Showing entries 1 to 10 of 19
9 Older Entries »
Displaying posts with tag: aurora (reset)
Unforeseen use case of my GTID work: replicating from AWS Aurora to Google CloudSQL

A colleague brought an article to my attention.  I did not see it on Planet MySQL where I get most of the MySQL news (or it did not catch my eye there).  As it is interesting replication stuff, I think it is important to bring it to the attention of the MySQL Community, so I am writing this short post.

The surprising part for me is that it uses my 4-year-old work for online migration to GTID

Amazon Aurora Serverless - Features, Limitations, Glitches

Amazon Aurora Serverless — Features, Limitations, Glitches

Finally after an year AWS announced the AWS Aurora Serverless MySQL compatibility. I was expecting that they will release this in the reInvent 2018, but it live now. So now I’m expecting more new features for Aurora servers in the reInvent 2018. I have played with this baby and understood whats is doing and what we can do with that.

Here is the blog from AWS about Aurora Serverless

Aurora Serverless MySQL Generally Available | Amazon Web Services

What is Aurora Serverless?

Aurora serverless provides seamlessly scale up and down its compute and memory. You can pay for how much resources that you have been used. No needs of creating and managing the Read Replica and HA(Multi-AZ).

How Aurora Serverless works? Source: AWS

[Read more]
RDS Aurora MySQL Cost

I promised to do a pricing post on the Amazon RDS Aurora MySQL pricing, so here we go.  All pricing is noted in USD (we’ll explain why)

We compared pricing of equivalent EC2+EBS server instances, and verified our calculation model with Amazon’s own calculator and examples.  We use the pricing for Australia (Sydney data centre). Following are the relevant Amazon pricing pages from which we took the pricing numbers, formulae, and calculation examples:

[Read more]
RDS Aurora MySQL and Service Interruptions

In Amazon space, any EC2 or Service instance can “disappear” at any time.  Depending on which service is affected, the service will be automatically restarted.  In EC2 you can choose whether an interrupted instance will be restarted, or left shutdown.

For an Aurora instance, an interrupted instance is always restarted. Makes sense.

The restart timing, and other consequences during the process, are noted in our post on Aurora Failovers.

Aurora Testing Limitations

As mentioned earlier, we love testing “uncontrolled” failovers.  That is, we want to be able to pull any plug on any service, and see that the environment as a whole continues to do its job.  We can’t do that with Aurora, because we can’t control the essentials:

  • power button;
  • reset switch;
[Read more]
RDS Aurora MySQL Failover

Right now Aurora only allows a single master, with up to 15 read-only replicas.

Master/Replica Failover

We love testing failure scenarios, however our options for such tests with Aurora are limited (we might get back to that later).  Anyhow, we told the system, through the RDS Aurora dashboard, to do a failover. These were our observations:

Role Change Method

Both master and replica instances are actually restarted (the MySQL uptime resets to 0).

This is quite unusual these days, we can do a fully controlled role change in classic asynchronous replication without a restart (CHANGE MASTER TO …), and Galera doesn’t have read/write roles as such (all instances are technically writers) so it doesn’t need role changes at all.

Failover Timing

Failover between running instances takes about 30 seconds.  This is in line with information provided in the …

[Read more]
Exploring Amazon RDS Aurora: replica writes and cache chilling

Our clients operate on a variety of platforms, and RDS (Amazon Relational Database Service) Aurora has received quite a bit of attention in recent times. On behalf of our clients, we look beyond the marketing, and see what the technical architecture actually delivers.  We will address specific topics in individual posts, this time checking out what the Aurora architecture means for write and caching behaviour (and thus performance).

What is RDS Aurora?

First of all, let’s declare the baseline.  MySQL Aurora is not a completely new RDBMS. It comprises a set of Amazon modifications on top of stock Oracle MySQL 5.6 and 5.7, implementing a different replication mechanism and some other changes/additions.  While we have some information (for instance from the “deep dive” by AWS VP Anurag Gupta), the source code of the Aurora modifications …

[Read more]
The State of MySQL High Availability Going in to 2018

High availability for MySQL has become increasingly relevant given the ever increasing rate of adoption and implementation. It’s no secret to anyone in the community that the popularity of MySQL has become noteworthy. I still remember my start with MySQL in the early 5.0 days and people told me that I may not want to consider wasting my time training on a database that didn’t have a large industry adoption, but look at where we are now! One of my favorite pages to cite when trying to exhibit this fact is the db-engines.com ranking trend page where we can see that MySQL is right up there and contending with enterprise products such as Microsoft SQL Server and Oracle.

MySQL has gone from being part of the ever famous LAMP stack for users looking to set up their first website to seeing adoption from major technical players such as …

[Read more]
Percona live Dublin – Migrating and living on RDS/Aurora

It was a long time ago so I won’t write about the conference (it was good as always), but at least I share the slides of my talk here.

Percona Support with Amazon RDS

This blog post will give a brief overview of Amazon RDS capabilities and limitations, and how Percona Support can help you succeed in your Amazon RDS deployments.

One of the common questions that we get from customers and prospective customers is about Percona Support with Amazon RDS. As many companies have shifted to the cloud, or are considering how to do so, it’s natural to try to understand the limitations inherent in different deployment strategies.

Why Use Amazon RDS?

As more companies move to using the cloud, we’ve seen a shift towards work models in technical teams that require software developers to take on more operational duties than they have traditionally. This makes it essential to abstract infrastructure so it can be interacted with as code, whether through automation or APIs. Amazon RDS presents a compelling DBaaS product with significant flexibility while maintaining ease of deployment.

Use …

[Read more]
How to Configure Aurora RDS Parameters

In this blog post, we’ll look at some tips on how to configure Aurora RDS parameters.

I was recently deploying a few Aurora RDS instances, a process very similar to configuring a regular RDS instance. I noticed a few minor differences in the way you configure Aurora RDS parameters, and very few articles on how the commands should be structured (for RDS as well as Aurora). The only real literature available is the official Amazon RDS documentation.

This blog provides a concise “how-to” guide to quickly change Aurora RDS parameters using the AWS CLI. Aurora retains the parameter group model introduced with RDS, with new instances having the default read only parameter groups. For a new instance, you need to create and allocate a new parameter group (this requires a DB reboot). After that, you can apply changes to …

[Read more]
Showing entries 1 to 10 of 19
9 Older Entries »