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Displaying posts with tag: operations (reset)
JFG Posted on the Percona Community Blog - A Nice Feature in MariaDB 10.3: no InnoDB Buffer Pool in Core Dumps

I just posted an article on the Percona Community Blog.  You can access it following this link:

A Nice Feature in MariaDB 10.3: no InnoDB Buffer Pool in Core Dumps

I do not know if I will stop publishing posts on my personal blog or use both, I will see how things go.  In the rest of this post, I will share why I published there and how things went in the process.

So there is a Percona

A Nice Feature in MariaDB 10.3: no InnoDB Buffer Pool in Core Dumps

MariaDB 10.3 is now generally available (10.3.7 was released GA on 2018-05-25). The article What’s New in MariaDB Server 10.3 by the MariaDB Corporation lists three key improvements in 10.3: temporal data processing, Oracle compatibility features, and purpose-built storage engines. Even if I am excited about MyRocks and curious on Spider, I am also very interested in less flashy but still very important changes that make running the database in production easier. This post describes such improvement: no InnoDB Buffer Pool in core dumps.

Hidden in the …

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Database Daily Ops Series: GTID Replication and Binary Logs Purge

This blog continues the ongoing series on daily operations and GTID replication.

In this blog, I’m going to investigate why the error below has been appearing in a special environment I’ve been working with on the last few days:

Last_IO_Errno: 1236
Last_IO_Error: Got fatal error 1236 from master when reading data from binary log:
'The slave is connecting using CHANGE MASTER TO MASTER_AUTO_POSITION = 1, but the
master has purged binary logs containing GTIDs that the slave requires.'

The error provides the right message, and explains what is going on. But sometimes, it can be a bit tricky to solve this issue: you need additional information discovered after some tests and readings. We try and keep Managed Services scripted, in the sense that our advice and best …

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Using gh-ost for online schema changes

The pt-online-schema-change tool has been a workhorse for years, allowing MySQL DBAs to alter tables with minimal impact to application workload, and before MySQL had native online alter capabilities. Although consistently grateful for the tool’s existence, I never liked the messiness of having to use and clean up triggers, and most DBAs have a horror story or two to tell about using any of the online alter methods.

When Github’s online schema transmogrifer (gh-ost; https://github.com/github/gh-ost) was released, then, I jumped on the chance to test it out.

Following are my testing notes. I tried out the flags available to run gh-ost from different locations in a replication setup, both functionally and under load. The load applied was via mysqlslap, using a …

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MaxScale Binlog Server HOWTO: Operations (including Chaining)

In the Install and Configure HOWTO, we learned how to install and configure a MaxScale Binlog Server.  In this HOWTO, I will present the common operations that you might need to perform when using this software.  Those operations include:

Purging Binary Logs, Chaining Binlog Servers, Saving Binary Log Files in the Non-Default Directory, Downloading Binary Logs other than First, Listing Connected

Syncronizing MySQL where tables have triggers and foreign keys defined

On a recent consulting engagement, the PSCE team were charged with what can be considered a fairly common task of synchronising tables between master and slave in MySQL Replication. On this occasion the  schema contained both foreign key constraints and triggers, this post describes how we avoided the potential problems related to such an operation.

The process to synchronise tables in MySQL is to first identify the differences between tables and then execute queries which bring those tables into a consistent state. The first part of the process can be handled by the pt-table-checksum tool, which steps through the table analysing sets of rows (chunks) and recording a checksum value. Then taking advantage of replication, the same process occurs on each of the slaves and the checksums can then be compared. Once the entire table has been processed, a second tool pt-table-sync can be used …

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Full table scans and MySQL performance

High season is coming, how do you make sure that MySQL will handle the increased load? Stress tests could help with that, but it’s not a good idea to run them in a production environment. In this case Select_scan, Select_full_join and other MySQL counters could quickly give you an idea of how many queries are not performing well and could cause a performance degradation as the load goes up.

Select_scan from SHOW GLOBAL STATUS indicates how many full table scans were done since last MySQL restart. Scanning the entire table is a resource intensive operation. It also forces MySQL to store unnecessary data in the buffer pool, wasting memory and IO resources.

Full scan of a tiny table would be quite fast so missing indexes could stay invisible until the load rises or the dataset grows up. This could also be the case for developers who work with too small data sets on their dev boxes. To prevent performance issues all newly added …

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The Road to MySQL 5.6: Default Options

When you're testing out a new version of MySQL in a non-production environment there is a temptation to go wild and turn on all kinds of new features.  Especially if you're reading the changelogs or the manual and scanning through options.  You want to start with the most reasonable set of defaults, right?  Maybe you're even doing benchmarks to optimize performance using all the new bells and whistles.

Resist the temptation!  If your goal is to upgrade your production environment then what you really want is to isolate changes.  You want to preform the upgrade with as little to no impact as possible.  Then you can start turning on features or making changes one-by-one.

Why?  Anytime you're doing a major upgrade to something as fundamental as your core RDBMS, there are many ways things can go wrong.  Performance regressions & incompatible changes, client/server incompatibilities …

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9 Tips for Going in Production with Galera Cluster for MySQL

August 25, 2014 By Severalnines

Are you going in production with Galera Cluster for MySQL? Here are 9 tips to consider before going live. These are applicable to all 3 Galera versions (Codership, Percona XtraDB Cluster and MariaDB Galera Cluster). 

 

1. Galera strengths and weaknesses

 

There are multiple types of replication and cluster technologies for MySQL, make sure you understand how Galera works so you set the right expectations. Applications that run on single instance MySQL might not work well on Galera, you might need to make some changes to the application or the workload might not be appropriate. We’d suggest you have a look at these resources: 

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New Webinar: Repair and Recovery for your MySQL, MariaDB and MongoDB/TokuMX Clusters

December 19, 2013 By Severalnines


Database clusters are pretty sophisticated distributed systems with complex dependencies between nodes. The failure of a node will generally impact the overall cluster, as the remaining nodes need to reconfigure themselves to continue to operate without the failed node. Since re-introducing a node will also affect the existing cluster, the timing could therefore be dependent on the state of the other nodes in the cluster. Repair and restarts often needs to be performed in a particular order in compliance with the redundancy model of the cluster so as not to jeopardize the normal functioning of existing nodes.

 

Webinar: Repair and Recovery for your MySQL, MariaDB and MongoDB/TokuMX clusters

 

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