Showing entries 1 to 10 of 29
10 Older Entries »
Displaying posts with tag: MySQL Enterprise Edition (reset)
MySQL Enterprise Transparent Data Encryption (TDE) – provides at-rest encryption for physical InnoDB tablespace data files

With MySQL version 5.7.11 and up, Oracle continues to improve MySQL’s security features by adding MySQL Enterprise Transparent Data Encryption (TDE) for InnoDB tables stored in innodb_file_per_table tablespaces. This feature provides at-rest encryption for physical tablespace data files.

MySQL Enterprise TDE uses a two-tier encryption key architecture, consisting of a master encryption key and tablespace keys. When an InnoDB table is encrypted, a tablespace key is encrypted with the master key and the encrypted value of the tablespace key is stored in the tablespace header. When encrypting tablespace data, InnoDB transparently uses the master encryption key …

[Read more]
InnoDB Cluster: setting up Production… for disaster! (2/2)

Ok, so now we’re got our InnoDB Cluster a-clustering, MySQL Router a-routing, now we need some disaster to be a-disaster-recovering…

A foreword first.

If you’re looking to use Enterprise Backup to recover a single node and restore that node back into an existing InnoDB Cluster, LeFred takes you through that one nicely here.

Preparing for backup

On our single primary server, the one that allows write, which was ic2/10.0.0.12 in my case:

mysql -uroot -poracle << EOF 
SET sql_log_bin = OFF; 
 create user 'backup'@'%' identified by 'oracle';
 grant all on *.* to 'backup'@'%';
SET sql_log_bin = ON; 
EOF

Let’s create something to backup (if you haven’t already done so of course):

mysqlsh --uri …
[Read more]
InnoDB Cluster: setting up Production… for disaster! (1/2)

Want to setup InnoDB Cluster and be prepared for a Disaster Recovery scenario? Get ready:

Here’s a way to set up InnoDB Cluster using the 3 environments, on Oracle Linux 7.2, 5.7.19 MySQL Commercial Server, MySQL Shell 8.0.3 DMR, MySQL Router. As this is the first blog post for a complete disaster recovery scenario of InnoDB Cluster, we’ll also be installing MySQL Enterprise Backup.

If you’re new to InnoDB Cluster then I’d highly recommend looking at the following to understand how it works and what Group Replication, Shell & Router are.:

[Read more]
MySQL Enterprise Audit – parsing audit information from log files, inserting into MySQL table via LOAD DATA INFILE and Perl script

The MySQL Enterprise Audit plug-in is part of the MySQL Enterprise Edition (available through a paid license). Basically, Enterprise Audit tracks everything that is happening on your MySQL server, and can be used to protect/detect the misuse of information, and to meet popular compliance regulations including HIPAA, Sarbanes-Oxley, and the PCI Data Security Standard.

MySQL Enterprise Audit uses the open MySQL Audit API to enable standard, policy-based monitoring and logging of connection and query activity executed on specific MySQL servers. Designed to meet the …

[Read more]
MySQL Enterprise Edition Database Firewall – Control and Monitor SQL Statement Executions

As of MySQL 5.6.24, MySQL Enterprise Edition includes MySQL Enterprise Firewall, an application-level firewall (it runs within the mysql database process) that enables database administrators to permit or deny SQL statement execution based on matching against whitelists of accepted statement patterns. This helps harden MySQL Server against attacks such as SQL injection or attempts to exploit applications by using them outside of their legitimate query workload characteristics.

Each MySQL account registered with the firewall has its own whitelist of statement patterns (a tokenized representation of a SQL statement), enabling protection to be tailored per account. For a given account, the firewall can operate in recording or protecting mode, for training in the accepted statement …

[Read more]
Enterprise Monitor: “Add Bulk MySQL Instances” 50 in 1-click.

Carrying on with my MySQL 5.7 Labs Multi Source Replication scenario, I wanted to evaluate performance impact via MySQL Enterprise Monitor.

Whilst I opened my environment, I remember that I had generated lots of different skeleton scripts that allowed me to deploy the 50 servers quickly, and I didn’t want to add each of my targets 1 by 1 in MEM. So, I used one of the many features available, “Add Bulk MySQL Instances”.

So, I’ve got 50 (3001-3050) masters but only 1 slave (3100).

By default, MEM monitors it’s own repository, i.e. the 1/1 server being monitored in the All group.

I want to add my slave in first, because that’s how I’m organizing things, and I’ll take the opportunity to create the monitoring group I want to …

[Read more]
MySQL Dumping and Reloading the InnoDB Buffer Pool

MySQL’s default storage engine as of version 5.5 is InnoDB. InnoDB maintains a storage area called the buffer pool for caching data and indexes in memory. By keeping the frequently-accessed data in memory, related searches are retrieved much faster than reading from disk.

When you stop or restart MySQL, you lose the cached data stored in the buffer pool. There is a feature in MySQL 5.6 which allows you to dump the contents of the buffer pool before you shutdown the mysqld process. Then, when you start mysqld again, you can reload the contents of the buffer pool back into memory. You may also …

[Read more]
Using mysqldump and the MySQL binary log – a quick guide on how to backup and restore MySQL databases

Be sure to check out my other posts on mysqldump:
Scripting Backups of MySQL with Perl via mysqldump
Splitting a MySQL Dump File Into Smaller Files Via Perl
Creating and restoring database backups with mysqldump and MySQL Enterprise Backup – Part 1 of 2
– Creating and restoring database backups with mysqldump and MySQL Enterprise Backup – Part 2 of 2

I have already written several posts on using mysqldump. This post will be a quick guide to using …

[Read more]
MySQL Enterprise Backup 3.10: Teasing compression.

Ok, so I wanted to look into the new compression options of MEB 3.10.

And I would like to share my tests with you. Remember, they’re just this, tests, so please feel free to copy n paste and obtain your own results and conclusions, and should I say it, baselines, in order to compare future behaviour, on your own system.

An Oracle Linux 6.3 virtual machine with 3Gb RAM, 2 virtual threads, on a 1x quad core, windows laptop. Not pretty, but hey.

So, these tests are solely about backup. I’ll do restore when I get some *more* time.

 

First up, lets compare like with like, i.e. MEB version 3.9 & 3.10:

Let’s make this interesting, hence, want to use as much resources available as possible, read, write, process threads and number of buffers.

mysqlbackup --user=root --password=oracle --socket=/tmp/mysql5614.sock \
--backup-dir=/home/mysql/MEB/test --with-timestamp …
[Read more]
MySQL Enterprise Backup 3.10: Teasing compression.

Ok, so I wanted to look into the new compression options of MEB 3.10.

And I would like to share my tests with you. Remember, they’re just this, tests, so please feel free to copy n paste and obtain your own results and conclusions, and should I say it, baselines, in order to compare future behaviour, on your own system.

An Oracle Linux 6.3 virtual machine with 3Gb RAM, 2 virtual threads, on a 1x quad core, windows laptop. Not pretty, but hey.

So, these tests are solely about backup. I’ll do restore when I get some *more* time.

 

First up, lets compare like with like, i.e. MEB version 3.9 & 3.10:

Let’s make this interesting, hence, want to use as much resources available as possible, read, write, process threads and number of buffers.

mysqlbackup --user=root --password=oracle --socket=/tmp/mysql5614.sock \
--backup-dir=/home/mysql/MEB/test --with-timestamp …
[Read more]
Showing entries 1 to 10 of 29
10 Older Entries »