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Displaying posts with tag: War Story (reset)
Getting past 2400 threads with sysbench and dbdeployer for benchmarking MySQL 5.7.26

I am currently running tests with sysbench and dbdeployer on a Google Cloud Platform Debian 9 instance.  I ran into an interesting limit and lifting it was not straightforward.  I hope that by sharing this, you can avoid losing too much time.

The benchmark I am using is the insert benchmark.  I am able to run it with 2048 threads but I am not able to run it with 4096 threads (and yes, it makes

Care with using the max_connections beta database flag on CloudSQL...

War story of the day: do not use — or be very careful when using — the max_connections beta database flag on CloudSQL... because it has many bugs.

I was hit by this today: we set the max_connections flag to 8000 on a primary server a few days ago, we had a failover last night, and the flag was not set on the replica (bug #1).

Update 2019-05-03: there is another bug (bug #1.5).  If you set the

Care when changing MASTER_DELAY with CHANGE MASTER TO (delayed replication)

A few days ago, I stepped into a trap !  This made me lose time for fixing things (and even more for writing this post...).  In the hope that you will avoid my mistake, I am sharing this war story.  I also obviously opened a bug, more about this below.

TL&DR: be careful when using CHANGE MASTER TO MASTER_DELAY = N: it might wipe your relay logs !

As written in the TL&DR, running CHANGE MASTER 

The danger of no Primary Key when replicating in RBR (and a partial protection with MariaDB 10.1)

TL;DR: unless you know what you are doing, you should always have a primary key on your tables when replicating in RBR (and maybe even all the time).

TL;DR2: MariaDB 10.1 has an interesting way to protect against missing a primary key (innodb_force_primary_key) but it could be improved.

A few weeks ago, I was called off hours because replication delay on all the slaves from a replication chain

Fun with InnoDB Persistent Statistics

Something interesting happened to me in the last days, and it is worth sharing.  I was upgrading MariaDB (MySQL also impacted) to a new major version and mysql_upgrade showed something like this:

[...] Phase 4/7: Running 'mysql_fix_privilege_tables' ERROR 1062 (23000) at line 586: Duplicate entry 'schema-table_name#P#partition_name_truncated' for key 'PRIMARY' ERROR 1062 (23000) at line 590:

How upgrading MariaDB Server failed because 50M warnings were ignored

This post is part of the series "please do not ignore warnings in MySQL/MariaDB".  The previous post of the series can be found here.

In this post, I will present why ignoring warnings made me lose time in upgrading MariaDB Server.  I think this war story is entertaining to read and it is also worth presenting to people claiming that ignoring warnings is no big deal.

A few months ago, I was in

Do not run those commands with MariaDB GTIDs - part # 2

Update 2016-01-30: restarting the IO_THREAD might be considered useful in some situations (avoiding MDEV-9138).  Look for "in contrast, if the IO thread was also stopped first" in MDEV-6589 for more information.

In a previous post, I listed some sequences of commands that you should not run on a MariaDB slave that is lagging and which is using the GTID protocol.  Those are the following (do not

Do not run those commands with MariaDB GTIDs - part # 1

In the spirit of sharing war stories and avoiding others to do the same mistakes as I did, here are some sequences of commands that you should avoid to run on a MariaDB slave that is lagging and which is using the GTID protocol.  Remember, do not run those because...

So, those bad commands are the following:

"STOP SLAVE; START SLAVE UNTIL ...;", or "STOP SLAVE; START SLAVE;" (to remove an

Showing entries 1 to 8