intriguing….but not without its own complexities.… Read More »

A roughneck walk down database alley

via GIPHY I was just responding to some Disqus comments on a recent blog post. Admittedly it had a provocative title Will SQL databases just die already. What do you think? Join 34,000 others and follow Sean Hull on twitter @hullsean. A reader pointed out that some No-SQL databases do support joins. Huh? My face … Continue reading A roughneck walk down database alley →

MySQL InnoDB Cluster: Automated Installation with Puppet

We saw yesterday that the new MySQL Shell was out and how we could create a MySQL InnoDB Cluster manually using the Shell.

Today, I would like to show you how easy it is to create recipes to automate all the process. I have created a Puppet module that can be used as Proof-of-concept (You might need more features to use it in production, feel free to fork it).

The module can be found on this github repo.

When using Puppet, I really like to put all configuration in hiera.

Environment

We have 3 GNU/Linux servers: mysql1, mysql2 and mysql3.

We won’t install anything related to MySQL manually, everything will be handled by Puppet.

Nodes definition …

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Monitoring MySQL Health and Performance with Netsil

MySQL continues to be one of the most popular databases used in cloud-native applications. In fact, MySQL is so popular that other cloud databases such as AWS Aurora maintain wire protocol compatibility with MySQL. For SREs and DevOps engineers running MySQL database in production, it is crucial to understand how to monitor MySQL. MySQL poor health can lead to cascading effects on other application components. For example, slow queries can impact page load times for an application, or missing indexes can result in high-latency and application time-outs. By effectively monitoring the performance of databases and query executions, SREs and DevOps can identify if there are bottlenecks in the database tier which affect the overall application performance. With this appreciation for the importance of MySQL monitoring, let us quickly survey what techniques are commonly used for MySQL monitoring and then discuss …

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