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Displaying posts with tag: Percona Monitoring and Management (reset)
PMM, Federated Tables, Table Stats, and Lots of Connections!

Earlier in the year, I was working on an issue where one of my clients had reported a massive influx in connection on their hosts after enabling Percona Monitoring and Management (PMM). This was something I had not seen before and after researching for a couple of days I discovered that if you monitor a MySQL instance with PMM configured to collect table statistics, and if the tables that it’s gathering statistics from are Federated, it will generate a connection on the remote host for the Federated tables, one for each Federated table in the instance. Let’s go over the details and provide some examples so we can understand this a bit better.

First, I’ll offer a reminder that a Federated table is simply a table that you can put in your MySQL instance that is empty locally and uses a network connection to get the data from …

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Enabling ProcFS UDF in Percona Monitoring and Management

In my previous blog post, ProcFS UDF: A Different Approach to Agentless Operating System Observability in Your Database, I wrote about the ProcFS UDF MySQL plugin, which allows you to get operating systems stats, through the MySQL database, without having shell access to the server and any local agent installation.

Some of you wondered whether there is a way to use this goodness in Percona Monitoring and Management (PMM), and this blog post will show you exactly how to do that.

Unfortunately, at this point, Percona Monitoring and Management does not support the ProcFS UDF MySQL plugin out of the box. It is in the backlog, along with many other cool things. However, …

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How Percona Monitoring and Management Helps You Find Out Why Your MySQL Server Is Stalling

In this blog, I will demonstrate how to use Percona Monitoring and Management (PMM) to find out the reason why the MySQL server is stalling. I will use only one typical situation for the MySQL server stall in this example, but the same dashboards, graphs, and principles will help you in all other cases.

Nobody wants it but database servers may stop handling connections at some point. As a result, the application will slow down and then will stop responding.

It is always better to know about the stall from a monitoring instrument rather than from your own customers.

PMM is a great help in this case. If you look at its graphs and notice that many of them started showing unusual behavior, you need to react. In the case of stalls, you will see that either some activity went to 0 or, otherwise, it increased to high …

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Percona Monitoring and Management – MySQL Semi-Sync Summary Dashboard

Some of you may use MySQL’s asynchronous replication feature called Semisynchronous Replication (aka semi-sync), and now with the MySQL Semi-Sync Summary Dashboard + Percona Monitoring and Management (PMM), you can see the most important metrics! Refer to the Install & Usage steps for deployment details (note you need Replication Set defined!).

What is Semisynchronous Replication

When enabled, Semisynchronous Replication instructs the Primary to wait until at least one replica has received and logged the event to the replica’s local relay log before completing the COMMIT on a transaction. This provides a higher level of data integrity because now it is known that the data exists in two places. This feature ensures a …

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Webinar April 14: Optimize and Troubleshoot MySQL Using Percona Monitoring and Management

Optimizing MySQL performance and troubleshooting MySQL problems are two of the most critical and challenging tasks for MySQL DBAs. The databases powering applications need to be able to handle changing traffic workloads while remaining responsive and stable in order to deliver an excellent user experience. Further, DBAs are also expected to find cost-efficient means of solving these issues.

In this webinar, we will demonstrate the advanced options of Percona Monitoring and Management V.2 that enable you to solve these challenges, which are built on free and open-source software. We will look at specific, common MySQL problems and review them.

Please join Peter Zaitsev on Wednesday, April 14th, 2021, at 11 am EDT for his webinar Optimize and Troubleshoot MySQL using Percona Monitoring and Management (PMM).

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Q&A on Webinar “Using PMM to Identify and Troubleshoot Problematic MySQL Queries”

Hi and thanks to all who attended my webinar on Tuesday, January 26th titled Using PMM to Identify & Troubleshoot Problematic MySQL Queries!

Like we do after all our webinars, we compile the list of questions that were answered verbally and also those that were posed yet remained unanswered since we ran out of time during the broadcast.  Before we get to the questions, I wanted to make sure to include a link to the RED Method for MySQL Queries by Peter Zaitsev, Percona’s CEO:

https://grafana.com/grafana/dashboards/12470

Hi Michael, you suggested that table create and update times should be ignored. Surely these values come from information_schema.tables? Does that not reflect what I would see …

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Understanding MySQL Memory Usage with Performance Schema

Understanding how MySQL uses memory is key to tuning it for optimal performance as well as troubleshooting cases of unexpected memory usage, i.e. when you have MySQL Server using a lot more than you would expect based on your configuration settings.

Early in MySQL history, understanding memory usage details was hard and included a lot of guesswork.  Is it possible that some queries running require a large temporary table or allocated a lot of memory for stored user variables?  Are any stored procedures taking an unexpectedly high amount of memory? All could be reasons for excessive MySQL memory usage, but you would not easily see if that is just the case.

All that changed with MySQL 5.7, which added memory instrumentation in Performance Schema, and with MySQL 8.0, this instrumentation is enabled by default, so you can get this data from pretty much any running instance.

If you’re looking for current memory …

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How to Find Query Slowdowns Using Percona Monitoring and Management

Visibility is a blessing, and with databases, visibility is a must. That’s true not only for metrics but for the queries themselves. Having info on all the stats around query execution is priceless, and Percona Monitoring and Management (PMM) offers that in the form of the Query Analytics dashboard (QAN).

But where to start? QAN helps you with that by calculating the query profile. What is the profile? It’s a rank of queries, ordered by Load, so it is easy to spot the heaviest queries hitting your database. The Load is defined as the “Average Active Queries” but can also be defined as a mix of Query Execution Time Plus Query count. In other words, all the time the query was alive and kicking.

The Profile in PMM 2.10.0 looks like this:

The purpose of this profile is to facilitate the task of finding the …

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How Much Memory Does the Process Really Take on Linux?

One of the questions you often will be faced with operating a Linux-based system is managing memory budget. If a program uses more memory than available you may get swapping to happen, oftentimes with a terrible performance impact, or have Out of Memory (OOM) Killer activated, killing process altogether.

Before adjusting memory usage, either by configuration, optimization, or just managing the load, it helps to know how much memory a given program really uses.

If your system runs essentially a single user program (there is always a bunch of system processes) it is easy.  For example, if I run a dedicated MySQL server on a system with 128GB of RAM I can use “used” as a good proxy of what is used and “available” as what can still be used.

root@rocky:/mnt/data2/mysql# free -h …
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MySQL Query Performance Troubleshooting: Resource-Based Approach

When I speak about MySQL performance troubleshooting (or frankly any other database), I tend to speak about four primary resources which typically end up being a bottleneck and limiting system performance: CPU, Memory, Disk, and Network.

It would be great if when seeing what resource is a bottleneck, we could also easily see what queries contribute the most to its usage and optimize or eliminate them. Unfortunately, it is not as easy as it may seem.

First, MySQL does not really provide very good instrumentation in those terms, and it is not easy to get information on how much CPU usage, Disk IO, or Memory a given query caused.  Second, direct attribution is not even possible in a lot of cases. For example, disk writes from flushing data from the InnoDB buffer pool in the …

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