Showing entries 11 to 18
« 10 Newer Entries
Displaying posts with tag: slow query log (reset)
Tools and tips for analysis of MySQL’s Slow Query Log

MySQL has a nice feature, slow query log, which allows you to log all queries that exceed a predefined about of time to execute. Peter Zaitsev first wrote about this back in 2006 – there have been a few other posts here on the MySQL Performance Blog since then (check this and this, too) but I wanted to revisit his original subject in today’s post.

Query optimization is essential for good database …

[Read more]
PERFORMANCE_SCHEMA vs Slow Query Log

A couple of weeks ago, shortly after Vadim wrote about Percona Cloud Tools and using Slow Query Log to capture the data, Mark Leith asked why don’t we just use Performance Schema instead? This is an interesting question and I think it deserves its own blog post to talk about.

First, I would say main reason for using Slow Query Log is compatibility. Basic Slow query log with microsecond query time precision is available starting in MySQL 5.1, while events_statements_summary_by_digest table was only added in MySQL 5.6 which was out for …

[Read more]
Scalability Tips & Greatest Hits

Join 8000 others and follow Sean Hull on twitter @hullsean. In the past two years we’ve written a ton of material on scalability. Here’s the greatest hits… Why Generalists Are Better at Scaling the Web The internet stack is a complex infrastructure of interlocking components. An scalability engineer must be adept at Linux, plus webservers, […]

The post Scalability Tips & Greatest Hits appeared first on Scalable Startups.

Scalability Happiness – A Quiet Query Log

Join 7500 others and follow Sean Hull on twitter @hullsean.

There’s a lot of talk on the web about scalability. Making web applications scale is not easy. The modern web architecture has so many moving parts. How can we grapple with the underlying problem?

Also: Why Are MySQL DBAs So Hard to Find?

The LAMP stack scales well

The truth that is half right. True there are a lot of moving parts, and a lot to setup. The internet stack made up of Linux, Apache, MySQL & PHP. LAMP as it’s called, was built to be resilient, dynamic, and scalable. It’s essentially why Amazon works. Why what they’re doing is possible. Windows …

[Read more]
How LOCK TABLES interacts with the MySQL slow query log

Here’s a little trivia that you might find helpful. Suppose that I have the following in the MySQL slow query log (abbreviated for clarity):


# User@Host: root[root] @ localhost [127.0.0.1]
# Time: 100919 17:58:52
# Query_time: 9.648427  Lock_time: 8.648039
select sleep(1) from t limit 1;

To get this into the slow query log, I set the long_query_time to 0 and opened two sessions. In one session I ran LOCK TABLES t WRITE, and in the other I tried to select from that table. As you can see above, 1) LOCK TABLES contributes to the Lock_time number, and 2) the Query_time is the sum of execution time and lock time.

Now, I’ll set long_query_time = 2 and run the same test. What happens? Nothing shows up in the slow query log, because 3) the time spent waiting for table locks doesn’t count towards the slow query time threshold.

A final note: …

[Read more]
MySQL Workbench Plugin: Slow Query Log Statistics

This is my first attempt at creating a plugin for MySQL Workbench.  As a first step, I’ve created a plugin that summarizes the slow query log if it’s output to the slow_log table, which is an option available in MySQL version 5.1 or newer.  It’s similar to the mysqldumpslow perl script, except that it doesn’t require perl, which should be more convenient on Windows.  In my next update, the plugin will provide the same summary statistics for the slow query log file on disk.

While the slow query log reports query time, lock time, rows sent and rows examined for each query; it’s often useful to group and aggregate similar queries for analysis.  For example, here’s a sample of the plugin output, which is sorted by count, after just a few clicks on a drupal6 site:

The plugin …

[Read more]
Dynamic General and Slow Query Log Before MySQL 5.1

This is a hack, but it is a good one. I was looking at some machines on a new client, and they had the general log turned on. I was surprised, because it was a fairly busy server, and they had had many problems with the server a few months ago. I thought perhaps they had turned on the general log to diagnose a problem and forgotten to turn it off, or something similar.

When I looked at the log on disk, I saw it was a symlink to /dev/null. They were running MySQL 5.0, so I immediately realized that it was a hack to have a general log they could “turn on” without having to restart mysqld.

On a different server, I saw the same link to /dev/null done with a slow query log.

The drawbacks to doing it this way is that MySQL still has the overhead of writing to the log file. The I/O overhead is greatly reduced because the writes are to /dev/null, but there’s still overhead from other resources such as RAM, CPU, etc.

[Read more]
Load Testing Tools and Tips

Tips on load testing your web site.

read more

Showing entries 11 to 18
« 10 Newer Entries