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Displaying posts with tag: database monitoring (reset)
Best Practices to Secure Your MySQL Databases

Author: Robert Agar

MySQL is one of the most popular database platforms in the world. It is widely used to power eCommerce sites and web applications that are essential components of many companies’ business strategies. MySQL databases are often the repository for sensitive customer data gathered while conducting business as well as information regarding internal processes and personnel.

An organization’s databases are responsible for storing and manipulating the information required to keep it operating and competing effectively in their market. They are critically important to a company’s success and need to be guarded and kept secure. The database team comprises an enterprise’s first line of defense and is responsible for implementing security policies and standards that minimize the chances for the systems to be accessed by unauthorized users or exposed to malicious malware.

One of the …

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Fix Problems Proactively with SQL Diagnostic Manager for MySQL (formerly Monyog)

In the conclusion of our blog series, Benefits of SQL Diagnostic Manager for MySQL (formerly Monyog), we explore features of SQL Diagnostic Manager for MySQL that allow database administrators to proactively monitor and manage MySQL and MariaDB servers. If you missed it, feel free to read last week’s post on monitoring MySQL and MariaDB servers.

Fix Problems Proactively with Hundreds of Monitors

SQL Diagnostic Manager for MySQL includes hundreds of monitors that are designed to examine the configuration and security of MySQL and MariaDB servers automatically, identify problems and tuning opportunities, and provides database administrators with specific corrective actions.

Use Advisor Rules

The Advisor Rules feature is a set of best practices that enables database administrators to monitor MySQL …

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Monitoring MySQL and MariaDB Servers

In week 5 of our Benefits of SQL Diagnostic Manager for MySQL (formerly Monyog) blog series, we detail MySQL and MariaDB monitoring features with SQL Diagnostic Manager for MySQL, including real-time monitoring and monitoring MySQL error logs. If you missed it, you can read our previous post on understanding database performance trends.

Fast Startup Time to Start Monitoring

Database administrators can start monitoring MySQL and MariaDB servers in less than a single minute. The unique architecture and low-footprint of SQL Diagnostic Manager for MySQL enable database administrators to install and configure all of the components that are required for monitoring MySQL and MariaDB servers very quickly.

The fast startup time is in sharp contrast with other monitoring and advisory …

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Find, Monitor, and Analyze Problematic SQL Queries – SQL Diagnostic Manager for MySQL (formerly Monyog)

In week 3 of our series, Benefits of SQL Diagnostic Manager for MySQL (formerly Monyog), we discuss how to identify and analyze problematic SQL queries using SQL Diagnostic Manager for MySQL. If you missed it, feel free to read our previous post on Agentless Monitoring and Cloud Readiness.

Find Problematic SQL Queries

MySQL and MariaDB currently lack advanced tools for profiling SQL queries (such as SQL Profiler of Microsoft’ SQL Server). While other monitoring tools for MySQL and MariaDB provide monitoring and advisory information on various system metrics, they do not pinpoint the problematic SQL queries. No amount of hardware upgrades and tuning of the parameters in the database server configuration file ‘my.cnf’ and the database server initialization file …

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Creating Custom Sysbench Scripts

Sysbench has long been established as the de facto standard when it comes to benchmarking MySQL performance. Percona relies on it daily, and even Oracle uses it when blogging about new features in MySQL 8. Sysbench comes with several pre-defined benchmarking tests. These tests are written in an easy-to-understand scripting language called Lua. Some of these tests are called: oltp_read_write, oltp_point_select, tpcc, oltp_insert. There are over ten such scripts to emulate various behaviors found in standard OLTP applications.

But what if your application does not fit the pattern of traditional OLTP? How can you continue to utilize the power of load-testing, benchmarking, …

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Percona Monitoring and Management (PMM) 1.16.0 Is Now Available

PMM (Percona Monitoring and Management) is a free and open-source platform for managing and monitoring MySQL, MongoDB, and PostgreSQL performance. You can run PMM in your own environment for maximum security and reliability. It provides thorough time-based analysis for MySQL® and MongoDB® servers to ensure that your data works as efficiently as possible.

While much of the team is working on longer-term projects, we were able to provide the following feature:

  • MySQL and PostgreSQL support for all cloud DBaaS providers – Use PMM Server to gather Metrics and Queries from remote instances!
  • Query Analytics + Metric Series – See Database activity alongside queries
  • Collect local metrics using node_exporter + textfile …
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Percona Monitoring and Management (PMM) 1.15.0 Is Now Available

Percona Monitoring and Management (PMM) is a free and open-source platform for managing and monitoring MySQL® and MongoDB® performance. You can run PMM in your own environment for maximum security and reliability. It provides thorough time-based analysis for MySQL® and MongoDB® servers to ensure that your data works as efficiently as possible.

This release offers two new features for both the MySQL Community and Percona Customers:

  • MySQL Custom Queries – Turn a SELECT into a dashboard!
  • Server and Client logs – Collect troubleshooting logs for Percona Support

We addressed 17 new features and improvements, and fixed 17 bugs.

MySQL Custom Queries

In 1.15 we are introducing the ability to …

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Percona Monitoring and Management (PMM) 1.14.1 Is Now Available

Percona Monitoring and Management (PMM) is a free and open-source platform for managing and monitoring MySQL® and MongoDB® performance. You can run PMM in your own environment for maximum security and reliability. It provides thorough time-based analysis for MySQL® and MongoDB® servers to ensure that your data works as efficiently as possible.

We’re releasing hotfix 1.14.1 to address two issues found post-release of 1.14.0:

  • PMM-2963: Upgrading to PMM 1.14.0 fails due to attempting to create already existing Dashboard
    • Our upgrade script incorrectly tried to create dashboards that already existed, and generating failure message:
      A folder or dashboard in the general folder with the same name …
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Percona Monitoring and Management (PMM) 1.14.0 Is Now Available

Percona Monitoring and Management (PMM) is a free and open-source platform for managing and monitoring MySQL® and MongoDB® performance. You can run PMM in your own environment for maximum security and reliability. It provides thorough time-based analysis for MySQL® and MongoDB® servers to ensure that your data works as efficiently as possible.



We’ve included a plethora of visual improvements in this release, including:

  • PostgreSQL Metrics Collection – Visualize PostgreSQL performance!
  • Identify New Queries in Query Analytics
  • New Dashboard: Compare System Parameters
  • New Dashboard: PERFORMANCE_SCHEMA Wait Events Analysis
  • Dashboard Updates – Advanced Data Exploration, MyRocks, TokuDB, InnoDB Metrics …
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Is It a Read Intensive or a Write Intensive Workload?

One of the common ways to classify database workloads is whether it is  “read intensive” or “write intensive”. In other words, whether the workload is dominated by reads or writes.

Why should you care? Because recognizing if the workload is read intensive or write intensive will impact your hardware choices, database configuration as well as what techniques you can apply for performance optimization and scalability.

This question looks trivial on the surface, but as you go deeper—complexity emerges. There are different “levels” of reads and writes for you to consider. You can also choose to look at event counts or at the time it takes to do operations. These can provide very different responses, especially as the cost difference between a single read and a single write can be an order of magnitude.

Let’s examine the TPC-C Benchmark from this point of view, or more specifically its …

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