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Displaying posts with tag: relay log (reset)
Exploring MySQL Binlog Server – Ripple

MySQL does not limit the number of slaves that you can connect to the master server in a replication topology. However, as the number of slaves increases, they will have a toll on the master resources because the binary logs will need to be served to different slaves working at different speeds. If the data churn on the master is high, the serving of binary logs alone could saturate the network interface of the master.

A classic solution for this problem is to deploy a binlog server – an intermediate proxy server that sits between the master and its slaves. The binlog server is set up as a slave to the master, and in turn, acts as a master to the original set of slaves. It receives binary log events from the master, does not apply these events, but serves them to all the other slaves. This way, the load on the master is tremendously reduced, and at the same time, the binlog server serves …

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Setting up Master-Slave Replication with MySQL

Replication enables data from one MySQL server to be replicated on one or more other MySQL servers. Replication is mostly used as scale-out solution. In such a solution, all writes and updates take place on the master server, while reads take place on one or more slaves. This model is actually known as master-slave replication and this is the kind of replication that I will be setting up in this post.

Relay binlog corrupt

The slave failed with the error that the relay binlog is corrupt. It had copied close to 12 binlogs from the master and they were yet to be applied. Unfortunately those binlogs have been purged on the master. Now to sync up cleanly we might have to refresh data from the master which can be costly since it was a 290 GB database. We had the option of shutting down the server. We thought we can try our luck with a crazy hack. We shutdown the server. Tried reading the binlog using mysqlbinlog utility from the corrupt position. It failed as expected. Then we tried reading from the next immediate position and it went through fine. Now we had a proof that our hack might work. We opened the relay-log.info and incremented the second row by a value of one. Then we started the server. Boom, the slave started running and we were saved from a great pain of resyncing the slave.

PS : We might have missed one transaction in this hack, but that was ok for …

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Skip duplicate entries in a slave

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