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Displaying posts with tag: Triggers (reset)
MySQL audit logging using triggers

Introduction In this article, we are going to see how we can implement an audit logging mechanism using MySQL database triggers to store the old and new row states in JSON column types. Database tables Let’s assume we have a library application that has the following two tables: The book table stores all the books that are found in our library, and the book_audit_log table stores the CDC (Change Data Capture) events that happened to a given book record via an INSERT, UPDATE, or DELETE DML statement. The book_audit_log table is created... Read More

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How to Deal with Triggers in Your MySQL Database When Using Tungsten Replicator

Overview

Over the past few days we have been working with a number of customers on the best way to handle Triggers within their MySQL environment when combined with Tungsten Replicator. We looked at situations where Tungsten Replicator was either part of a Tungsten Clustering installation or a standalone replication pipeline.

This blog dives head first into the minefield of Triggers and Replication.

Summary and Recommendations

The conclusion was that there is no easy one-answer-fits-all solution – It really depends on the complexity of your environment and the amount of flexibility you have in being able to adjust. Our top level summary and recommendations are as follows:

If using Tungsten Clustering and you need to use Triggers:

  • Switch to …
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Why MySQL Stored Procedures, Functions and Triggers Are Bad For Performance

MySQL stored procedures, functions and triggers are tempting constructs for application developers. However, as I discovered, there can be an impact on database performance when using MySQL stored routines. Not being entirely sure of what I was seeing during a customer visit, I set out to create some simple tests to measure the impact of triggers on database performance. The outcome might surprise you.

Why stored routines are not optimal performance wise: short version

Recently, I worked with a customer to profile the performance of triggers and stored routines. What I’ve learned about stored routines: “dead” code (the code in a branch which will never run) can still significantly slow down the response time of a function/procedure/trigger. We will need to be careful to clean up what we do not need.

Profiling MySQL stored functions

Let’s compare these four simple stored functions (in MySQL 5.7): …

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MySQL 5.7 key features

The other day I was discussing new features of MySQL 5.7 with a Percona Support customer. After that conversation, I thought it would be a good idea to compile list of important features of MySQL 5.7. The latest MySQL 5.7.6 release candidate (RC) is out and is packed with nice features. Here’s a list of some MySQL 5.7 key features.

Replication Enhancements:

  • One of the top features in MySQL 5.7 is multi-source replication. With multi-source replication you can point multiple master server’s to slave so limitation of slave having only one master is lift off. There is nice blog post written by my colleague on multi-source replication you will find useful.
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A look at MySQL 5.7 DMR

So I figured it was about time I looked at MySQL 5.7. This is a high level overview, but I was looking over the MySQL 5.7 in a nutshell document:

So I am starting with a fresh Fedora 20 (Xfce) install.
Overall, I will review a few items that I found curious and interesting with MySQL 5.7. The nutshell has a lot of information so well worth a review.

I downloaded the MySQL-5.7.4-m14-1.linux_glibc2.5.x86_64.rpm-bundle.tar

The install was planned on doing the following
# tar -vxf …

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Support for multiple triggers per table for the same value of action/timing.

Introduction For a long time MySQL server supported only one trigger for every action (INSERT, UPDATE, DELETE) and timing (BEFORE or AFTER). In other words, there could be at most one trigger for every pair (action, timing). It means that a user couldn’t assign for example two BEFORE INSERT triggers for the same table t1. To workaround this restriction and allow several actions to fire on some table event, a user had to implement several stored procedures (one for each activity that would be implemented as independent trigger), create trigger for a table and call this stored procedures from the trigger. As of MySQL 5.7.2 this limitation has been removed. It means that starting the MySQL 5.7.2 a user can create for example, two BEFORE INSERT triggers, three AFTER INSERT triggers and four BEFORE UPDATE triggers for table t1. And this triggers will be called in the prescribed order determined (in generally) by the sequence in which triggers were …

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BEFORE triggers and NOT NULL columns in MySQL

Introduction   For a long time there was a Bug#6295 in implementation of BEFORE triggers related to handling of NOT NULL column. The problem was that if a column is declared as NOT NULL, it wasn’t possible to do INSERT NULL (or UPDATE to NULL) even though there was associated trigger, setting NOT-NULL value.

For example:

  • There is the table ‘t1′ with a NOT NULL column ‘c1′
  • The table has BEFORE INSERT trigger which sets the ‘c1′ column to NOT NULL value (SET NEW.c1 = 1)
  • User executes the SQL statement INSERT INTO t1 VALUES(NULL) that fails with the following error:     ERROR 1048 (23000): Column ‘c1′ cannot be null
  • The user will get the same error if there is a BEFORE UPDATE trigger that sets the ‘c1′ column to NOT NULL …
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“Duplicate Entry” error for key PRIMARY on UPDATE query (RBR + Triggers)

Recently, I have faced one interesting issue with Master(Active)-Master(Passive) replication (RBR + Triggers). Passive master was stopped due to “Duplicate Entry” error with update statement. It was something like this.

Last_Error: Error ‘Duplicate entry ‘29014131’ for key ‘PRIMARY” on query. Default database: ‘db’. Query: ‘UPDATE `db`.`tab1` SET `empid`=’103′, `name`=’Nilnandan’,  `address`=’India ‘, `postcode`=’D100′, `phone`=’878 515 7788’;

Interesting thing was , id (primary key column) was not updated in above update statement. Initially I was confused but when I check further, found that both servers has binglog_format = row and there are some triggers in “tab1” table which is inserting records into “tab2” (Another table).

After some investigation, found that “If under row-based replication the slave applied the triggers as …

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Stored procedures and Triggers


Having multiple ways to achieve a task is something we all enjoy as developers and DBAs. We find, develop and learn new ways to do things better and faster all the time.
At the risk of starting a debate, I am curious on others opinions or practices when it comes to Stored Procedures and Triggers. To use them or not versus code based functions ? Best case use versus worst case use? There is no real wrong answer here as it depends on your development application. Certainly some lean one way over another and there are more than enough valid reasons on both sides of the debate.
Here are couple of my thoughts on the topic....
I come from the dot.com bubble era , and from that I rarely use stored procedures or triggers. Back then PHP was still new, Perl dominated websites with the cgi-bin and MySQL did not have stored procedures or triggers. Thank goodness things have changed. Developing in those days, forced developers to …

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Statement-based vs Row-based Replication

Replication as most people know it, has mostly been SQL statement propagation from master to slave. This is known as "statement-based" replication. But there is also another kind of replication that is available, "the row-based replication" and that has quite a lot of benefits. In this post I intend on highlighting the advantages and disadvantages of both the types of replication to help you choose the best one. I also follow up with my own recommendation.

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