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Displaying posts with tag: howto (reset)
How to validate server configuration settings.

After upgrading the server many users start it with an unchanged config file only to find some deprecated options that they were using are no longer supported by the later server version, which causes the upgraded server to shutdown. In other cases modifying the server configuration file results in the server refusing to start when an invalid name is mistakenly entered in the configuration file.…

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On Importing InnoDB Tablespaces and Row Formats

Let me start with a short summary and then proceed with a long story, code snippets, hexdumps, links and awk functions converted from the source code of MariaDB server. This blog post can be summarized as follows:

  • One can find row_format used to create table explicitly in the .frm file (or the outputs of SHOW CREATE TABLE or SHOW TABLE STATUS). Internals manual may help to find out where is it stored and source code reading helps to find the way to interpret the values.
  • For InnoDB tables created without specifying the row_format explicitly neither logical backup nor .frm file itself contains the information about the row format used. There are 4 of them (Redundant, Compact, Dynamic and Compressed). The one used implicitly is defined by current value of the …
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MySQL InnoDB Cluster – HowTo #2 – Validate an instance

Q: Validate an instance for MySQL InnoDB Cluster usage?

A: Use check_instance_configuration()

MySQL Tutorial – Managing MySQL Server Logs: Rotate, Compress, Retain & Delete

MySQL Server generates several logs that can help you monitor the activities of the server. However, once these logs are enabled, they can grow in size and start taking up too much disk space. This is why it’s important to have an automated way of archiving and preserving MySQL log files for a certain duration, as well as deleting the old ones. In this blog post, we describe some best practices for setting up and managing MySQL error logs, general logs and slow query logs for your MySQL deployments.

Setting Up MySQL Server Logging

Let’s look at how to setup the following 3 types of logs:

Error Log

Logs all the problems encountered during starting, running, or stopping mysqld. This log can be enabled by having the following option in /etc/my.cnf file:

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MySQL High Availability Framework Explained – Part III: Failure Scenarios

In this three-part blog series, we introduced a High Availability (HA) Framework for MySQL hosting in Part I, and discussed the details of MySQL semisynchronous replication in Part II. Now in Part III, we review how the framework handles some of the important MySQL failure scenarios and recovers to ensure high availability.

MySQL Failure Scenarios Scenario 1 – Master MySQL Goes Down

  • The Corosync and Pacemaker framework detects that the master MySQL is no longer available. Pacemaker demotes the master resource and tries …
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MySQL InnoDB Cluster – HowTo #1 – Monitor your cluster

MySQL InnoDB Cluster - HowTo #1 - Monitor your cluster

Q: How do I monitor the status & the configuration of my cluster?

A: Use status() or status({extended:true}) or status({queryMembers:true})?

MySQL Tutorial – Understanding The Seconds Behind Master Value

In a MySQL hosting replication setup, the parameter Seconds_Behind_Master (SBM), as displayed by the SHOW SLAVE STATUS command, is commonly used as an indication of the current replication lag of the slave. In this blog post, we examine how to understand and interpret this value in various situations.

Possible Values of  Seconds Behind Master

The value of SBM, as explained in the  MySQL documentation, depends on the state of the MySQL slave in general, and the states of MySQL slave SQL_THREAD and IO_THREAD in particular. While IO_THREAD connects with the master and reads the updates, SQL_THREAD applies these updates on the slave. Let’s examine the possible values of SBM during different states of the MySQL Slave.

When SBM Value is Null

  • SBM is …
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Using dbdeployer With MariaDB Server

Some time ago I've noted that one of the tools I use for testing various MySQL and MariaDB cases and to reproduce potential bugs, MySQL-Sandbox, is not updated any more. It turned out that active development switched to its port in Go called dbdeployer. You can find detailed information about dbdeployer and reasons behind developing it provided by its author, Giuseppe Maxia, here and there. See also this post at Percona blog for some quick review of its main features. One of the points of …

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MySQL High Availability Framework Explained – Part II: Semisynchronous Replication

In Part I, we introduced a High Availability (HA) framework for MySQL hosting and discussed various components and their functionality. Now in Part II, we will discuss the details of MySQL semisynchronous replication and the related configuration settings that help us ensure redundancy and consistency of the data in our HA setup. Make sure to check back in for Part III where we will review various failure scenarios that could arise and the way the framework responds and recovers from these conditions.

What is MySQL Semisynchronous Replication?

Simply put, in a …

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How to Get Details About MyRocks Deadlocks in MariaDB and Percona Server

In my previous post on ERROR 1213 I noted that Percona Server does not support the SHOW ENGINE ROCKSDB TRANSACTION STATUS statement to get deadlock details in "text" form. I've got some clarifications in my related feature request, PS-5114. So I decided to write this followup post and show what is the way to get deadlock details for the ROCKSDB tables in current versions of MariaDB and Percona Server.

First of all, I'd like to check MariaDB's implementation of MyRocks. For this I'll re-create deadlock scenario from that my post with MariaDB 10.3.12 I have at hand. We should start with installing ROCKSDB

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