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Displaying posts with tag: RDS (reset)
Database Objects migration to RDS/ Aurora (AWS)

The world of application and its related services are migrating more towards cloud, because of availability, Elasticity, Manageability etc. While moving the entire stack we need to be very cautious while migrating the database part.

Migration of DB servers is not a simple lift and shift operation, Rather it would require a proper planning and more cautious in maintaining data consistency with existing DB server and cloud server by means of native replication or by using any third party tools.

The best way to migrate the existing MySQL database to RDS, in my opinion, is by using “logical backup“. Some of the logical backup tools as below,

Mysqldump — single threaded (widely used)

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When Should I Use Amazon Aurora and When Should I use RDS MySQL?

Now that Database-as-a-service (DBaaS) is in high demand, there is one question regarding AWS services that cannot always be answered easily : When should I use Aurora and when RDS MySQL?

DBaaS cloud services allow users to use databases without configuring physical hardware and infrastructure, and without installing software. I’m not sure if there is a straightforward answer, but when trying to find out which solution best fits an organization there are multiple factors that should be taken into consideration. These may be performance, high availability, operational cost, management, capacity planning, scalability, security, monitoring, etc.

There are also cases where although the workload and operational needs seem to best fit to one solution, there are other limiting factors which may be blockers (or at least need special handling).

In this blog post, I will try to provide some general rules …

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How to Automate Minor Version Upgrades for MySQL on RDS

Amazon RDS for MySQL offers the option to automate minor version upgrades using the minor version upgrade policy, a property that lets you decide if Amazon is allowed to perform the upgrades on your behalf. Usually the goal is not to upgrade automatically every RDS instance but to keep up to date automatically non-production deployments. This helps you address engine issues as soon as possible and improve the automation of the deployment process.

If your are using the AWS Command Line Interface (CLI) and you have an instance called test-rds01 it is as simple as changing

[--auto-minor-version-upgrade | --no-auto-minor-version-upgrade]

For example:

aws rds modify-db-instance --db-instance-identifier test-rds01 --apply-immediately …
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Reading Amazon RDS MySQL/Aurora log file from terminal.

Introduction:

At Mydbops we support a good number of clients on AWS cloud (Aurora and RDS).

Amazon Relational Database Service (RDS) is providing the cloud based database service. It is the cost-efficient, resize able & ease to manage. As in any other DBaaS, If you need to analyse the log files (Error log / Slow log), you need to login the console and manually download the files.

Logging into the console seems simple, But this is a bit complex operation when it comes to incorporate that in a day to day operation and automation. In this blog i would like to share my experience in making this into a straightforward process for downloading the log files directly from command line without console GUI.

Prerequisites:

Following tools are to be installed for this operation.

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RDS Aurora MySQL Cost

I promised to do a pricing post on the Amazon RDS Aurora MySQL pricing, so here we go.  All pricing is noted in USD (we’ll explain why)

We compared pricing of equivalent EC2+EBS server instances, and verified our calculation model with Amazon’s own calculator and examples.  We use the pricing for Australia (Sydney data centre). Following are the relevant Amazon pricing pages from which we took the pricing numbers, formulae, and calculation examples:

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RDS Aurora MySQL and Service Interruptions

In Amazon space, any EC2 or Service instance can “disappear” at any time.  Depending on which service is affected, the service will be automatically restarted.  In EC2 you can choose whether an interrupted instance will be restarted, or left shutdown.

For an Aurora instance, an interrupted instance is always restarted. Makes sense.

The restart timing, and other consequences during the process, are noted in our post on Aurora Failovers.

Aurora Testing Limitations

As mentioned earlier, we love testing “uncontrolled” failovers.  That is, we want to be able to pull any plug on any service, and see that the environment as a whole continues to do its job.  We can’t do that with Aurora, because we can’t control the essentials:

  • power button;
  • reset switch;
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Scale with Maxscale part-4 (Amazon Aurora)

This is part-4 of the Maxscale Blog series

  1. Maxscale and Galera
  2. Maxscale Basic Administration
  3. Maxscale for Replication

Maxscale started supporting Amazon Aurora lately from its version 2.1 which comes with a BSL license, we are good until we use only 3 nodes, …

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RDS Aurora MySQL Failover

Right now Aurora only allows a single master, with up to 15 read-only replicas.

Master/Replica Failover

We love testing failure scenarios, however our options for such tests with Aurora are limited (we might get back to that later).  Anyhow, we told the system, through the RDS Aurora dashboard, to do a failover. These were our observations:

Role Change Method

Both master and replica instances are actually restarted (the MySQL uptime resets to 0).

This is quite unusual these days, we can do a fully controlled role change in classic asynchronous replication without a restart (CHANGE MASTER TO …), and Galera doesn’t have read/write roles as such (all instances are technically writers) so it doesn’t need role changes at all.

Failover Timing

Failover between running instances takes about 30 seconds.  This is in line with information provided in the …

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Exploring Amazon RDS Aurora: replica writes and cache chilling

Our clients operate on a variety of platforms, and RDS (Amazon Relational Database Service) Aurora has received quite a bit of attention in recent times. On behalf of our clients, we look beyond the marketing, and see what the technical architecture actually delivers.  We will address specific topics in individual posts, this time checking out what the Aurora architecture means for write and caching behaviour (and thus performance).

What is RDS Aurora?

First of all, let’s declare the baseline.  MySQL Aurora is not a completely new RDBMS. It comprises a set of Amazon modifications on top of stock Oracle MySQL 5.6 and 5.7, implementing a different replication mechanism and some other changes/additions.  While we have some information (for instance from the “deep dive” by AWS VP Anurag Gupta), the source code of the Aurora modifications …

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How to Enable Binary Logging on an Amazon RDS Read Replica

One of the more common struggles I’ve had to assist with in regard to Amazon RDS is enabling binary logging on read replicas, or forming multi-tier replication in instances using version 5.6 or later after seeing that multi-tier replication is not supported in version 5.5 (for a reason that will become clear by the end of this post.)

First off, let’s have a look at the topology that I have in place in my AWS account. As you’ll see below I have a master, blog1, and a read replica that I created via the AWS console called blog2. You’ll also notice that, despite being supported, if I select instance actions while having blog2 highlighted the option to create a read replica is grayed out.

Further, if we use the MySQL CLI to connect to blog2 and check the global variables for log_bin and binlog_format, you’ll see that binary logging is off and binlog_format is set to statement. This is strange considering that the parameter …

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