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Displaying posts with tag: dbdeployer (reset)
dbdeployer cookbook - Advanced techniques

In the previous post about the dbdeployer recipes we saw the basics of using the cookbook command and the simpler tutorials that the recipes offer.

Here we will see some more advanced techniques, and more demanding examples.


We saw that the recipe for a single deployment would get a NOTFOUND when no versions were available, or the highest MySQL version when one was found.

$ dbdeployer cookbook  show single | grep version=
version=$1
[ -z "$version" ] && version=8.0.16

But what if we want the latest Percona Server or MariaDB for this recipe? One solution …

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dbdeployer cookbook - usability by example

When I designed dbdeployer, I wanted to eliminate most of the issues that the old MySQL-Sandbox had:

  • dependencies during installation
  • mistaken tarballs
  • clarity of syntax
  • features (un)awareness.



Dependencies during installation did go away right from the start, as the dbdeployer executable is ready to be used without additional components. The only dependency is to have a host that can run MySQL. There is little dbdeployer can do about detecting whether or not your system can run MySQL. It depends on which version and flavor of MySQL you are running. It should not be a big deal as I assume that anyone in need of dbdeployer has already the necessary knowledge about MySQL …

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Testing MySQL NDB Cluster with dbdeployer

Tweet

A great way to install MySQL when you need to do quick tests is to use a sandbox tool. This allows you to perform all the installation steps with a single command making the whole process very simple, and it allows for automation of the test. Giuseppe Maxia (also known as the Data Charmer, @datacharmer on Twitter) has for many years maintained sandbox tools for MySQL, first with MySQL Sandbox and now with dbdeployer.

One of the most recent features of dbdeployer is the support for MySQL NDB Cluster. In this blog, I will take …

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dbdeployer community: Part 3 - MySQL Cluster (NDB)

I remember wanting to create MySQL Cluster sandboxes several years ago. By then, however, MySQL-Sandbox technology was not flexible enough to allow an easy inclusion, and the cluster software itself was not as easy to install as it is today. Thus, I kept postponing the implementation, until I started working with dbdeployer.

I included the skeleton of support for MySQL Cluster since the beginning (by keeping a range of ports dedicated for this technology, but I didn’t do anything until June 2018, when I made public my intentions to add support for NDB in dbdeployer with issue #20 (Add support for MySQL Cluster)). The issue had just a bare idea, but I needed help from someone, as my expertise with …

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dbdeployer community - Part 2: Percona XtraDB Cluster

This was not on the radar. I have never been proficient in Galera clusters and related technologies, and thus I hadn’t given much thought to Percona Xtradb Cluster (PXC), until Alkin approached me at FOSDEM, and proposed to extend dbdeployer features to support PXC. He mentioned that many support engineers at Percona use dbdeployer) on a daily basis and that the addition of PXC would be welcome.

I could not follow up much during the conference, but we agreed on making a proof-of-concept in an indirect way: if several nodes of PXC can run in the same host …

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dbdeployer community - Part 1: TiDB

After a conference, when I take stock of what I have learned, I usually realise that the best achievements are the result of interacting with other attendees during the breaks, rather than simply listening to the lectures. It might be because I follow closely the blogosphere and thus the lectures have few surprises in store for me, or perhaps because many geeks take the conference as an excuse to refresh dormant friendships, catch up with technical gossip, and ask their friends some questions that were too sensitive to be discussed over Twitter and have been waiting for a chance of an in-person meeting to see the light of the day.

I surely had some of such questions, and I took advantage of the conference to ask them. As it often happens, I got satisfactory …

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On my Favorite FOSDEM 2019 MySQL, MariaDB and Friends Devroom Talks

This year I had not only spoken about MySQL bugs reporting at FOSDEM, but spent almost the entire day listening at MySQL, MariaDB and Friends Devroom. I missed only one talk, on ProxySQL, (to get some water, drink a bottle of famous Belgian beer and chat with my former colleague in MySQL support team, Geert, whom I had not seen for a decade). So, for the first time out of my 4 FOSDEM visits I've got a first hand impression about the entire set of talks in the devroom that I want to share today, while I still remember my feelings.

Most of the talks have both slides and videos …

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Reminder: Madrid MySQL User Group Meetup presenting dbdeployer on Thursday in Madrid

This is a quick reminder that on Thursday (tomorrow) there there is a Madrid MySQL Users Group Meeting where Giuseppe Maxia will be presenting dbdeployer to us. More information can be found here. Do not forget to sign up if you are interested. We look forward to seeing you there.

Using dbdeployer With MariaDB Server

Some time ago I've noted that one of the tools I use for testing various MySQL and MariaDB cases and to reproduce potential bugs, MySQL-Sandbox, is not updated any more. It turned out that active development switched to its port in Go called dbdeployer. You can find detailed information about dbdeployer and reasons behind developing it provided by its author, Giuseppe Maxia, here and there. See also this post at Percona blog for some quick review of its main features. One of the points of …

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MySQL adjustment bureau


When maintainng any piece of software, we usually deal with two kind of actions:

  • bug fixing,
  • new features.

bugs and features

A bug happens when there is an error in the software, which does not behave according to the documentation or the specifications. In short, it's a breech of contract between the software maintainer and the users. The promise, i.e. the software API that was published at every major version, is broken, and the software must be reconciled with the expectations and fixed, so that it behaves again as the documentation says. When we fix a bug in this way, we increment the revision number of the software version (e.g. 1.0.0 to 1.0.1. See semantic …

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