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Displaying posts with tag: mysql replication (reset)
Global Read-Scaling using Continuent Clustering

Did you know that Continuent Clustering supports having clusters at multiple sites world-wide with either active-active or active-passive replication meshing them together?

Not only that, but we support a flexible hybrid model that allows for a blended architecture using any combination of node types. So mix-and-match your highly available database layer on bare metal, Amazon Web Services (AWS), Azure, Google Cloud, VMware, etc.

In this article we will discuss using the Active/Passive model to scale reads worldwide.

The model is simple: select one site as the Primary where all writes will happen. The rest of the sites will pull events as quickly as possible over the WAN and make the data available to all local clients. This means your application gets the best of both worlds:

  • Simple deployment with no application changes needed. All writes …
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Mastering Continuent Clustering Series: Global Clustering with Active/Active Meshed Replication

Did you know that Continuent Clustering supports having clusters at multiple sites world-wide with active-active replication meshing them together?

Not only that, but we support a flexible hybrid model that allows for a blended architecture using any combination of node types. So mix-and-match your highly available database layer on bare metal, Amazon Web Services (AWS), Azure, Google Cloud, VMware, etc.

The possibilities are endless, as is the business value. This strong topology allows you to have all the benefits of high availability with local reads and writes, while spreading that data globally to be accessible in all regions. Latency is limited only by the WAN link and the speed of the target node.

This aligns perfectly with the distributed Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) model where customers and data span the globe. Applications have access to ALL the …

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Monitoring Master-Slave Replication in MySQL 8

MySQL 8 introduced a number of enhancements to improve both replication performance and the monitoring thereof. Improvements included more efficient replication of small updates on big JSON documents, the addition of Performance Schema tables for slave performance metrics, tracing and debug logging improvements, among others. With regards to monitoring, Group Replication has been improved by introducing new replication timestamps, additional columns to the performance schema, as well as by making the relationship between replication threads more efficient. We covered the various improvements to replication performance in the Replication Performance Enhancements in MySQL 8 blog. Today’s blog will provide some practical guidelines on monitoring your MySQL 8 master-slave and group (cluster) replication.

Two Types of MySQL Replication

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Setting up Basic Master-Slave Replication in MySQL 8

Since April 19th, when MySQL 8.0 became Generally Available (GA), the MySQL community has been abuzz with excitement over all of the new features and improvements. Many of new features were improvements to performance or monitoring, while others were specifically related to replication. We reviewed Replication Performance Enhancements in MySQL 8 recently. Today’s blog will describe how to set up a basic master-slave configuration with MySQL, using two servers on a single machine.

Replication Defined

MySQL replication is a process in which data from one MySQL database server (the master) is copied automatically to one or more MySQL database servers (the slaves). In the case of multiple slaves, these are usually referred to as a slave cluster. Replication should not to be confused with backup operations. Whereas the aim of backups is to protect the data and/or data structure, the role of replication is typically to spread …

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MySQL 8.0 Group Replication Limitations

We build highly available and fault tolerant MySQL database infrastructure operations for some of the largest internet properties in this planet,  Our consulting team spend several hours daily researching on MySQL documentation and MySQL blogs to understand what are the best possible ways we can build optimal, scalable, highly available and reliable database infrastructure operations for planet-scale web properties. The most common approach towards building a fault-tolerant system is to make all the components in the ecosystem redundant, To make it even simple, component can be removed and system should continue to operate as expected.  MySQL replication is an proven method to build redundant database infrastructure operations, operationally these systems are highly complex, requiring maintenance and administration of several servers instead of just one, You need Sr. DBAs to manage such systems.

MySQL Group Replication can operate …

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MySQL 8.0 InnoDB Cluster – Creating a sandbox and testing MySQL Shell, Router and Group Replication

MySQL’s InnoDB Cluster was released on Apr 12, 2017, with version 5.7 and is also included in MySQL version 8.0.

MySQL InnoDB cluster provides a complete high availability solution for MySQL. MySQL Shell includes AdminAPI which enables you to easily configure and administer a group of at least three MySQL server instances to function as an InnoDB cluster. Each MySQL server instance runs MySQL Group Replication, which provides the mechanism to replicate data within InnoDB clusters, with built-in failover. AdminAPI removes the need to work directly with Group Replication in InnoDB clusters, but for more information see Chapter 18, Group Replication which explains the details. MySQL Router can automatically configure itself based on the cluster you …

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Performance Improvements in MySQL 8.0 Replication

MySQL 8.0 became Generally Available (GA) on April 19th, a great moment for us working on MySQL at Oracle. It is now a “fully grown adult” packed with new features, and improvements to existing features, as described here.

This blog post focuses on the impact of replication performance improvements that went into MySQL 8.0.…

Taking advantage of new transaction length metadata

MySQL 8.0.2 introduced a small yet powerful per transaction metadata information containing the transaction length in binary logs.

MySQL binary logs are being used for many other things than MySQL replication or backup/recovery: replicate to Hadoop; replicate to other databases, such as Oracle; capture data change (CDC) and extract-transform-load (ETL); record change notification for cache invalidation; change tracking for differential backups; etc.…

MySQL 8.0: New Features in Replication

It is with extreme delight and a big smile on our face that we share the news that a new major MySQL release has been declared Generally Available (GA). The road to MySQL 8 was pretty eventful, sometimes painful and sometimes hard, always challenging, but nonetheless a great ride and an extremely rewarding journey for the engineers that have worked on it.…

Tungsten Clustering 6.0 and Tungsten Replicator 6.0 are now available!

Continuent is very pleased and excited to announce that the new Tungsten Clustering 6.0 and Tungsten Replicator 6.0 are now available for download by our customers. The 6.0 release is the culmination of over a years work within our clustering product in order to improve the functionality and manageability of what we now call our ‘Multimaster Clustering’ solution. This is the replacement for what we called the multi-site, multi-master (MSMM) clustering functionality in earlier releases. The multimaster clustering allows for multiple clusters, in multiple locations, to be linked together into a single composite cluster. Because it’s a composite cluster, you gain all of the functionality that’s already available in a cluster, such as:

  • High availability
  • Failover
  • Automated recovery
  • Read-write split
  • Maintenance without downtime

But it’s now applied to the …

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