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Displaying posts with tag: performance_schema (reset)
MySQL Shell Plugins: InnoDB

Today, we will cover a totally different MySQL Shell plugin: InnoDB.

Currently only 3 methods have been created:

Those related to the Table space fragmentation, have already been covered in this recent article.

Let’s discover the getAlterProgress()method. This method allows us to have an overview of the progress of some alter statements status like:

  • stage/innodb/alter table (end)
  • stage/innodb/alter table (flush)
  • stage/innodb/alter table (insert)
  • stage/innodb/alter table (log apply index)
  • stage/innodb/alter table (log apply table)
  • stage/innodb/alter table (merge sort)
  • stage/innodb/alter table (read PK and internal sort)
  • stage/innodb/alter tablespace (encryption)

This is an output of the method:

As …

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MySQL Shell Plugins: check (part 2)

In the first part of this article related to the check plugin, we discovered information retrieved from the binary logs. This part, is about what Performance_Schema and SYS can provide us about the queries hitting the MySQL database.

Currently, 3 methods are available:

  • getSlowerQuery()
  • getQueryTempDisk()
  • getFullTableScanQuery()

The method’s name should be self explaining.

This is an overview of the parameters for each methods:

ext.check.getSlowQuery()ext.check.getQueryTempDisk()ext.check.getFullTableScanQuery()

Some methods allow a select parameter if only SELECT statements should be returned.

When only one query is returned (default), it’s also possible to …

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MySQL: Check who’s trying to access data they should not

To illustrate how easy it’s to see who’s trying to access data they have not been granted for, we will first create a schema with two tables:

mysql> create database mydata;
mysql> use mydata
mysql> create table table1 (id int auto_increment primary key, 
              name varchar(20), something varchar(20));
mysql> create table table2 (id int auto_increment primary key, 
              name varchar(20), something varchar(20));

Now, let’s create a user :

mysql> create user myuser identified by 'mypassword';

And as it’s always good to talk about SQL ROLES, let’s define 3 roles for our user:

  • myrole1: user has access to both tables in their entirety, reads and writes
  • myrole2: user has access only to `table2`, reads and writes
  • myrole3: user has only access to the column `name`of `table1` …
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Time in Performance Schema

I've seen questions like this:
"Is there a way to know when (date and time) the last statement captured in ... was actually ran?"more than once in some discussions (and customer issues) related to Performance Schema. I've seen answers provided by my colleagues and me after some limited testing. I've also noticed statements that it may not be possible.

Indeed, examples of wall clock date and time in the output of queries from the performance_schema are rare (and usually come from tables in the information_schemasys.format_time() function converts time to a nice, human readable format, but it still remains relative - it is not a date and time when something recorded in performance_schema happened.

In this post I'd like to document the answer I've seen and …

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Dynamic Tracing of MySQL Server With perf probe - Basic Example

I am going to write a series of blog posts based on my talks and experiences at Percona Live Europe 2019. The first one would be a kind of extended comment for a couple of slides from the "Tracing and Profiling MySQL" talk.

We can surely wait until Performance Schema instruments every other line of code or at least every important stage and wait in every storage engine we care about, but there is no real need for that. If you run any version of MySQL under Linux with more or less recent kernel (anything newer than 4.1 is good enough, in general), you can easily use dynamic tracing for any application (at least if there is symbolic information for the binaries), any time. As Brendan Gregg put it here:

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Fun with Bugs #89 - On MySQL Bug Reports I am Subscribed to, Part XXIII

I have to celebrate the anniversary of my last day in Oracle (that was 7 years ago!) somehow, and I think writing yet another blog post about Oracle MySQL bugs is a good way to do this. I am actually surprised (and happy) that public bugs database is still alive, maintained and considered important in Oracle, and I know who in Oracle was working hard all these years for this to happen!

In my previous post in this series I've stopped on Bug #95954 and had not completed review of interesting MySQL bug reports that I've subscribed to in June 2019. So, below I start with the next bug in my list, complete review for June and cover some bugs reported in July. There were many.

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MySQL 8.0: if I should optimize only one query on my application, which one should it be ?

Answering this question is not easy. Like always, the best response is “it depends” !

But let’s try to give you all the necessary info the provide the most accurate answer. Also, may be fixing one single query is not enough and looking for that specific statement will lead in finding multiple problematic statements.

The most consuming one

The first candidate to be fixed is the query that consumes most of the execution time (latency). To identify it, we will use the sys schema and join it with events_statements_summary_by_digest from performance_schemato retrieve a real example of the query (see this post for more details).

Let’s take a look at what sys schema has to offer us related to our mission:

> show tables like …
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MySQL 8.0 Memory Consumption on Small Devices

Recently, PeterZ pointed a huge difference in memory usage of MySQL 8.0 compare to MySQL 5.7. This can be an issue for small instances if the same configuration for buffers like the buffer pool are not changed.

As explained in Peter’s article, this can lead to the awakening of the so feared OOM Killer !

MorganT, pointed accurately in his comment what is the source of such difference and how this was then caused by the new instrumentation added in MySQL 8.0.

Nothing is free, even as a …

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MySQL InnoDB Cluster : Recovery Process Monitoring with the MySQL Shell Reporting Framework

As explained in this previous post, it’s now (since 8.0.16) possible to use the MySQL Shell Reporting Framework to monitor MySQL InnoDB Cluster.

Additionally, when a member of the MySQL InnoDB Cluster’s Group leaves the group for any reason, or when a new node is added from a backup, this member needs to sync up with the other nodes of the cluster. This process is called the Distributed Recovery.

During the Distributed Recovery, the joiner receives from a donor all the missing transactions using asynchronous replication on a dedicated channel.

It’s of course also possible to monitor the progress of this recovery process by calculating how many transactions have …

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Using the new MySQL Shell Reporting Framework to monitor InnoDB Cluster

With MySQL Shell 8.0.16, a new very interesting feature was released: the Reporting Framework.

Jesper already blogged about it and I recommend you to read his articles if you are interested in writing your own report:

  • https://mysql.wisborg.dk/2019/04/26/mysql-shell-8-0-16-built-in-reports/
  • https://mysql.wisborg.dk/2019/04/27/mysql-shell-8-0-16-user-defined-reports/

I this post, I will show you one user-defined report that can be used to monitor your MySQL InnoDB Cluster / Group Replication.

Preparation

Before being able to use the report, you need to download 2 files. The first one is the …

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