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Displaying posts with tag: plugin (reset)
Understanding SHOW VARIABLES: DISABLED and NO values

When you use SHOW VARIABLES LIKE “have_%” to see whether a particular feature is enabled, you will note the value of NO for some, and DISABLED for others. These values are not intrinsically clear for the casual onlooker, and often cause confusion. Typically, this happens with SSL and InnoDB. So, here is a quick clarification!

  • NO means that the feature was not enabled (or was actively disabled) in the build. This means the code and any required libraries are not present in the binary.
  • DISABLED means that the feature is built in and capable of working in the binary, but is disabled due to relevant my.cnf settings.
  • YES means the feature is available, and configured in my.cnf.

SSL tends to show up as DISABLED, until you configure the appropriate settings to use it …

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Thoughts on using MySQL plugins

I'm giving thoughts on the viability of MySQL plugins. This is due to a particular experience I've had, which is thankfully solved. However, it left some bitter taste in my mouth.

MySQL plugins are a tricky business. To create a plugin, you must compile it against the MySQL version you wish the users to use it with. Theoretically, you should compile it against any existing MySQL version, minors as well (I'm not sure whether it may sometimes or most times work across minor versions).

But, most important, you must adapt your plugin to major versions.

Another option for plugin makers, is to actually not recompile it, but rather provide with the source code, and let the end user compile it with her own MySQL version. But here, too, the code must be compatible with whatever changes the new MySQL version may have.

And if it doesn't compile with the new MySQL version?

That's what happened to me. The …

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MariaDB User Feedback

One thing which we, as developers of MariaDB, run into is that our personal database needs are not the same as many of our users. In fact, our needs are quite light compared to many. We have a MariaDB website, a company website, a knowledgebase, this blog, and that’s about it. None of them are particularly high traffic compared to what our customers have. But apart from talking to our customers, which are just a small percentage of the total MariaDB population, we wanted to have a way of finding out how MariaDB is used “in the real world”, so to speak.

Asking lots and lots of people to fill out surveys isn’t any fun, and we would have to keep repeating the survey ad nauseum to get useful information over time on trends and such. …

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IOPS, innodb_io_capacity, and the InnoDB Plugin

In the InnoDB plugin, a new variable was added named innodb_io_capacity, which controls the maximum number of I/O operations per second that InnoDB will perform (which includes the flushing rate of dirty pages as well as the insert buffer (ibuf) batch size).

First off, let me just say this is a welcome addition (an addition provided by the Google Team, fwiw).

However, before this was configurable, the internal hard-coded value for this was 100. But when this became configurable, the default was increased to 200.

For many systems, this is not an issue (i.e., the overall system can perform 200 IOPS).

However, there are still many disks (which is often the bottleneck) out there that are …

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Drizzle 7 plugins

Last week I wrote about my experience compiling Drizzle 7 on Mac OS X 10.6. Then David Shrewsbury informed me of his nearly identical blog post: Installing Drizzle from source on OS X. Once Drizzle 7 was running on my box, I immediately looked to see what plugins where available because Drizzle uses a lot of plugins and they are one of its notable differences from MySQL. In my humble opinion, Drizzle’s plugins will primarily influence how database professionals evaluate and decide whether or not to use Drizzle because so many of Drizzle’s features are plugins. Therefore, let’s look briefly at some the plugins included with Drizzle 7.

The plugin directory of the Drizzle 7 tarball lists 79 plugins. Each plugin …

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SQLStats 1.3 released

I have released SQLStats 1.3 now, and it is available for download from sourceforge. The changes are small:

  • Cleaned up the build script a bit.
  • Fixed a bug that caused statements to be counted twice.
  • Made statement comparison non case sensitive.
  • A small fix to the normalizer, that would miss a few statements in some cases.

SQLStats is a plugin for MySQL 5.5 and up that allows live monitoring of SQL statements, without using the general query log and with the added benefit of managing statements with the literals removed. read more in my previous blog-post in the subject.

Enjoy!
/Karlsson

Monitoring MySQL SQL statements the way it SHOULD be done!

You may have read a previous post of mine, back in April this year, where I wrote about using the MySQL 5.5 Audit interface to SQL Statement monitoring. There was a bunch of comments and some ideas, but not much happened. Until now that is.

Hereby I release the first version of SQLStats, which is a much enhanced version of what I described in the previous post. This is a MySQL Plugin for MySQL 5.5 that allows you to monitor the most recently executed, and the most frequently executed statements using 2 INFORMATION_SCHEMA tables. The thing is not very complex, to be honest, but it does do the job. So what was the job then? Well, looking at what this plugin does, it goes something like this:

  • Allows you to monitor ALL SQL statements executed by the server.
  • The SQL statements are "normalized", …
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MySQL 5.5.7 - Can we trust it being RC, or?

I just saw that MySQL 5.5.7 RC had been released, and reading the releasenotes made me more than a fair bit suspicious. In some kind of general agreement on what constitutes a "beta" release, this is when the software has reached a level of maturity when no more major features are to be introduced. MySQL (and many others) has broken that rule at times, and the rule is not enforced or something.

What constitutes an RC release though, in my mind, but I really want to know what you think, is software that is really 100% feature complete. There may be, but hopefully there aren't, even any major bugs to iron out. In short, it is "A Candidate to Release", and as close to GA as you can get. I have not seen this rule broken much, really.

With MySQL 5.5.7, this is an rc, as was the previous release, 5.5.6, and this time there is a really major feature introduced between these two release, pluggable authentication. And before I …

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Book review: MySQL 5.1 plugin development
MySQL 5.1 Plugin Development,
by Sergei Golubchik and Andrew Hutchings.
Packt Publishing, 2010.
Executive summary: Highly recommended. If you want to develop MySQL extensions, buy this book. It's a must, written by two expert professionals who probably know more than anyone else on this matter. The book is full of practical examples explained with the theoretical information necessary to make it stick.

This book fills a gap in the world of MySQL documentation. Although the MySQL docs are extensive and thorough, to the point that sometimes you wished that the writers were less verbose and stick more to the topic, when …
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Second Drizzle Beta (and InnoDB update)

We just released the latest Drizzle tarball (2010-10-11 milestone). There are a whole bunch of bug fixes, but there are two things that are interesting from a storage engine point of view:

  • The Innobase plugin is now based on innodb_plugin 1.0.6
  • The embedded_innodb engine is now named HailDB and requires HailDB, it can no longer be built with embedded_innodb.

Those of you following Drizzle fairly closely have probably noticed that we’ve lagged behind in InnoDB versions. I’m actively working on fixing that – both for the innobase plugin and for the HailDB library.

If building the HailDB plugin (which is planned to replace the innobase plugin), you’ll need the latest …

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