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Displaying posts with tag: Database design (reset)
MySQL sakila Database

While I thought my instructions were clear, it appears there should have been more in my examples for using the MySQL MSI. A key thing that happened is that students opted not to install:

Samples and Examples 8.0.22

Unfortunately, they may not have read the Preface of Alan Beaulieu’s Learning SQL, 3rd Edition where he explains how to manually download the files from the MySQL web site. Here are those, very clear, instructions (pg. XV) with my additions in italics for the MySQL Shell:

First, you will need to launch the mysql command-line client or the mysqlsh command-line shell, and provide a password, and then perform the following steps:

  1. Go to https://dev.mysql.com/doc/index-other.html and download the files for the …
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MySQL Self-Join

I’m switching to MySQL and leveraging Alan Beaulieu’s Learning SQL as a supporting reference for my Database Design and Development course. While reviewing Alan’s Chapter 5: Querying Multiple Tables, I found his coverage of using self-joins minimal.

In fact, he adds a prequel_film_id column to the film table in the sakila database and then a single row to demonstrate a minimal self-join query. I wanted to show them how to view a series of rows interconnected by a self-join, like the following:

SELECT   f.title AS film
,        fp.title AS prequel
FROM     film f LEFT JOIN film fp
ON       f.prequel_id = fp.film_id
WHERE    f.series_name = 'Harry Potter'
AND      fp.series_name = 'Harry Potter'
ORDER BY f.series_number;

It returns the following result set:

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MySQL Update in mysqli

Somebody didn’t like the MySQLi Update Query example on the tutorialspoint.com website because it use the procedure mysqli_query style. Here’s a simple example of using the object-oriented method version. More or less, instead of query it uses the more intuitive execute() method.

The update_member function contains the logic and below it is a call to the test the function. It relies on a MySQLCredentials.inc file that contains the hostname, user name, password, and database name. You can create create member table, like my example in MySQL 8, or any other table in your MySQL database.

<?php /*
||  Function Name: update_member
*/
function update_member($account_number, $member_type, …
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Cassandra on Fedora 27

The last time that I installed Cassandra was on a version of Fedora 20. So, I new the first thing to check was the installation of Java. You can check the Java installation with two statements on a fresh installation of Fedora 27. You need to check the Java runtime and then the Java Software Development Kit before installing, starting, and using Cassandra.

Installing Prerequisites

You check the Java runtime with this command:

java -version

It should return:

openjdk version "1.8.0_171"
OpenJDK Runtime Environment (build 1.8.0_171-b10)
OpenJDK 64-Bit Server VM (build 25.171-b10, mixed mode)

You check the Java Software Development Kit (JSDK) with this command:

javac -version

It should return:

javac 1.8.0_171

After verifying the Java and JSDK installation, you can install the Cassandra packages with the following yum command as the …

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Using MySQL Workbench

I’ve been setting up a simplified lab environment to let my students learn use in class. This added content will show them how to do reverse engineering with MySQL Workbench.

It’s a complete Fedora image with MySQL and Oracle Database 11g for the course. The uncompressed image is 14GB and the compressed image is 5.3GB. I chose Fedora because it’s the smallest open source image that supports both environments, and Fedora is the closest to Red Hat and Oracle Unbreakable Linux. I’m inclined to make the instance available generally but haven’t figured out the best way to do that.

Here are the new instructions I’m adding and if you have any input leave it as a comment.

You connect as the student user, which puts you in the /home/student directory. Once connected to the Fedora OS, you open a Terminal session by clicking on Activities in the upper right hand corner, and then you …

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Capture MySQL Foreign Keys

Shantanu asked a follow-up question on my Cleanup a MySQL Schema post from last month. He wanted to know if there was a way to capture foreign keys before removing them. The answer is yes, but how you do it depends on whether the primary key is based on a surrogate key using an auto incrementing sequence of a natural key using descriptive columns.

You can capture foreign keys with a simple query when they’re determined by a single column value. However, this script creates ALTER statements that will fail when a table holds a multiple column foreign key value. The SELECT statement would look like this when capturing all foreign key values in a MySQL Server:

SELECT   CONCAT('ALTER TABLE',' ',tc.table_schema,'.',tc.table_name,' '
               ,'ADD CONSTRAINT',' …
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Add User Defined Types

Somebody asked me if there was a cheaper alternative to using the Embarcadero Data Architect (a data modeling tool). I said sure, you can use the MySQL Workbench. My friend laughed and said, it’s to model Oracle databases and they use different data types. I broke the news to him that he can create his own user defined types and use MySQL Workbench to model problems for the Oracle Database 11g.

For example, you can launch the MySQL Workbench, and click on the Model menu option, and in the menu window click on the User Defined Types choice, as shown in the following:

Choosing the User Defined Type option, launches the following form. You can enter customized user defined types in the User Defined Types module:

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Relationship Notations

One of my students asked how to convert MySQL Workbench’s default Crow’s Foot (IE) diagram to one of the other supported formats – Classic, Connect to Columns, UML, and IDEF1X. Crow’s Foot is also known as the Information Engineering Model method (covered in Chapter 3 of my MySQL Workbench: Data Modeling & Development.

It quite simple, you open the Model Overview window, click on the Model menu choice. In the dialog, click on the Relationship Notation menu option. Click on one of the choices in the nested menu, like Column to Columns.

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MySQL Image Architecture

The LinkedIn MySQL DB Development group posed a questions on how to handle images. Naturally, the argument always goes: Should images be deployed in the database or the file system? I believe they should be stored in the database because the cost and time associated is too high with regard to managing files, a file naming schema, and backing up the file system discretely from the database.

Since there’s a significant difference between the backup of transactional data and image data, they should be placed in different databases. The imagedb database is where you would place the images and large text descriptions, as shown in the MySQL Workbench ERD:

The imagedb ERD splits the foreign key references back to the system_user table, which contains the individual user credentials. The …

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Why Stored Programs?

Why should you use stored programs? Great question, here’s my little insight into a situation that I heard about in a large organization.

A very large organization is having a technology argument. In someway, like politics, half-truth drives this type of discussion. This company has hundreds of databases and they’re about half SQL Server and Oracle. The argument (half-truth) states that using T-SQL or PL/SQL yields “spaghetti” code!

It seems like an old argument from my perspective. After all, I’ve been working with T-SQL and PL/SQL for a long time. Spaghetti code exists in every language when unskilled programmers solve problems but the point here is one of software architecture, and an attempt to malign stored programming in general. Let’s examine the merit of the argument against stored programs.

First of all, the argument against stored programs is simply not true. SQL DML statements, like the …

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