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Displaying posts with tag: information_schema (reset)
Fun with Bugs #90 - On MySQL Bug Reports I am Subscribed to, Part XXIV

Previous post in this series was published 3 months ago and the last Bug #96340 from it is already closed as fixed in upcoming MySQL 8.0.19. I've picked up 50+ more bugs to follow since that time, so I think I should send quick status update about interesting public MySQL bug reports that are still active.

As usual I concentrate mostly on InnoDB, replication and optimizer bugs. Here is the list, starting from the oldest:

  • Bug #96374  - "binlog rotation deadlock when innodb concurrency limit setted". This bug was reported by …
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Time in Performance Schema

I've seen questions like this:
"Is there a way to know when (date and time) the last statement captured in ... was actually ran?"more than once in some discussions (and customer issues) related to Performance Schema. I've seen answers provided by my colleagues and me after some limited testing. I've also noticed statements that it may not be possible.

Indeed, examples of wall clock date and time in the output of queries from the performance_schema are rare (and usually come from tables in the information_schemasys.format_time() function converts time to a nice, human readable format, but it still remains relative - it is not a date and time when something recorded in performance_schema happened.

In this post I'd like to document the answer I've seen and …

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MySQL & InnoDB Disk Space

Yesterday, Bhuvanesh published an article about how to verify the difference between allocated diskspace for a tablespace and the the data in it.

I commented with an old post explaining how to get some similar info only using SQL in case you don’t have filesystem access.

And finally, my friend Bill Karwin, commented how this info is not always accurate. Which, of course, I agree with.

This is why, I checked …

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Fun with Bugs #88 - On MySQL Bug Reports I am Subscribed to, Part XXII

It's Saturday night. I have a week of vacation ahead that I am going to spend at home, working on things I usually do not have time for. I already did something useful (created a couple of test cases for MariaDB bugs here and there, among other things), so why not to get some fun and continue my previous review of recent interesting MySQL bug report...

So, here is the list of 15 more MySQL community bug reports that I've subscribed to back in May and June 2019:

  • Bug #95491 - "The unused wake up in simulator AIO of function reserve_slot". I am impressed by …
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MySQL: CPU information from SQL

Do you know that it’s possible to get information from the CPUs of your MySQL Server from SQL ?

If you enable the status for the  INNODB_METRICS table in INFORMATION_SCHEMA, you will be able to query CPU information.

First, check if those status are enabled:

MySQL> SELECT name, subsystem, status 
FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.INNODB_METRICS where NAME like 'cpu%';
+---------------+-----------+----------+
| name | subsystem | status |
+---------------+-----------+----------+
| cpu_utime_abs | cpu | disabled |
| cpu_stime_abs | cpu | disabled |
| cpu_utime_pct | cpu | disabled |
| cpu_stime_pct | cpu | disabled |
| cpu_n | cpu | disabled |
+---------------+-----------+----------+
5 rows in set (0.00 sec)
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On Importing InnoDB Tablespaces and Row Formats

Let me start with a short summary and then proceed with a long story, code snippets, hexdumps, links and awk functions converted from the source code of MariaDB server. This blog post can be summarized as follows:

  • One can find row_format used to create table explicitly in the .frm file (or the outputs of SHOW CREATE TABLE or SHOW TABLE STATUS). Internals manual may help to find out where is it stored and source code reading helps to find the way to interpret the values.
  • For InnoDB tables created without specifying the row_format explicitly neither logical backup nor .frm file itself contains the information about the row format used. There are 4 of them (Redundant, Compact, Dynamic and Compressed). The one used implicitly is defined by current value of the …
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Fun with Bugs #78 - On Some Public Bugs Fixed in MySQL 5.7.25

Today I'd like to continue my tradition of ignoring MySQL 8 (after all, I can not even build 8.0.14 any more on my Ubuntu 14.04, it's not supported suddenly because of old gcc version) and, of all MySQL server versions released by Oracle this week, concentrate on bugs reported in public bugs database and fixed in the latest minor release of MySQL 5.7 branch, 5.7.25.

This time there is only one InnoDB community-reported bug fixed, Buig #87423 - "os0file.cc assertion failed 'offset > 0' in os_file_io_complete", from Vasily Nemkov. See also it's duplicate, …

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Fun with Bugs #77 - On MySQL Bug Reports I am Subscribed to, Part XIV

Slides for my talk about MySQL bugs at FOSDEM 2019 MySQL, MariaDB and Friends Devroon are ready, support customers decided not to break anything badly on weekend, so I have some free time for blogging.  As usual, when I do not have any better idea or useful recent real life experience to share I write about MySQL bugs.

Today I'd like to continue my review of interesting MySQL bug reports added by Community members in December, 2018. I'll review them starting from the oldest:

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How to grant privileges to users in MySQL 8.0

It seems, that this is a question that regularly shows up in forums or stackoverflow.

To start, let’s highlight the fact that in MySQL 8.0 it’s not any more possible to create a user directly from the GRANT command (ERROR 1410 (42000): You are not allowed to create a user with GRANT).

This means that to grant some privileges, the user must be created first.

Let’s create a user ‘user1‘ with ‘ChangeMe‘ as password that the user will have to change:

mysql> create user 'user1' identified by 'ChangeMe' password expire;
Query OK, 0 rows affected (1.35 sec)

Let’s try to connect to MySQL using that new created user:

 $ mysql -u …
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MySQL 8.0 and keywords

As you know, MySQL uses some keywords and some of them are also reserved.

Let’s have a look how to deal with that:

mysql> create table WRITE (id int auto_increment primary key, varying varchar(10), than int);
ERROR 1064 (42000): You have an error in your SQL syntax; check the manual that corresponds to your
MySQL server version for the right syntax to use near 'WRITE (id int auto_increment primary key,
varying varchar(10), than int)' at line 1

OK, it seems WRITE is a keyword I cannot use as table name. I’ve then two choices:

  • rename the table to something else like WRITE_TBL
  • use back-ticks (`) around the table like `WRITE`

Let’s use the first option:

mysql> create table WRITE_TBL (id int auto_increment primary key, varying varchar(10), than …
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