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Displaying posts with tag: Cloud and MySQL (reset)
AWS Aurora MySQL – HA, DR, and Durability Explained in Simple Terms

It’s a few weeks after AWS re:Invent 2018 and my head is still spinning from all of the information released at this year’s conference. This year I was able to enjoy a few sessions focused on Aurora deep dives. In fact, I walked away from the conference realizing that my own understanding of High Availability (HA), Disaster Recovery (DR), and Durability in Aurora had been off for quite a while. Consequently, I decided to put this blog out there, both to collect the ideas in one place for myself, and to share them in general. Unlike some of our previous blogs, I’m not focused on analyzing Aurora performance or examining the architecture behind Aurora. Instead, I want to focus on how HA, DR, and Durability are defined and implemented within the Aurora ecosystem.  We’ll get just deep enough into the weeds to be able to examine these capabilities alone.

Aurora MySQL – What is it?

We’ll start with a simplified …

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Migrating to Amazon Aurora: Reduce the Unknowns

Migrating to Amazon Aurora. Shutterstock.com

In this Checklist for Success series, we will discuss reducing unknowns when hosting in the cloud using and migrating to Amazon Aurora. These tips might also apply to other database as a service (DBaaS) offerings.

While DBaaS encapsulates a lot of the moving pieces, it also means relying on this approach for your long-term stability. This encapsulation is a two-edged sword that takes away your visibility into performance outside of the service layer.

Shine a Light on Bad Queries

Bad queries are one of the top offenders of downtime. Aurora doesn’t protect you against them. Performing a query review as part of a routine health check of your workload helps ensure that you do not miss looming issues. It also helps you predict the …

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Maintenance Windows in the Cloud

Recently, I’ve been working with a customer to evaluate the different cloud solutions for MySQL. In this post I am going to focus on maintenance windows and requirements, and what the different cloud platforms offer.

Why is this important at all?

Maintenance windows are required so that the cloud provider can do the necessary updates, patches, and changes to our setup. But there are many questions like:

  • Is this going to impact our production traffic?
  • Is this going to cause any downtime?
  • How long does it take?
  • Any way to avoid it?

Let’s discuss the three most popular cloud provider: AWS, Google, Microsoft. These three each have a MySQL based database service where we can compare the maintenance settings.

AWS

When you create an instance you can define your maintenance window. It’s a 30 minutes block when AWS can update and restart …

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Scaling IO-Bound Workloads for MySQL in the Cloud

Is increasing GP2 volumes size or increasing IOPS for IO1 volumes a valid method for scaling IO-Bound workloads? In this post I’ll focus on one question: how much can we improve performance if we use faster cloud volumes? This post is a continuance of previous cloud research posts:

To recap, in Amazon EC2 we can use gp2 and io1 volumes. gp2 performance can be scaled with size, i.e for gp2 volume size of 500GB we get 1500 iops; size 1000GB – 3000 iops; and for 3334GB – 10000 iops (maximal …

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Webinar Wed 8/29: Databases in the Hosted Cloud

Please join Percona’s Chief Evangelist, Colin Charles on Wednesday, August 29th, 2018, as he presents Databases in the Hosted Cloud at 7:00 AM PDT (UTC-7) / 10:00 AM EDT (UTC-4).

Register Now

 

Nearly everyone today uses some form of database in the hosted cloud. You can use hosted MySQL, MariaDB, Percona Server, and PostgreSQL in several cloud providers as a database as a service (DBaaS).

In this webinar, Colin Charles explores how to efficiently deploy a cloud database configured for optimal performance, with a particular focus on MySQL.

You’ll learn the differences between the various public cloud offerings for Amazon RDS including Aurora, Google Cloud SQL, Rackspace OpenStack …

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This Week in Data with Colin Charles 50: Percona Live Europe Sessions, PostgreSQL in Google Cloud

Join Percona Chief Evangelist Colin Charles as he covers happenings, gives pointers and provides musings on the open source database community.

Grading is underway for talks at Percona Live Europe 2018. I understand that by next week you will see the tutorial schedule released. As part of the program committee, I have enjoyed reviewing tutorials, and I reckon there is great competition for the schedule. I suggest you register now, and don’t forget to book your accommodation (need a discount?).

A video worth watching: …

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Using AWS EC2 instance store vs EBS for MySQL: how to increase performance and decrease cost

If you are using large EBS GP2 volumes for MySQL (i.e. 10TB+) on AWS EC2, you can increase performance and save a significant amount of money by moving to local SSD (NVMe) instance storage. Interested? Then read on for a more detailed examination of how to achieve cost-benefits and increase performance from this implementation.

EBS vs Local instance store

We have heard from customers that large EBS GP2 volumes can be affected by short term outages—IO “stalls” where no IO is going in or out for a couple of minutes. Statistically, with so many disks in disk arrays (which back EBS volumes) we can expect frequent disk failures. If we allocate a very large EBS GP2 volume, i.e. 10Tb+, hitting such failure events can be common.

In the case of MySQL/InnoDB, such an IO “stall” will be obvious, particularly with the highly loaded system where MySQL needs to do physical IO. During the stall, you will see all write queries …

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Amazon RDS Multi-AZ Deployments and Read Replicas

Amazon RDS is a managed relational database service that makes it easier to set up, operate, and scale a relational database in the cloud. One of the common questions that we get is “What is Multi-AZ and how it’s different from Read Replica, do I need both?”.  I have tried to answer this question in this blog post and it depends on your application needs. Are you looking for High Availability (HA), read scalability … or both?

Before we go to into detail, let me explain two common terms used with Amazon AWS.

Region – an AWS region is a separate geographical area like US East (N. Virginia), Asia Pacific (Mumbai), EU (London) etc. Each AWS Region has multiple, isolated locations known as Availability Zones.

Availability Zone (AZ) – AZ is simply one or more data …

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When Should I Use Amazon Aurora and When Should I use RDS MySQL?

Now that Database-as-a-service (DBaaS) is in high demand, there is one question regarding AWS services that cannot always be answered easily : When should I use Aurora and when RDS MySQL?

DBaaS cloud services allow users to use databases without configuring physical hardware and infrastructure, and without installing software. I’m not sure if there is a straightforward answer, but when trying to find out which solution best fits an organization there are multiple factors that should be taken into consideration. These may be performance, high availability, operational cost, management, capacity planning, scalability, security, monitoring, etc.

There are also cases where although the workload and operational needs seem to best fit to one solution, there are other limiting factors which may be blockers (or at least need special handling).

In this blog post, I will try to provide some general rules …

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Is Serverless Just a New Word for Cloud-Based?

Serverless is a new buzzword in the database industry. Even though it gets tossed around often, there is some confusion about what it really means and how it really works. Serverless architectures rely on third-party Backend as a Service (BaaS) services. They can also include custom code that is run in managed, ephemeral containers on a Functions as a Service (FaaS) platform. In comparison to traditional Platform as a Service (PaaS) server architecture, where you pay a predetermined sum for your instances, serverless applications benefit from reduced costs of operations and lower complexity. They are also considered to be more agile, allowing for reduced engineering efforts.

In reality, there are still servers in a serverless architecture: they are just being used, managed, and maintained outside of the application. But isn’t that a lot like what cloud providers, such as Amazon RDS, Google Cloud, and Microsoft Azure, are already …

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