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Displaying posts with tag: Amazon Aurora (reset)
Adaptive Hash Index on AWS Aurora

Recently I had a case where queries against Aurora Reader were 2-3 times slower than on the Writer node. In this blog post, we are going to discuss why.

I am not going to go into the details of how Aurora works, as there are other blog posts discussing that. Here I am only going to focus on one part.

The Problem

My customer reported there is a huge performance difference between the Reader and the Writer node just by running selects. I was a bit surprised, as the select queries should run locally on the reader node, the dataset could fit easily in memory, there were no reads on disk level, and everything looked fine.

I was trying to rule out every option when one of my colleagues mentioned I should have a look at the InnoDB_Adaptive_Hash_Indexes. He was right – it …

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How to Upgrade Amazon Aurora MySQL from 5.6 to 5.7

Over time, software evolves and it is important to stay up to date if you want to benefit from new features and performance improvements.  Database engines follow the exact same logic and providers are always careful to provide an easy upgrade path. With MySQL, the mysql_upgrade tool serves that purpose.

A database upgrade process becomes more challenging in a managed environment like AWS RDS where you don’t have shell access to the database host and don’t have access to the SUPER MySQL privilege. This post is a collaboration between Fattmerchant and Percona following an engagement focused on the upgrade of the Fattmerchant database from Amazon Aurora MySQL 5.6 to Amazon Aurora MySQL 5.7. Jacques Fu, the CTO of Fattmerchant, is the co-author of this post.  Our initial plan was to follow a path laid out previously by others but we had difficulties finding any …

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Using Parallel Query with Amazon Aurora for MySQL

Parallel query execution is my favorite, non-existent, feature in MySQL. In all versions of MySQL – at least at the time of writing – when you run a single query it will run in one thread, effectively utilizing one CPU core only. Multiple queries run at the same time will be using different threads and will utilize more than one CPU core.

On multi-core machines – which is the majority of the hardware nowadays – and in the cloud, we have multiple cores available for use. With faster disks (i.e. SSD) we can’t utilize the full potential of IOPS with just one thread.

AWS Aurora (based on MySQL 5.6) now has a version which will support parallelism for SELECT queries (utilizing the read capacity of storage nodes underneath the Aurora cluster). In this article, we will look at how this can improve the reporting/analytical query performance in MySQL. I will compare AWS Aurora with MySQL …

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AWS Aurora MySQL – HA, DR, and Durability Explained in Simple Terms

It’s a few weeks after AWS re:Invent 2018 and my head is still spinning from all of the information released at this year’s conference. This year I was able to enjoy a few sessions focused on Aurora deep dives. In fact, I walked away from the conference realizing that my own understanding of High Availability (HA), Disaster Recovery (DR), and Durability in Aurora had been off for quite a while. Consequently, I decided to put this blog out there, both to collect the ideas in one place for myself, and to share them in general. Unlike some of our previous blogs, I’m not focused on analyzing Aurora performance or examining the architecture behind Aurora. Instead, I want to focus on how HA, DR, and Durability are defined and implemented within the Aurora ecosystem.  We’ll get just deep enough into the weeds to be able to examine these capabilities alone.

Aurora MySQL – What is it?

We’ll start with a simplified …

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Amazon Aurora Serverless – The Sleeping Beauty

One of the most exciting features Amazon Aurora Serverless brings to the table is its ability to go to sleep (pause) when idle. This is a fantastic feature for development and test environments. You get access to a powerful database to run tests quickly, but it goes easy on your wallet as you only pay for storage when the instance is paused.

You can configure Amazon RDS Aurora Serverless to go to sleep after a specified period of time. This can be set to anywhere between five minutes and 24 hours

For this feature to work, however, inactivity has to be complete. If you have so much as a single query or even maintain an idle open connection, Amazon Aurora Serverless will not be able to pause.

This means, for example, that pretty much any monitoring you may have enabled, including our own …

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Amazon RDS Aurora MySQL – Differences Among Editions

Amazon Aurora with MySQL Compatibility comes in three editions which, at the time of writing, have quite a few differences around the features that they support.  Make sure you don’t assume the newer Aurora 2.x supports everything in Aurora 1.x. On the contrary, right now Aurora 1.x (MySQL 5.6 based) supports most Aurora features.  The serverless option was launched for this version, and it’s not based on the latest MySQL 5.7.  However, the serverless option, too, has its own set of limitations

I found a concise comparison of what is available in which Amazon Aurora edition hard to come by so I’ve created one.  The table was compiled based mostly on documentation research, so if you spot some mistakes please let me know and I’ll make a correction.

Please keep in mind, this is expected to …

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Percona Database Performance Blog 2018 Year in Review: Top Blog Posts

Let’s look at some of the most popular Percona Database Performance Blog posts in 2018.

The closing of a year lends itself to looking back. And making lists. With the Percona Database Performance Blog, Percona staff and leadership work hard to provide the open source community with insights, technical support, predictions and metrics around multiple open source database software technologies. We’ve had nearly 4 million visits to the blog in 2018: thank you! We look forward to providing you with even better articles, news and information in 2019.

As 2018 moves into 2019, let’s take a quick look back at some of the most popular posts on the blog this year.

Top 10 Most Read

These posts had the most number of views (working down from the highest):

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Amazon RDS Aurora Serverless – The Basics

When I attended AWS Re:Invent 2018, I saw there was a lot of attention from both customers and the AWS team on Amazon RDS Aurora Serverless. So I decided to take a deeper look at this technology, and write a series of blog posts on this topic.

In this first post of the series, you will learn about Amazon Aurora Serverless basics and use cases. In later posts, I will share benchmark results and in depth realization results.

What Amazon Aurora Serverless Is

A great source of information on this topic is How Amazon Aurora Serverless Works from the official AWS  documentation. In this article, you learn what Serverless deployment rather than provisional deployment means. Instead of specifying an instance …

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Migrating to Amazon Aurora: Design for Flexibility

In this Checklist for Success series, we will discuss reducing unknowns when hosting in the cloud using and migrating to Amazon Aurora. These tips might also apply to other database as a service (DBaaS) offerings.

Previous blogs in the migrating to Amazon Aurora series:

The whole premise of a database as a service offering is that you do not need to worry about the operating the …

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Migrating to Amazon Aurora: Optimize for Binary Log Replication

In this Checklist for Success series, we will discuss reducing unknowns when hosting in the cloud using and migrating to Amazon Aurora. These tips might also apply to other database as a service (DBaaS) offerings.

In our previous article, we discussed the importance of continuous query performance analysis, especially in Amazon Aurora where there is less diagnostic visibility compared to running on EC2 or on-premise. Aside from uptime though, we need a lot more from our data, and we definitely cannot isolate it in Aurora.

Next on our checklist is that at one point or another, we will need to use asynchronous replication. Amazon Aurora has an excellent reputation for absorbing intense amounts of …

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