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Displaying posts with tag: Amazon Web Services (reset)
On the Database Market. Interview with Merv Adrian

“Anyone who expects to have some of their work in the cloud (e.g. just about everyone) will want to consider the offerings of the cloud platform provider in any shortlist they put together for new projects. These vendors have the resources to challenge anyone already in the market.”– Merv Adrian.

I have interviewed Merv Adrian, Research VP, Data & Analytics at Gartner. We talked about the the database market, the Cloud and the 2018 Gartner Magic Quadrant for Operational Database Management Systems.

RVZ

Q1. Looking Back at 2018, how has the database market changed?

Merv Adrian: At a high level, much is similar to the prior year. The DBMS market returned to double digit growth in 2017 (12.7% year over year in Gartner’s estimate) to $38.8 …

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How to Enable Binary Logging on an Amazon RDS Read Replica

One of the more common struggles I’ve had to assist with in regard to Amazon RDS is enabling binary logging on read replicas, or forming multi-tier replication in instances using version 5.6 or later after seeing that multi-tier replication is not supported in version 5.5 (for a reason that will become clear by the end of this post.)

First off, let’s have a look at the topology that I have in place in my AWS account. As you’ll see below I have a master, blog1, and a read replica that I created via the AWS console called blog2. You’ll also notice that, despite being supported, if I select instance actions while having blog2 highlighted the option to create a read replica is grayed out.

Further, if we use the MySQL CLI to connect to blog2 and check the global variables for log_bin and binlog_format, you’ll see that binary logging is off and binlog_format is set to statement. This is strange considering that the parameter …

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Top 5 Reasons to Move MySQL to AWS EC2

Many organizations are shifting toward the cloud, but how much are they moving over? New post explains top five reasons to move your MySQL database to AWS EC2.

The post Top 5 Reasons to Move MySQL to AWS EC2 appeared first on Datavail.

Monitoring Amazon RDS: Beyond Raw Logs

Amazon Relational Database Service (RDS) is a hosted database service in the AWS cloud. If your organization’s data is stored in one of the popular database systems, but on a company server or perhaps you’re renting a dedicated server, you might want to consider switching to Amazon RDS.  With Amazon RDS, you can choose from several relational database systems:  MySQL, MariaDB, Oracle, Postgres, and SQL Server, as well as Amazon Aurora.

There are many advantages to Amazon RDS, such as server scaling and load balancing of user traffic. Best of all, it can reduce the operational costs of running database software like MySQL. With Amazon RDS, you don’t need to worry about performing security updates, patching the operating system, or tuning the database. In fact, some of the patches Amazon deploys for MySQL and MariaDB are specifically designed to get better performance in a cloud setting.  Let’s look at some major …

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Amazon RDS updates February 2016

I think one of the big announcements that came out from the Amazon Web Services world in October 2015 was the fact that you could spin up instances of MariaDB Server on it. You would get MariaDB Server 10.0.17. As of this writing, you are still getting that (the MySQL shipping then was 5.6.23, and today you can create a 5.6.27 instance, but there were no .24/.25/.26 releases). I’m hoping that there’s active work going on to make MariaDB Server 10.1 available ASAP on the platform.

Just last week you would have noticed that Amazon has rolled out MySQL 5.7.10. The in-place upgrades are not available yet, so updating …

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3 Big Announcements from MariaDB (my take for Oct 2015)

Today I received about five emails with the subject: 3 Big Announcements from MariaDB. Maybe you did as well (else, read it online). October has brought on some very interest announcements, and I think my priority for the big announcements vary a little:

  1. MariaDB Server is now available on Amazon RDS – you wouldn’t believe how many people ask for this, as many now deploy using Amazon …
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AWS CloudFormation Now Supports Aurora, Amazon’s MySQL Compatible Database

AWS CloudFormation now supports Amazon Aurora!

Announcement: https://forums.aws.amazon.com/ann.jspa?annID=3286

Documentation:

http://docs.aws.amazon.com/AWSCloudFormation/latest/UserGuide/aws-resource-rds-dbcluster.html

Amazon Aurora is a MySQL-compatible, relational database engine that combines the speed and availability of high-end commercial databases with the simplicity and cost-effectiveness of open source databases. https://aws.amazon.com/rds/aurora/

AWS CloudFormation gives developers and systems administrators an easy way to create and manage a collection of related AWS resources, provisioning and updating them in an orderly and …

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Testing backup locks during Xtrabackup SST on Percona XtraDB Cluster

Background on Backup Locks

I was very excited to see Backup locks support in release notes for the latest Percona XtraDB Cluster 5.6.21 release. For those who are not aware, backup locks offer an alternative to FLUSH TABLES WITH READ LOCK (FTWRL) in Xtrabackup. While Xtrabackup can hot-copy Innodb, everything else in MySQL must be locked (usually briefly) to get a consistent snapshot that lines up with Innodb. This includes all other storage engines, but also things like table schemas (even on Innodb) and async replication binary logs. You can skip this lock, but it isn’t …

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Impressions from MongoDB Day London 2014

I visited MongoDB Day in London on November 6. Here are a few observations:

App-Developer Centric. It is interesting to see how much MongoDB is about developers; the ops side is something which is a necessary evil developers have to deal with. The ops topics covered in principle that there are no topics about choices of operating systems or hardware for MongoDB beyond flash and more memory.

Development Stacks. Being application centric there was good coverage of the MongoDB-powered stacks – MEAN and METEOR specifically got attention. Especially the METEOR presentation by Henrik Ingo was cool – real-time view synchronization between the Web browser (or mobile app) and database as well as the same language for server-side and client-side development is a really great concept. Though …

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Backup and restore of MySQL to OpenStack Swift

MySQL database usage is popular in OpenStack. Core OpenStack services for Compute (Nova), Storage (Cinder), Neutron (Networking), Image (Glance) and Identity (Keystone) all use MySQL database.

MySQL – as the world’s most popular database, runs inside OpenStack Virtual Machines and serves as database backend to OpenStack cloud based applications. The MySQL instances can be configured to run in virtual machines manually (by simply installing MySQL inside a VM and running it) or can be created in an on-demand fashion by OpenStack Database-as-a-Service (Trove).

In either case, the MySQL data is mission-critical. OpenStack cloud administrators and cloud guests/tenants need the ability to backup and restore their MySQL databases. mysqldump is traditional way of doing MySQL backups and restores. However, based on previous experiences of the MySQL community, it is widely known that mysqldump has …

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