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Displaying posts with tag: javascript (reset)
MQL-to-SQL: A JSON-based query language for your favorite RDBMS - Part I

Yesterday, I wrote about how I think this year's MySQL conference will differ from prior editions. I also wrote that I will attend and that I will be speaking on MQL-to-SQL.

I promised I would explain a little bit more background about my talk, so here's the first installment.

Abstract: MQL is a JSON-based database query language that has some very interesting features as compared to SQL, especially for modern ( …

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Speaking at the MySQL conference 2011

I just received a confirmation that my presentation proposal for the MySQL user conference 2011 was accepted! The title for my proposal is MQL-to-SQL: a JSON-based Query Language for RDBMS Access from AJAX Applications, and it covers pretty much everything implied by the title.

As always, the Hyatt Regency Hotel in Santa Clara, California serves as the venue. The conference will be held from April 11-14. Except for the venue and period, I think this year's conference will bear few similarities to previous editions. Let me try and explain.

This year's theme is "MySQL, the ecosystem and …

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Developer Week in Review

Here's what's new for the trendy developer this week:

Java's future on Apple: Slightly less in doubt

Last week, it looked like Apple was all "You're not welcome here, Java." In the changeable world that is Jobsland, this week Apple was offering to marry the language, reiterating their support for Java in OS X, and indicating that they would be supplying code and resources to the OpenJDK project.

As I've noted before, this makes sense for Apple, because it gets them out of the JVM business, and makes Oracle the one-stop shopping solution for all your JDK and JRE needs. It also means that the Mac can be added as a regression-tested target for a new version of Java, hopefully avoiding the kind of Java versioning snafus that rendered IBM's SPSS (or is it PAWS this week?) statistics …

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Four short links: 16 September 2010
  1. jsTerm -- ANSI-capable telnet terminal built in HTML5 with Javascript, Websocket, and Node.js. (via waxpancake on Twitter)
  2. MySQL EXPLAINer -- visualize the output of the MySQL EXPLAIN command. (via eonarts on Twitter)
  3. Google Code University -- updated with new classes, including C++ and Android app development.
  4. Cloudtop Applications (Anil Dash) -- Anil calling "trend" on multiplatform native apps with cloud storage. Another layer in the Web 2.0 story Tim's …
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Follow-up To Loading CSS And JS Conditionally

First of all, I'd like to thank everyone who read and gave their 2 cents about the [WordPress Plugin Development] How To Include CSS and JavaScript Conditionally And Only When Needed By The Posts post. The article was well received and will hopefully spark some optimizations around loading styles and scripts.

Here are some discussions and mentions around the web:

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Vote for me! ... widget for your blog.

Most likely you have seen Giuseppe's post showing the latest feature of Planet MySQL. Voting from RSS readers, was one feature I was really hoping for, since the day voting was announced. As I read most blogs using Google Reader.

Now, I don't remember if it was Dups who asked me, or if I asked him, but all I remember is that I ended up writing a little JavaScript widget, that you can add to your blog. This widget allows readers to vote for your blog on Planet MySQL, all from within your blog.

Why would you want to add this JavaScript to your blog?
Because you want to make it very easy for your readers to vote if …

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Hidden Features Of Perl, PHP, Javascript, C, C++, C#, Java, Ruby, Python, And Others [Collection Of Incredibly Useful Lists]

Introduction

StackOverflow is an amazing site for coding questions. It was created by Joel Spolsky of joelonsoftware.com, Jeff Atwood of codinghorror.com, and some other incredibly smart guys who truly care about user experience. I have been a total fan of SO since it went mainstream and it's now a borderline addiction (you can see my StackOverflow badge on the right sidebar).

The Story

Update 6/21/09: This server is currently under very heavy load (10-200), even with caching plugins enabled. Please bear with me as I try to resolve the situation.

Feel free to …

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A Pirate Captain visiting the Pacific Northwest

About three weeks from now, Rickard Falkvinge (founder of the Pirate Party) will be kicking off the Vancouver Open Web Conference. He’ll be presenting a keynote on how, in just three years, a party with an odd name organized around a narrow electronic frontier platform has become the fourth largest political party in Sweden. It’s an amazing story that makes a good parable about how the world is changing and is a fitting start for a conference that we’ve (meaning mostly Jeff Griffiths, Malcolm van Delst, Mike Cantelon and Tim Whiteway) worked hard to make a careful balance of accessible, …

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Sequential Web Frontends/Browsers are the Killer

Response times of any web application are very critical for the end-user experience. Steve Souders takes a detailed look at several large Web sites and concludes that 80-90% of the end-user response time is spent on the frontend, i.e., program code that is running inside your Web browser.

Traditional parallelization techniques and caching are without a doubt very effective in the design of scalable Web servers, databases, operating systems and other mission-critical software and hardware components. Assume that all these components are perfectly parallel and optimized, Amdhal's law still suggests that response time improvements will be very modest, or barely measurable.

Sequential Web Frontends/Browsers are the Killer

Response times of any web application are very critical for the end-user experience. Steve Souders takes a detailed look at several large Web sites and concludes that 80-90% of the end-user response time is spent on the frontend, i.e., program code that is running inside your Web browser.

Traditional parallelization techniques and caching are without a doubt very effective in the design of scalable Web servers, databases, operating systems and other mission-critical software and hardware components. Assume that all these components are perfectly parallel and optimized, Amdhal's law still suggests that response time improvements will be very modest, or barely measurable.

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