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Displaying posts with tag: MySQL 5.7 (reset)
ProxySQL Series: MySQL Replication Read-write Split up.

At Mydbops we always thrive to provide the best MySQL Solutions. We are exploring the modern SQL load balancers. We have planned to write a series of blog on ProxySQL.

The first blog in this series is  how to set up ProxySQL for MySQL Replication Topology including Read / Write Split and some background over ProxySQL.

What is ProxySQL ?

  • ProxySQL is a open-source high-performance SQL aware proxy. It runs as a daemon watched by a monitoring process.
  • ProxySQL seats between application and db servers.
  • The daemon accepts incoming traffic from MySQL clients and forwards it to backend MySQL servers.

A few most commonly used features are : …

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More Write Set in MySQL: Group Replication Certification

This is the third post in the series on Write Set in MySQL.  In the first post, we explore how Write Set allows to get better parallel replication in MySQL 8.0.  In the second post, we saw how the MySQL 8.0 improvement is an extension of the work done in MySQL 5.7 to avoid replication delay/lag in Group Replication.  In this post, we will see how Write Set is used in Group Replication to detect

Write Set in MySQL 5.7: Group Replication

In my previous post, I write that Write Set is not only in MySQL 8.0 but also in MySQL 5.7 though a little hidden.  In this post, I describe Write Set in 5.7 and this will bring us in the inner-working of Group Replication.  I am also using this opportunity to explain and show why members of a group can replicate faster than a standard slave.  We will also see the impacts, on Group Replication,

Disabling Multi-Source Replication in MySQL 5.7

Multi-channel replication is one of the  great feature shipped with MySQL 5.7, With allowed the capability of slave to have many masters, having a channel for each master by which they replicate. Each channel id has a unique “channel_name” Multi-Channel ReplicationIn the above DB Architecture “channel_1, channel_2 and channel_3” represent the channel_name used for replication from different MySQL servers ( Source ). In this blog we are not going see about configuration of multi_source replication, rather we are going to see about rolling back multi-source replication in MySQL. Recently we were working on a client, where we had deployed multi-channel replication replication from two master onto a single slave, sync was happening very fine Then came the situation to break the replication from two channel and make …

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Overview of the MySQL Server Architecture

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Sometimes it can be useful to take a step back and look at the world from a bit larger distance than usual. So in this blog, I will take a look at the high level architecture of MySQL Server.

Info This is meant as a simplified overview and does not include all details.

Overview of the MySQL Server Architecture

For the discussion I will be referring to the the following figure that shows some of the features and plugins of MySQL. Orange boxes are available both for the community version and the commercial (enterprise) version, whereas red means the plugin is exclusive for the commercial version. Ellipsoid elements are …

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MySQL, Percona Server for MySQL and MariaDB Default Configuration Differences

In this blog post, I’ll discuss some of the MySQL and MariaDB default configuration differences, focusing on MySQL 5.7 and MariaDB 10.2. Percona Server for MySQL uses the same defaults as MySQL, so I will not list them separately.

MariaDB Server is a general purpose open source database, created by the founders of MySQL. MariaDB Server (referred to as MariaDB for brevity) has similar roots as Percona Server for MySQL, but is quickly diverging from MySQL compatibility and growing on its own. MariaDB has become the default installation for several operating systems (such as Red Hat Enterprise Linux/CentOS/Fedora). Changes in the default variables can make a large difference in the out-of-box …

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Xtrabackup for handling Encrypted Tablespace

      ​In this post, we are going to see how we can backup encrypted tables using Xtrabackup. InnoDB supports data encryption for InnoDB tables stored in file per table tablespaces. For the application to access encrypted tablespace, InnoDB will use master encryption key to decrypt the tablespace key. The master encryption key is stored in a keyring file in the location specified by the key_ring_file_data configuration option. We have already discussed on enabling encrypted tablespace. Here, we will try full and incremental backups of encrypted tablespace.

Percona xtrabackup supports encrypted innodb tablespace backups. While taking backup, we have to add options –keyring-file-data and –server-id. After the completion of the backup, we have to use the same options to prepare the backup. Below is an example of encrypted table,

 

Backup can be taken without using –keyring-file-data and …

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Taming a ‘wild’ NDB 7.3 with Cluster Manager 1.4.3 & direct upgrade to 7.5.

Well, since working with outdated clusters and upgrade paths that quickly become obsolete, as in my last post, Migrating/importing NDB to Cluster Manager w/ version upgrade. , I wanted to share that we can also use Cluster Manager, mcm, to upgrade NDB Cluster from 7.3 directly to 7.5. So we can start using the mcm new features like autotune that help guide us towards some Cluster tuning, or 7.5 new features like READ_BACKUP or FULLY_REPLICATED tables. …

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The danger of no Primary Key when replicating in RBR (and a partial protection with MariaDB 10.1)

TL;DR: unless you know what you are doing, you should always have a primary key on your tables when replicating in RBR (and maybe even all the time).

TL;DR2: MariaDB 10.1 has an interesting way to protect against missing a primary key (innodb_force_primary_key) but it could be improved.

A few weeks ago, I was called off hours because replication delay on all the slaves from a replication chain

Learning MySQL 5.7: Q & A

In this post I’ll answer questions I received in my Wednesday, July 19, 2017, webinar Learning MySQL 5.7!

First, thank you all who attended the webinar. The link to the slides and the webinar recording can be found here.

I received a number of interesting questions in the webinar that I’ve followed up with below.

Would there be a big difference on passing from 5.1 to 5.6 before going to 5.7 or, at this point, would it be roughly the same?

The biggest risk of jumping between versions, in this case 5.1 to 5.6, is reverting in case of problems. Rollbacks don’t happen often, but they do happen and you have to make …

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