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Displaying posts with tag: Open Source (reset)
Duplicate Indexes in MySQL

Why do we sometimes want to keep duplicate indexes?

I’ve done dutiful DBA work in the past to identify and remove what are commonly called duplicate indexes. That is, those indexes that look like (a) and (a,b). The thought is that a query will utilize an index as easily on (a) as on (a,b), and removing (a) will save storage cost and write performance. I’ve had the experience, though, of removing (a) and seeing performance tank.

(As an aside, these are really redundant indexes. A duplicate index would be (a,b) and (a,b) by two different names – this can commonly be done by object relational mapping (ORM) or other automated schema creation tools. I’ll call (a) and (a,b) redundant indexes below.)

This test is on Percona Server 5.7.14 with the sys schema installed and performance schema enabled.

Given two tables with the same number of rows and …

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MySQL on AWS: RDS vs EC2

When moving your MySQL instances to AWS, you would probably have to deal with this decision. This article will highlight some of the key factors that need to be considered in order to help you determine which is the most cost-effective solution for serving your data.

 

Introduction

RDS is based on EC2, so in this post I will focus on the benefits and disadvantages of using the former, versus migrating MySQL into user-managed EC2 instances.

The value of RDS resides in simplified provisioning and administration. Several of the most common maintenance tasks such as minor version upgrades, backups, and slave creation are automated and can be managed from the AWS console. On the other hand, RDS imposes some limitations to MySQL functionality so it could be offered “as a Service” while delivering a safe and consistent user experience. Within those limitations we can mention:

  • Storage …
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Binary Log Growth Handling in MySQL

So today we look at an aspect of capacity management or planning and how it relates to MySQL and its Logging.  For this blog I’m primarily going to look at MySQL’s binary logs. They have a tendency to grow, and will continue to if not held in check.  Happily, they tend to be easy to… Read More »

MySQL multi-instance Group Replication on systemd

In this blog post, I’d like to take a look at a few different things such as MySQL Group Replication, multi-instance MySQL setups on systemd and shell scripting the whole mess to make it easy to build, and easy to rebuild.  To be honest, it took a little help from Shinguz’s blog to get the… Read More »

Auditing MySQL Users With McAfee Plugin

It is a common auditing requirement to log user connection events, including whether or not authentication was successful.
There are a number of alternatives available for MySQL, but unfortunately there is no built-in functionality at the time of this writing. In this post we will discuss auditing MySQL users with McAfee plugin, which is available under GPL Version 2 license.

Installation instructions

These apply to debian-based hosts, but instructions for red hat are similar.

1. Download latest plugin release from github.

At the time of this post for MySQL 5.5 you can get:

wget https://bintray.com/mcafee/mysql-audit-plugin/download_file?file_path=1.0.9-release%2Faudit-plugin-mysql-5.5-1.0.9-585-linux-x86_64.zip

2. Decompress …

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Ansible Dependencies for Docker Containers

I recently had the opportunity to test out Ansible’s ability to interact with docker containers. Some might ask why we would want Ansible to connect to running containers. Afterall, we can build the containers to our liking using ansible-container, or even mundane tools such as Docker’s Dockerfile. Also, we can link configuration files at runtime to override the container’s settings where appropriate.

The point, though, is to leverage Ansible’s capability as an orchestration tool.

As a very basic example, assume that you have plays for your non-docker environment to ensure MySQL users exist. How do you do that with Docker containers?

You have a few options:

  1. Assume you have users with appropriate privileges that can connect remotely, you can execute the Ansible plays locally to connect to MySQL over the …
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gh-ost 1.0.17: Hooks, Sub-second lag control, Amazon RDS and more

gh-ost version 1.0.17 is now released, with various additions and fixes. Here are some notes of interest:

Hooks

gh-ost now supports hooks. These are your own executables that gh-ost will invoke at particular points of interest (validation pass, about to cut-over, success, failure, status, etc.)

gh-ost will set various environment variables for your executables to pick up, passing along such information as migrated/ghost table name, elapsed time, processed rows, migrated host etc.

Sub-second lag control

At GitHub we're very strict about replication lag. We keep it well under 1 second at most times. …

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Database Challenges and Innovations. Interview with Jim Starkey

“Isn’t it ironic that in 2016 a non-skilled user can find a web page from Google’s untold petabytes of data in millisecond time, but a highly trained SQL expert can’t do the same thing in a relational database one billionth the size?.–Jim Starkey.

I have interviewed Jim Starkey. A database legendJim’s career as an entrepreneur, architect, and innovator spans more than three decades of database history.

RVZ

Q1. In your opinion, what are the most significant advances in databases in the last few years?

Jim Starkey: I’d have to say the “atom programming model” where a database is layered on a substrate of peer-to-peer replicating distributed objects rather than disk files. The atom programming model enables scalability, redundancy, high availability, and distribution not available in traditional, disk-based database …

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Some thoughts on recent events (repost)

[something happened to this post and I am reposting it]
It was suggested by Monty that the posts I've made about MariaDB are for publicity. This simply isn't true. I would have much preferred a different outcome in my interactions with MariaDB. I figured that they would end up giving me a hard time, and I'd be stubborn and we'd both hate each other for as long as I could keep from leaving. A quick separation actually seems much better in such context. Regardless, I would have preferred to speak amicably to the MariaDB Corporation about switching the license back, or at least moving to the new license at the time of the notification of the community, ie, changing the license so that bug fixes for 1.3.4 were not mingled with new 2.0 features.

It could have been easily possible to have a 1.3.5 release that fixes the major bugs in 1.3 and then release a new set of features as 2.0. This would have been at least reasonable, but by …

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On Open Source and Business Choices

Open Source is a whole-of-process approach to development that can produce high-quality products better tailored to users’ real world needs.  A key reason for this is the early feedback cycle built into that complete process.

Simply publishing something under an Open Source license (while not applying Open Source development processes) does not yield the same quality and other benefits.  So, not all Open Source is the same.

Publishing source of a product “later” (for instance when the monetary benefit has diminished for the company) is meaningless.  In this scenario, there is no “Open Source benefit” to users whatsoever, it’s simply a proprietary product. There is no opportunity for the client to make custom modifications or improvements, or ask a third party to work on such matters – neither is there any third party opportunity to verify and validate either code …

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