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Displaying posts with tag: storage (reset)
Fsync Performance on Storage Devices

While preparing a post on the design of ZFS based servers for use with MySQL, I stumbled on the topic of fsync call performance. The fsync call is very expensive, but it is essential to databases as it allows for durability (the “D” of the ACID acronym).

Let’s first review the type of disk IO operations executed by InnoDB in MySQL. I’ll assume the default InnoDB variable values.

The first and most obvious type of IO are pages reads and writes from the tablespaces. The pages are most often read one at a time, as 16KB random read operations. Writes to the tablespaces are also typically 16KB random operations, but they are done in batches. After every batch, fsync is called on the tablespace file handle.

To avoid partially written pages in the tablespaces (a source of data corruption), InnoDB performs a doublewrite. During a doublewrite operation, a batch of dirty pages, from 1 to about 100 pages, is …

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Using ioping to Evaluate Storage Performance for MySQL Workloads

In this blog post, we’ll look at how ioping can be used with other tools to understand and troubleshoot storage performance, specifically as it relates to MySQL workloads.

I recently ran into ioping, a nice little utility by Konstantin Khlebnikov that checks storage latency.  

For me, the main beauty of ioping is its simplicity and familiarity. It takes after the ubiquitous ping tool, but “pings” the storage instead of the network device.

First, let’s talk about what this tool isn’t: it isn’t a benchmark tool to stress load your storage as heavily as possible. For that, you can use iozone or sysbench (among many others). This also isn’t a tool for looking at …

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Looking at Disk Utilization and Saturation

In this blog post, I will look at disk utilization and saturation.

In my previous blog post, I wrote about CPU utilization and saturation, the practical difference between them and how different CPU utilization and saturation impact response times. Now we will look at another critical component of database performance: the storage subsystem. In this post, I will refer to the storage subsystem as “disk” (as a casual catch-all). 

The most common tool for command line IO performance monitoring is

iostat

, which shows information like this:

root@ts140i:~# iostat -x nvme0n1 5
Linux 4.4.0-89-generic (ts140i)         08/05/2017      _x86_64_        (4 CPU)
avg-cpu:  %user   %nice %system %iowait  %steal   %idle
          0.51    0.00    2.00    9.45    0.00   88.04
Device:         rrqm/s …
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Q & A: MySQL In the Cloud – Migration, Best Practices, High Availability, Scaling

In this blog, we will provide answers to the Q & A for the MySQL In the Cloud: Migration, Best Practices, High Availability, Scaling webinar.

First, we want to thank everybody for attending the June 7, 2017 webinar. The recording and slides for the webinar are available here. Below is the list of your questions that we were unable to answer during the webinar:

How does Percona XtraDB cluster work with AWS for MySQL clustering?

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The Puzzling Performance of the Samsung 960 Pro

In this blog post, I’ll take a look at the performance of the Samsung 960 Pro SSD NVME.

First, I know the Samsung 960 Pro is a consumer SSD NVME drive, not intended for sustained data center workloads. But the AnandTech review looked good enough that I decided to take it for a test spin to see if it would work well with MySQL benchmarks.

Before that, I decided to do a simple sysbench file IO test to see how the drives handled sustained workloads, and if it would start acting up.

My expectation for a consumer SSD drive is that its write consistency will suffer. Many of those drives can sustain high bursts for short periods of time but have to slow down to keep up with write leveling (and other …

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Using NVMe Command Line Tools to Check NVMe Flash Health

In this blog post, I’ll look at the types of NVMe flash health information you can get from using the NVMe command line tools.

Checking SATA-based drive health is easy. Whether it’s an SSD or older spinning drive, you can use the

smartctl

 command to get a wealth of information about the device’s performance and health. As an example:

root@blinky:/var/lib/mysql# smartctl -A /dev/sda
smartctl 6.5 2016-01-24 r4214 [x86_64-linux-4.4.0-62-generic] (local build)
Copyright (C) 2002-16, Bruce Allen, Christian Franke, www.smartmontools.org
=== START OF READ SMART DATA SECTION ===
SMART Attributes Data Structure revision number: 16
Vendor Specific SMART Attributes with Thresholds:
ID# ATTRIBUTE_NAME          FLAG     VALUE WORST THRESH TYPE      UPDATED  WHEN_FAILED RAW_VALUE
 1 Raw_Read_Error_Rate     0x002f   100   100   000 …
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How to Move a MySQL Partition from One Table to Another

In this blog post we’ll look at how to move a MySQL partition from one table to another, for MySQL versions before 5.7.

Up to version 5.7, MySQL had a limitation that made it impossible to directly exchange partitions between partitioned tables. Now and then, we get questions about how to import an .ibd for use as a partition in a table, as well as how to exchange partitions with another partitioned table. Below is step-by-step instructions on how to move a partition from one table to another.

In this example, one of our customers had two tables with the following structures:

CREATE TABLE live_tbl (
some_id bigint(20) NOT NULL DEFAULT '0',
summary_date date NOT NULL,
PRIMARY KEY (some_id,summary_date)
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8 COLLATE=utf8_unicode_ci
/*!50500 PARTITION BY RANGE …
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Don’t Spin Your Data, Use SSDs!

This blog post discussed the advantages of SSDs over HDDs for database environments.

For years now, I’ve been telling audiences for my MySQL Performance talk the following: if you are running an I/O-intensive database on spinning disks you’re doing it wrong. But there are still a surprising number of laggards who aren’t embracing SSD storage (whether it’s for cost or reliability reasons).

Let’s look at cost first. As I write this now (September 2016), high-performance server-grade spinning hard drives run for about $240 for 600GB (or $0.40 per GB).  Of course, you can get an 8TB archive drive at about same price …

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Testing Samsung storage in tpcc-mysql benchmark of Percona Server

This blog post will detail the results of Samsung storage in

tpcc-mysql

 benchmark using Percona Server.

I had an opportunity to test different Samsung storage devices under tpcc-mysql benchmark powered by Percona Server 5.7. You can find a summary with details here https://github.com/Percona-Lab-results/201607-tpcc-samsung-storage/blob/master/summary-tpcc-samsung.md

I have in my possession:

  • Samsung 850 Pro, 2TB: This is a SATA device and is positioned as consumer-oriented, something that you would use in a high-end user desktop. As of this post, I estimate the price of this device as around $430/TB.
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MySQL Enterprise Backup (MEB) and Oracle Storage Cloud

MEB 3.12.0 and above support cloud backup and restore using OpenStack-compatible object stores ("Swift"). This allows MySQL database users with Oracle Storage Cloud account to take backups and store them directly in the cloud and restore them from there.

The following steps illustrate how to set up and use MEB with Oracle Storage Cloud :

1) Create Oracle Storage Cloud account at https://cloud.oracle.com/storage . Once service gets activated, make a note of the following credentials that will be required in further steps :

  • Username

  • Password

  • Identity domain name

  • Service Instance Name : Customer-specified name of the service instance

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