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Displaying posts with tag: database (reset)
Percona Blog Poll Results: What Programming Languages Are You Using for Backend Development?

In this blog we’ll look at the results from Percona’s blog poll on what programming languages you’re using for backend development.

Late last year we started a poll on what backend programming languages are being used by the open source community. The three components of the backend – server, application, and database – are what makes a website or application work. Below are the results of Percona’s poll on backend programming languages in use by the community:

Note: There is a poll embedded within this post, please visit the site to participate in this post's poll.

One of the best-known and earliest web service stacks is the LAMP stack, which spelled out refers to Linux, Apache, MySQL and PHP/Perl/Python. We can see that this early model is still popular when it comes to the backend.

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How does a relational database work

Introduction While doing my High-Performance Java Persistence training, I came to realize that it’s worth explaining how a relational database works, as otherwise, it is very difficult to grasp many transaction-related concepts like atomicity, durability, and checkpoints. In this post, I’m going to give a high-level explanation of how a relational database works internally while … Continue reading How does a relational database work →

MySQL may return results in non-deterministic order with ‘order by’

Whenever we want a query’s results sorted, you may think of using the clause “order by.” You are correct: most of the time, MySQL will return the results in expected order with “order by.”

Be careful, though. Sometimes MySQL may return results in the non-deterministic order even with “order by.”

Indeed, if a query is ordered by a non-unique column, it may return results in an unexpected order. I tested the below example on MySQL 5.1.73, 5.5.54 and 5.6.19 and got the same result. However, when I applied the same example on MySQL 5.7.17, it returned the results in an unexpected order differently.

Follow me step-by-step and see how MySQL returns results in a non-deterministic order. Step 1-4 is for MySQL 5.1.73, 5.5.54 and 5.6.19, Step 5 is for MySQL 5.7.17. After the example, I will explain the reason behind this output.

Step 1. Create the table as …

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How to run integration tests at warp speed using Docker and tmpfs

Introduction As previously explained, you can run database integration tests 20 times faster! The trick is to map the data directory in memory, and my previous article showed you what changes you need to do when you have a PostgreSQL or MySQL instance on your machine. In this post, I’m going to expand the original … Continue reading How to run integration tests at warp speed using Docker and tmpfs →

MySQL Server log Maintenance

As a part database administration, DBA has to take care of sub-components of database like server logs and has to plan for maintenance activity for these components regularly.

MySQL has various types of log i.e binary log, error log, slow query log, general log for different purposes. And after certain time these logs will grow and you will start seeing issues like low disk space, a large number of logs etc.

MySQL allows you to flush logs using flush logs command, next “How to rotate and clean up old MySQL logs? ”

Linux has a utility called “logrotate” , using logrotate we can implement log rotation for MySQL server logs.

Binary logs: This one is critical if you have replication setup, By enabling  expire_logs_days mysql variable you can manage …

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Vote Percona in LinuxQuestions.org Members Choice Awards 2016

Percona is calling on you! Vote for Percona for Database of the Year in LinuxQuestions.org Members Choice Awards 2016. Help Percona get recognized as one of the best database options for data performance. Percona provides free, fully compatible, enhanced, open source drop-in replacement database software with superior performance, scalability and instrumentation.

LinuxQuestions.org, or LQ for short, is a community-driven, self-help website for Linux users. Each year, LinuxQuestions.org holds an annual competition to recognize the …

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A beginner’s guide to the Phantom Read anomaly, and how it differs between 2PL and MVCC

Introduction Unlike SQL Server which, by default, relies on the 2PL (Two-Phase Locking) to implement the SQL standard isolation levels, Oracle, PostgreSQL, and MySQL InnoDB engine use MVCC (Multi-Version Concurrency Control). However, providing a truly Serializable isolation level on top of MVCC is really difficult, and, in this post, I’ll demonstrate that it’s very difficult … Continue reading A beginner’s guide to the Phantom Read anomaly, and how it differs between 2PL and MVCC →

Three Things That Differentiate Amazon Aurora From MySQL

It's not always obvious what makes one database type distinct from another. What are the most significant ways that Amazon Aurora is different from MySQL? Clear separators aren't always featured or widely known, but even slight variables between two databases can prove valuable in choosing which one is right for you and your organization.

In the case of Aurora, there are at least three interesting things that make it unique and that present opportunities for particular uses. (Thanks in advance to @saileshkrish for helping us stay in-the-know on what Aurora can do.)

Adaptive Thread Pool

wow pic.twitter.com/KeVY5VBEMS

— Preetam (@PreetamJinka) December 21, 2016

Aurora's thread pool …

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MySQL Group Replication vs. Multi Source

In my previous post, we saw the usage of MySQL Group Replication (MGR) in single-primary mode. We know that Oracle does not recommends using MGR in multi-primary mode, but there is so much in the documentation and in presentations about MGR behavior in multi-primary, that I feel I should really give it a try, and especially compare this technology with the already existing multiple master solution introduced in 5.7: multi-source replication.

Installation

To this extent, I will set up two clusters using MySQL-Sandbox. The instructions for MGR in …

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MySQL group replication: installation with Docker

Overview

MySQL Group Replication was released as GA with MySQL 5.7.17. It is essentially a plugin that, when enabled, allows users to set replication with this new way.

There has been some confusion about the stability and usability of this release. Until recently, MySQL Group Replication (MGR) was only available in the Labs, which traditionally denotes a preview or an use-at-your-own-risk feature. Several months ago we saw the release of Group Replication as a Docker image, which allowed users to deploy a peer-to-peer cluster (every node is a master.) However, about one month after such release, word came from Oracle discouraging this setup, and inviting users to use Group Replicator in …

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