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Displaying posts with tag: mysql server (reset)
Simple MySQL: Converting ANSI SQL to SQLite3

I was digging through some old project code and found this script. Sometimes one finds oneself in an odd situation and needs to convert regular SQL, say from a MySQL database dump, into SQLite3 format. There’s not too much else to say, but here is a script that helps with the process. It can likely be improved but this handles the items that came up during conversion on initial runs.

#!/bin/sh
####
# NAME: convert-mysql-to-sqlite3.sh
# AUTHOR: Matt Reid
# DATE: 2011-03-22
# LICENSE: BSD
####
if [ "x$1" == "x" ]; then
   echo "Usage: $0 "
   exit 
fi 
cat $1 |
grep -v ' KEY "' |   
grep -v ' UNIQUE KEY "' |
grep -v ' PRIMARY KEY ' |
sed '/^SET/d' |          
sed 's/ unsigned / /g' | 
sed 's/ auto_increment/ primary key autoincrement/g' |
sed 's/ smallint([0-9]*) / integer /g' | 
sed 's/ tinyint([0-9]*) / integer /g' |  
sed 's/ int([0-9]*) / integer /g' |      
sed 's/ character set [^ ]* / /g' |      
sed 's/ enum([^)]*) / varchar(255) /g' | 
sed 's/ on …
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MySQL: a convenient stored procedure for memory usage reporting

If you’ve ever been troubleshooting on the MySQL command line and needed to quickly see how much memory is being used then you’ve probably noticed that there are no built in commands to give you this data. Unlike other enterprise databases MySQL doesn’t have a very robust management system built in to help make the DBA’s life easier. It doesn’t come with built in Stored Procedures to report on usage statistics or generate handy reports; so we have to code them and import them to MySQL — no relying on Oracle to help us out here.

So, here’s a stored procedure that can be imported to MySQL and run whenever you need to see the memory usage statistics. Installation and usage info is built into the SP below. The SP can also be downloaded from the repo: https://bitbucket.org/themattreid/generic-sql-scripts/src/15c75632f1af/mysql-memory-report-storedproc.sql

##################################################################### …
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TunnelMaker, a simple script to generate multi-hop SSH tunnels

SSH tunnels provide a very effective means to access remote services and applications. Not only does it provide encryption of data between hosts, but it allows you to route connections between a sequence of servers, thus chaining connections. A common use of this method is to provide encrypted connections to MySQL servers so that user accounts can be limited to only “localhost” privileges, yet accessed from remote workstations without having to run MySQL+SSL.

The concept is simple, for example let’s say you have three servers: localhost (your workstation in America), a server in Europe, and a server in Japan. You want to access Apache running on port 80 on the Japan server but because of firewall restrictions you cannot access port 80 remotely, and to make things more difficult the Japan server only allows SSH connections from the Europe server’s IP. We can solve this by creating a SSH tunnel that forwards localhost port 8080 …

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SAN vs Local-disk :: innodb_flush_method performance benchmarks

If you’ve been tuning your MySQL database and have wondered what effect the innodb_flush_method settings have on write performance, then this information might help. I’ve recently been doing a lot of baseline load tests to show performance differences between localdisk and the new SAN we’re deploying. Since we run InnoDB for everything in production, and writes are very heavy, I decided to run comparison tests between two identical servers to find the best setting for innodb_flush_method. We have the following specs for the hardware:

  • Dell R610
  • 24 core Intel Xeon X5670 @ 2.93ghz
  • 72GB ECC RAM
  • Brocade 825 HBA
  • Local disk: RAID-10 15K SAS Ext3 (ugh)
  • SAN: Oracle 7420 with four Intel Xeon X7550 @ 2.00GHz, 512GB RAM, 2TB read-cache(MLC-SSD), 36GB write cache (SLC-SSD), 3 disk shelves populated with 60x2TB 7200RM SATA drives setup in mirrored format with striped …
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A New Platform Supported

Ever hear of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.0? It was released on November the 10th of 2010 . . just over a year ago. In the last couple of days Oracle released the latest version of MySQL Server (5.5.18). Along with the bug fixes, etc they released RPM packages that cover RH EL 6.

