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Displaying posts with tag: sysbench (reset)
5.5M Key Lookups per second on 16 VCPU VMs

 As introduced in a previous blog RonDB enables us to easily execute benchmarks on RonDB using the Sysbench benchmark.


In this blog I will present some results where the RonDB cluster had 2 data nodes, each using a r5.4xlarge VM in AWS that has 16 VCPUs and 128 GB memory. The Sysbench test uses SQL to access RonDB.


In this particular test case we wanted to test the Key-Lookup performance using SQL. Key-Lookup performance is essential in the RonDB use case as an online Feature Store in Hopsworks.


In this case we use the …

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Research on Thread Pipelines using RonDB

 

Introduction

In my previous two blogs on this topic I first introduced the concept of automatic thread configuration and the thread model we use in RonDB. After receiving some questions on the topic I dived a bit deeper into explaining the RonDB thread model and its thread pipeline and compared it to another similar concept called batch pipelines.


Since then I read up a bit more on the research in this area with a focus on implementations in other key-value stores. Some researchers argue that a model where one handles the request immediately is superior to a model using a thread pipeline.

RonDB Software …

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Sysbench evaluation of RonDB

 

Introduction

Sysbench is a tool to benchmark to test open source databases. We have integrated Sysbench into the RonDB installation. This makes it extremely easy to run benchmarks with RonDB. This paper will describe the use of these benchmarks in RonDB. These benchmarks were executed with 1 cluster connection per MySQL Server. This limited the scalability per MySQL Server to about 12 VCPUs. Since we executed those benchmarks we have increased the number of cluster connections per MySQL Server to 4 providing scalability to at least 32 VCPUs per MySQL Server.


As preparation to run those benchmarks we have created a RonDB cluster using the Hopsworks framework that is currently used to create …

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Comparing RonDB 21.04.0 on AWS, Azure and GCP using Sysbench

 

Release of RonDB 21.04.0

RonDB is based on MySQL NDB Cluster optimised for use in modern cloud settings. Today we launch RonDB 21.04.0. In RonDB 21.04.0 we have integrated benchmark scripts to execute various benchmarks towards RonDB.


There are three ways of using RonDB. The first is using the managed version provided by Logical Clocks. This is currently available in AWS and is currently being developed to also support Azure. This is still in limited access mode. To access it contact Logical Clocks at the rondb.com website.


The second way is to use a script provided by Logical Clocks that automates the creation of VMs and the installation of the software components required by RonDB. These scripts are available to create RonDB clusters on Azure and GCP (Google Cloud). This script can be downloaded from nexus.hops.works/rondb-cloud-installer.sh.


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MySQL + Dynimize: 3.6 Million Queries per Second on a Single VM

In this post I describe the various steps that allowed me to reach 3.6 million queries per second on a single VM instance using MySQL 8.0 with the help of Dynimize.


It's not every day that you get to break a record. So when I discovered that you can now rent by the hour massive instances within Google Compute Cloud that support 224 virtual cores based on AMD EPYC 2 Rome processors, I had to jump at the opportunity to see what kind low hanging fruit might be out there. Low and behold I found it! Oracle's performance record for MySQL on a single server stands at 2.1M QPS without using Unix sockets, and 2.25M QPS with Unix sockets. Seeing that they published this 3 years ago on Broadwell based …

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MySQL Performance : Understanding InnoDB IO Internals & "Checkpointing"

Few weeks ago with a big curiosity I was reading several articles published by Percona about TPCC Benchmark results and MySQL 8.0 "checkpointing" issues..

Unfortunately, in these articles there was no any explanation nor any tentative to understand what is going on, an probably at least try and validate some "first coming in mind" tuning / troubleshooting options.. (And even no any try to show in action so often advertised PMM, and see on what it'll point ?)..

All in all, in the following article I'll try to feel up the "white holes" left in this TPCC testing..

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MySQL Performance : TPCC "Mystery" [SOLVED]

The TPCC workload "mystery" exposed in the following post was already clarified the last year, and I've presented explanations about the observed problem during PerconaLIVE-2019. But slides are slides, while article is article ;-)) So, I decided to take a time to write a few lines more about, to keep this post as a reference for further TPCC investigations..

The "mystery" is related to observed scalability issues on MySQL 8.0 under the given TPCC workload -- just that on the old aged DBT-2 workload (TPCC variation) I was getting much higher TPS when running on 2 CPU Sockets, comparing to1 CPU Socket, which is was not at all the case for Sysbench-TPCC.

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MySQL Performance : The New InnoDB Double Write Buffer in Action

The new MySQL-8.0.20 release is coming with re-designed InnoDB Double Write Buffer (DBLWR), and, indeed, it's one huge historical PITA less.. -- why it was so painful and cost us much blood in the past, I could not better explain than already done it in the following article yet from 2018 about MySQL on IO-bound workloads.. The story is not complete, as it's missing the 2019's chapter (will tell it later, np) -- but if you'll (re)read the mentioned above article first, you'll better understand the next ;-))

But at least the current post is only about good news now -- the new DBLWR and how it helps to solve historical MySQL performance problems ! -- and as one picture is better than million words, I'll try to save 3M words here (as there are 3 pictures in this article ;-))

Well, I'll also skip all new design details …

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Sysbench and the Random Distribution Effect

What You May Not Know About Random Number Generation in Sysbench

Sysbench is a well known and largely used tool to perform benchmarking. Originally written by Peter Zaitsev in early 2000, it has become a de facto standard when performing testing and benchmarking. Nowadays it is maintained by Alexey Kopytov and can be found in Github at https://github.com/akopytov/sysbench.

What I have noticed though, is that while widely-used, some aspects of sysbench are not really familiar to many. For instance, the easy way to expand/modify the MySQL tests is using the lua extension, or the embedded way it handles the random number generation. 

Why This Article? 

I wrote this article with the intent to show how easy it can be to customize sysbench to make it what you need. There are many different ways to extend sysbench use, and one of these is …

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How to Measure MySQL Performance in Kubernetes with Sysbench

As our Percona Kubernetes Operator for Percona XtraDB Cluster gains in popularity, I am getting questions about its performance and how to measure it properly. Sysbench is the most popular tool for database performance evaluation, so let’s review how we can use it with Percona XtraDB Cluster Operator.

Operator Setup

I will assume that you have an operator running (if not, this is the topic for a different post). We have the documentation on how to get it going, and we will start a three-node cluster using the following cr.yaml file:

apiVersion: pxc.percona.com/v1-3-0
kind: PerconaXtraDBCluster
metadata:
  name: cluster1
  finalizers:
    - delete-pxc-pods-in-order
spec:
  secretsName: my-cluster-secrets
  sslSecretName: …
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