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Displaying posts with tag: Hardware and Storage (reset)
The Puzzling Performance of the Samsung 960 Pro

In this blog post, I’ll take a look at the performance of the Samsung 960 Pro SSD NVME.

First, I know the Samsung 960 Pro is a consumer SSD NVME drive, not intended for sustained data center workloads. But the AnandTech review looked good enough that I decided to take it for a test spin to see if it would work well with MySQL benchmarks.

Before that, I decided to do a simple sysbench file IO test to see how the drives handled sustained workloads, and if it would start acting up.

My expectation for a consumer SSD drive is that its write consistency will suffer. Many of those drives can sustain high bursts for short periods of time but have to slow down to keep up with write leveling (and other …

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Using NVMe Command Line Tools to Check NVMe Flash Health

In this blog post, I’ll look at the types of NVMe flash health information you can get from using the NVMe command line tools.

Checking SATA-based drive health is easy. Whether it’s an SSD or older spinning drive, you can use the

smartctl

 command to get a wealth of information about the device’s performance and health. As an example:

root@blinky:/var/lib/mysql# smartctl -A /dev/sda
smartctl 6.5 2016-01-24 r4214 [x86_64-linux-4.4.0-62-generic] (local build)
Copyright (C) 2002-16, Bruce Allen, Christian Franke, www.smartmontools.org
=== START OF READ SMART DATA SECTION ===
SMART Attributes Data Structure revision number: 16
Vendor Specific SMART Attributes with Thresholds:
ID# ATTRIBUTE_NAME          FLAG     VALUE WORST THRESH TYPE      UPDATED  WHEN_FAILED RAW_VALUE
 1 Raw_Read_Error_Rate     0x002f   100   100   000 …
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How to Replace MySQL with Percona Server on a CPanel, WHM VPS or Dedicated Server

In this blog post, we’ll look at how to replace MySQL with Percona Server for MySQL on a CPanel, WHM VPS or dedicated server.

In general, CPanel and WHM have been leaning towards support of MariaDB over other flavors. This is partly due to the upstream repos replacing the MySQL package with MariaDB (for example, on CentOS).

MySQL 5.6 is still supported though, which means they are keeping support for core MySQL products. But if you want to get some extra performance enhancements or enterprise features for free, without getting too many bells and whistles, you might want to install Percona Server.

I’ve done this work on a new dedicated server with the latest WHM and CPanel on CentOS 7, with MySQL 5.6 installed. …

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Three Things to Consider When Thinking About Containers

Containers like Docker and Rocket are getting more popular every day. In my conversations with customers, they consistently ask what containers are and how they can use them in their environment. If you’re as curious as most people, read on. . .

How did this happen?

From what I understand, containers grew out of Google’s (and others’) need for massive horizontal scale. Now, this is hardly a unique problem. At the time there were several different solutions out there that could help deploy and orchestrate the applications and infrastructure necessary to scale — namely virtual machines (VMs) and their orchestration services (like Vmware’s vCenter). At the uber-massive scale that companies like Google were pushing, however, server virtualization had some serious drawbacks. Enter containers. . .

What is a container?

Essentially, the main difference between a container and a virtual …

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Using Ceph with MySQL

Over the last year, the Ceph world drew me in. Partly because of my taste for distributed systems, but also because I think Ceph represents a great opportunity for MySQL specifically and databases in general. The shift from local storage to distributed storage is similar to the shift from bare disks host configuration to LVM-managed disks configuration.

Most of the work I’ve done with Ceph was in collaboration with folks from Red Hat (mainly Brent Compton and Kyle Bader). This work resulted in a number of talks presented at the Percona Live conference in April and the Red Hat Summit San Francisco at the end of June. I could write a lot about using Ceph with databases, and I hope this post …

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Smallest MySQL Server in the World (under $60) which can even make you toast while fixing MySQL bug #2

Introduction
In my last blog post, Internet of Things, Messaging and MySQL, I have showed how to start your own Internet of Things with Particle Photon board. That implementation is great, but requires constant internet (wi-fi) access as the Particle Photon board does not have any local storage. If you do not have a reliable network access (i.e. in some remote places) or need something really small to store your data you can now use Intel Edison. I’ve even install MySQL on Edison, which makes it the smallest (in size) MySQL server in the world! Other options include:

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The Q&A: Creating best-in-class backup solutions for your MySQL environment

Thank you for attending my July 15 webinar, “Creating Best in Class Backup solutions for your MySQL environment.” Due to the amount of content we discussed and some minor technical difficulties faced near the end of webinar we have decided to cover the final two slides of the presentation along with the questions asked by attendees during the webinar via this blog post.

The slides are available for download. And you can watch the webinar in it’s entirety here.

The final two slides were about our tips for having a …

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Update on the InnoDB double-write buffer and EXT4 transactions

In a post, written a few months ago, I found that using EXT4 transactions with the “data=journal” mount option, improves the write performance significantly, by 55%, without putting data at risk. Many people commented on the post mentioning they were not able to reproduce the results and thus, I decided to further investigate in order to find out why my results were different.

So, I ran sysbench benchmarks on a few servers and found when the InnoDB double-write buffer limitations occur and when they don’t. I also made sure some of my colleagues were able to reproduce the results. Basically, in order to reproduce the results you need the following conditions:

  • Spinning disk (no SSD)
  • Enough CPU power
  • A dataset that fits in the InnoDB buffer pool
  • A continuous high write …
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How to improve InnoDB performance by 55% for write-bound loads

During April’s Percona Live MySQL Conference and Expo 2014, I attended a talk on MySQL 5.7 performance an scalability given by Dimitri Kravtchuk, the Oracle MySQL benchmark specialist. He mentioned at some point that the InnoDB double write buffer was a real performance killer. For the ones that don’t know what the innodb double write buffer is, it is a disk buffer were pages are written before being written to the actual data file. Upon restart, pages in the double write buffer are rewritten to their data files if complete. This is to avoid data file corruption with half written pages. I knew it has an impact on performance, on ZFS since it is transactional I always disable it, but I never realized how important the performance impact could be. Back from PLMCE, a friend had dropped home a Dell R320 server, asking …

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Percona Live London 2013: an insider’s view of the schedule

With the close of call for papers earlier this month, the Percona Live London conference committee was in full swing this past week reviewing all of the many submissions for November’s Percona Live London MySQL Conference.

The submissions are far ranging and cover some really interesting topics, making the lineup for Percona Live London really strong! What the committee looks for in a submission is how much “value” a talk will bring to the conference – this is to say it needs to be far more that a product demo. As such, real-world experiences are receiving much more favorable reviews, along with talks that cover methodologies the attendees will …

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