Finally. A year later.

Not one given to griping, but really..does it take that long to roll packages for the new version? There were no significant changes in the operating system..in fact the RH EL 5 packages worked on RHEL 6 from my (albeit) limited experience with the combination.

I don't jump onto new versions of operating systems as soon as they come out. I prefer to let others be my beta testers before I put something into production. However, waiting a year seems a bit extreme for this release.

Even so, it's out now so enjoy! Now we have no excuse for not deploying 5.5.

km

 

 

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Aloha – MySQL Dives into the Thread Pool

By now you have probably heard about the MySQL thread pool plugin and API, but you may not have fully processed the details. Here’s the quick summary:  With the new thread pool plugin, there is now an alternative way to handle connection threads in MySQL Enterprise Edition.  With the plugin, MySQL connection threads are shared like an extraordinarily well managed timeshare in Hawaii.  When one connection is “idle”, asking nothing of and expecting nothing from the database, another connection can use that same thread for its database requests.  Threads are released by each connection as soon as the request is completed and  go back into the pool for re-use – just like the theoretical timeshare is up for grabs on the weeks you are not there.

In the older, and still default connection thread model, threads are dedicated to a single client  for the life of the connection and there are as many …

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MySQL Enterprise Backup 3.6 - New backup streaming, integration with Oracle Secure Backup and other common backup media solutions

All DBAs understand the importance and priority of quick, reliable database backup and recovery operations.  In fact, dating back to my early days with MySQL, the most commonly requested product features from the MySQL user base have been around online, non-blocking backup solutions for running MySQL servers.  In response, Oracle now provides MySQL Enterprise Backup ("MEB") which performs high performant, online "hot" backups for MySQL databases.  MEB provides all of the backup/recovery features and functionality DBAs expect, all from a scriptable command line interface.  You can learn all about MEB in the related MySQL docs.

My congratulations and appreciation go out to Lars Thalmann and the MySQL Enterprise Backup engineering team for the …

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Quick How-To for DRBD + MySQL + LVS

I wrote this up a while ago and decided that I didn’t want to lose it in a shuffle of documents during my transition to a new workstation. It’s the basics of setting up Heartbeat (LVS) + DRBD (block replication between active/passive master servers) + MySQL. This should give you the basics of a H/A system without the benefits of SAN but also without the associated cost. The validity of this setup for H/A purposes is highly dependent on your workload and environment. You should know the ins and outs of your H/A solution before deciding to blame the system for not performing as expected. As with all production systems you should test, test, test and test some more before going live.

When I get around to it later I’ll post my How-To for setting up RHCS + SAN + MySQL. You can download the DRBD document PDF here: …

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Quadrant Framework – rev7 update adds DyGraphs support

Quick update to the framework that was released yesterday; I’ve added automatic graph generation. I chose DyGraphs due to the quick ability to enable support – the HTML is very quick and simply loads the CSV data. It has the same zooming features of Highcharts without the JS overhead.

Now when you run a load test you will get (in the output directory) a mixture of files: the main cumulative CSV and HTML file for the hostname that was tested, and then one CSV and HTML per report variable that was tested. This means you don’t have to drag the main CSV file into an alternate program or spend time parsing out certain variables one at a time to generate specific graphs.  I’ve also added support for limiting output of SNMP variables (LOAD,CPU,MEM). Head over here and download the update: http://code.google.com/p/quadrant-framework/

To enable …

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MySQL Load Testing Framework – initial release

It seems that everyone loves load testing these days. Problem is that everyone is using their own quick scripts, simple or complex, to drive their tests without the ability for other DBAs to duplicate those tests. Let’s say I write a great test and share my results and graphs on the blog – you want to run the same tests to see how your new DB servers compare in performance: this framework allows you to do that without duplicating any work or writing code. This is a basic release that will get the ball rolling. I’ve included some sample tests in the README file, so give them a try.

This codebase offers a user friendly framework for creating and visualizing MySQL database load test jobs. It is based around Sysbench, which is generally considered the industry standard load test application. The framework allows you to do the following:

  • standardize your tests without requiring you to write one-off bash scripts to handle …
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Showing entries 21 to 30 of 115
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