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Displaying posts with tag: sysbench (reset)
Percona Live Europe Featured Talks: Modern sysbench – Teaching an Old Dog New Tricks with Alexey Kopytov

Welcome to another post in our series of interview blogs for the upcoming Percona Live Europe 2017 in Dublin. This series highlights a number of talks that will be at the conference and gives a short preview of what attendees can expect to learn from the presenter.

This blog post is with Alexey Kopytov, sofware developer and maintainer of sysbench. His talk is Modern sysbench: Teaching an Old Dog New Tricks. His presentation present new features provided by recent releases and explain how they can be used to create complex benchmark scenarios and collect performance metrics with a simple Lua API. It will also run a live demo of some of …

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sysbench Histograms: A Helpful Feature Often Overlooked

In this blog post, I will demonstrate how to run and use sysbench histograms.

One of the features of sysbench that I often I see overlooked (and rarely used) is its ability to produce detailed query response time histograms in addition to computing percentile numbers. Looking at histograms together with throughput or latency over time provides many additional insights into query performance.

Here is how you get detailed sysbench histograms and performance over time:

sysbench --rand-type=uniform --report-interval=1 --percentile=99 --time=300 --histogram --mysql-password=sbtest oltp_point_select --table_size=400000000 run

There are a few command line options to consider:

  • report-interval=1 – prints out the current performance measurements every second, which helps see if …
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Testing MyRocks vs InnoDB Performance Using sysbench 1.x oltp_point_select.lua

It seems MyRocks is going to become a hot topic in April 2017. Previously (here and there) I tried to compare its performance and scalability vs InnoDB from MySQL 5.7.17 using test case from famous bug #68079. It's an interesting case that took a lot of efforts from Oracle to make InnoDB scale properly, and InnoDB (on my QuadCore box at least, others reported different results on other hardware in comments) still outperformed MyRocks. But maybe it's corner case that is not a big deal in general?

Earlier this month I decided to give MyRocks another chance and try it with "industry-standard" benchmarks, like those provided by

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MySQL Support Engineer's Chronicles, Issue #5

A lot of time passed since my previous post in this series. I was busy with work, participating in FOSDEM, blogging about profilers and sharing various lists of MySQL bugs. But I do not plan to stop writing about my usual weeks of doing support engineer's job. So, time for the next post in this series, based on my random notes taken during the week here and there.

This week started for me with checking recent MySQL bug reports (actually I do it every day). …

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Performance Schema Benchmarks: OLTP RW

In this blog post, we’ll look at Performance Schema benchmarks for OLTP Read/Write workloads.

I am in love with Performance Schema and talk a lot about it. Performance Schema is a revolutionary MySQL troubleshooting instrument, but earlier versions had performance issues. Many of these issues are fixed now, and the default options work quickly and …

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Millions of Queries per Second: PostgreSQL and MySQL’s Peaceful Battle at Today’s Demanding Workloads

This blog compares how PostgreSQL and MySQL handle millions of queries per second.

Anastasia: Can open source databases cope with millions of queries per second? Many open source advocates would answer “yes.” However, assertions aren’t enough for well-grounded proof. That’s why in this blog post, we share the benchmark testing results from Alexander Korotkov (CEO of Development, Postgres Professional) and Sveta Smirnova (Principal Technical Services Engineer, Percona). The comparative research of PostgreSQL 9.6 and MySQL 5.7 performance will be especially valuable for environments with multiple databases.

The idea behind this research is to provide an honest comparison for the two popular RDBMSs. Sveta and Alexander wanted to test the most recent versions of both MySQL and PostgreSQL with the same tool, under the same challenging …

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MySQL in docker or native – performance benchmarks

Back in October I have write about possible ways of running multiple MySQL instances on the same hardware. As the months passing by, the project of splitting our database schemas into standalone instances is closing in, so I started to check the different ways. EDIT: This post is outdated, here is the follow up. I started […]

The MySQL query cache: Worst enemy or best friend?

During the last couple of months I have been involved in an unusually high amount of performance audits for e-commerce applications running with Magento. And although the systems were quite different, they also had one thing in common: the MySQL query cache was very useful. That was counter-intuitive for me as I’ve always expected the query cache to be such a bottleneck that response time is better when the query cache is turned off no matter what. That lead me to run a few experiments to better understand when the query cache can be helpful.

Some context

The query cache is well known for its contentions: a global mutex has to be acquired for any read or write operation, which means that any access is serialized. This was not an issue 15 years ago, but with today’s multi-core servers, such serialization is the best way to kill performance.

However from a performance …

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Q&A: High availability when using MySQL in the cloud

Last week I hosted a webinar on using MySQL in the cloud for High Availability (HA) alongside 451 Research analyst Jason Stamper. You can watch the recording and also download the slides (free) here. Just click the “Register” button at the end of that page.

We had several excellent questions and we didn’t have time to get to several of them in the allotted time. I’m posting them here along with the answers. Feel free to ask follow-up questions in the comments below.

Q: Can the TokuDB engine be used in a PXC environment?

A: No, TokuDB cannot currently be used in a PXC environment, the only supported engine in …

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Update on the InnoDB double-write buffer and EXT4 transactions

In a post, written a few months ago, I found that using EXT4 transactions with the “data=journal” mount option, improves the write performance significantly, by 55%, without putting data at risk. Many people commented on the post mentioning they were not able to reproduce the results and thus, I decided to further investigate in order to find out why my results were different.

So, I ran sysbench benchmarks on a few servers and found when the InnoDB double-write buffer limitations occur and when they don’t. I also made sure some of my colleagues were able to reproduce the results. Basically, in order to reproduce the results you need the following conditions:

  • Spinning disk (no SSD)
  • Enough CPU power
  • A dataset that fits in the InnoDB buffer pool
  • A continuous high write …
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