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Displaying posts with tag: RDS (reset)
Percona Support with Amazon RDS

This blog post will give a brief overview of Amazon RDS capabilities and limitations, and how Percona Support can help you succeed in your Amazon RDS deployments.

One of the common questions that we get from customers and prospective customers is about Percona Support with Amazon RDS. As many companies have shifted to the cloud, or are considering how to do so, it’s natural to try to understand the limitations inherent in different deployment strategies.

Why Use Amazon RDS?

As more companies move to using the cloud, we’ve seen a shift towards work models in technical teams that require software developers to take on more operational duties than they have traditionally. This makes it essential to abstract infrastructure so it can be interacted with as code, whether through automation or APIs. Amazon RDS presents a compelling DBaaS product with significant flexibility while maintaining ease of deployment.

Use …

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How to Configure Aurora RDS Parameters

In this blog post, we’ll look at some tips on how to configure Aurora RDS parameters.

I was recently deploying a few Aurora RDS instances, a process very similar to configuring a regular RDS instance. I noticed a few minor differences in the way you configure Aurora RDS parameters, and very few articles on how the commands should be structured (for RDS as well as Aurora). The only real literature available is the official Amazon RDS documentation.

This blog provides a concise “how-to” guide to quickly change Aurora RDS parameters using the AWS CLI. Aurora retains the parameter group model introduced with RDS, with new instances having the default read only parameter groups. For a new instance, you need to create and allocate a new parameter group (this requires a DB reboot). After that, you can apply changes to …

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How to interview an amazon database expert

via GIPHY Amazon releases a new database offering every other day. It sure isn’t easy to keep up. Join 35,000 others and follow Sean Hull on twitter @hullsean. Let’s say you’re hiring a devops & you want to suss out their database knowledge? Or you’re hiring a professional services firm or freelance consultant. Whatever the … Continue reading How to interview an amazon database expert →

RDS vs Aurora vs EC2 benchmark

The goal of the benchmark is to compare performance and price/performance of Amazon RDS (Aurora) and MySQL server running on EC2 instance. MySQL versions MySQL 5.6 on RDS Aurora on RDS MySQL 5.6 community version on EC2 MySQL 5.7 community version on EC2 Sysbench test Primary Key lookup queries OLTP workload with mix of SELECT, […]

The post RDS vs Aurora vs EC2 benchmark appeared first on TwinDB.

Monitoring Amazon RDS: Beyond Raw Logs

Amazon Relational Database Service (RDS) is a hosted database service in the AWS cloud. If your organization’s data is stored in one of the popular database systems, but on a company server or perhaps you’re renting a dedicated server, you might want to consider switching to Amazon RDS.  With Amazon RDS, you can choose from several relational database systems:  MySQL, MariaDB, Oracle, Postgres, and SQL Server, as well as Amazon Aurora.

There are many advantages to Amazon RDS, such as server scaling and load balancing of user traffic. Best of all, it can reduce the operational costs of running database software like MySQL. With Amazon RDS, you don’t need to worry about performing security updates, patching the operating system, or tuning the database. In fact, some of the patches Amazon deploys for MySQL and MariaDB are specifically designed to get better performance in a cloud setting.  Let’s look at some major …

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What products & improvements are new on AWS?

Amazon is releasing new products & services to it’s global cloud compute network at a rate that has all of our heads spinning. Join 32,000 others and follow Sean Hull on twitter @hullsean. Here’s new stuff worth mentioning around databases & data. 1. For ETL – AWS GLUE Moving data from your transactional MySQL or … Continue reading What products & improvements are new on AWS? →

Creating An External Slave For A Live AWS Aurora Instance

Overview

When working with Amazon AWS Aurora, there are some steps to consider when trying to get data out of an active Aurora master into a slave, potentially into a EC2 instance or offsite in another data centre. Creating an external mysql to Aurora gives the option to move out of Aurora, or to have the flexibility to move data around as desired. With AWS RDS instances this task is pretty simple because you can do the following :

  1. Create a read replica
  2. Stop the slave process
  3. Capture the positioning
  4. Dump the database

With Aurora it’s a little trickier, because a read replica in Aurora has no slave process. All of the replication is handled on the back end and cannot be controlled. However, setting up an external slave can be done.

Amazon AWS Documentation

In …

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Amazon RDS updates February 2016

I think one of the big announcements that came out from the Amazon Web Services world in October 2015 was the fact that you could spin up instances of MariaDB Server on it. You would get MariaDB Server 10.0.17. As of this writing, you are still getting that (the MySQL shipping then was 5.6.23, and today you can create a 5.6.27 instance, but there were no .24/.25/.26 releases). I’m hoping that there’s active work going on to make MariaDB Server 10.1 available ASAP on the platform.

Just last week you would have noticed that Amazon has rolled out MySQL 5.7.10. The in-place upgrades are not available yet, so updating …

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MySQL RDS Point-in-time restore

RDS for MySQL on AWS allows you to restore to any point in time for your backup retention period, minus the last 5 minutes or so. Restoration creates a new instance, it does not overwrite whatever instance you’re restoring. AWS’s use of the word restore is a bit confusing because restore often means “take your production database server and overwrite it with data from a backup”. As far as I can tell, Amazon never means this. When you restore, AWS creates another database server and writes all the data to the new instance, both when you’re using restoring to a point-in-time or from a DB snapshot. If you needed to switch servers, you’d have to point your database to the new instance.

Reference

5 core pieces of the Amazon Cloud puzzle to get your project off the ground

One of the most common engagements I do is working with firms in and around the NYC startup sector. I evaluate AWS infrastructures & applications built in the Amazon cloud. Join 32,000 others and follow Sean Hull on twitter @hullsean. I’ve seen some patterns in customers usage of Amazon. Below is a laundry list of … Continue reading 5 core pieces of the Amazon Cloud puzzle to get your project off the ground →

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