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Displaying posts with tag: bug (reset)
MySQL 5.5.8 GA and PHP 5.3.4 don’t get along with libmysql

Today I discovered that you are unable to compile the current stable PHP version 5.3.4 with yesterday’s MySQL 5.5.8 GA release. I was able to download the current MySQL 5.1.54 and compile without issue.

You can find all the gory details in Bug #58987 however I was able to edit a number of MySQL include file to get a build. Does this mean it’s a MySQL packaging problem or a PHP problem I don’t know, but I would hope that Oracle in the testing phase of a GA release test this against popular programming languages starting with the LAMP stack to ensure compatibility such as what I uncovered.

Storage Engine API state graph

Drizzle still has a number of quirks inherited from the MySQL Storage Engine API (e.g. BLOBs, row buffer, CREATE SELECT and lack of DDL transaction boundaries, key tuple format). One of the things we fixed a long time ago was to have proper methods for StorageEngines to be called for: startTransaction, startStatement, endStatement, commit and rollback.

If you’ve had to implement a transactional storage engine in MySQL you will be well aware of the pattern of “in every …

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Update on “A Tale Of a Bug”

The bug I talked about a little while ago has now also had the fix I wrote committed to the mysql-trunk 5.5.6-m3 repository.

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A tale of a bug…

So I sometimes get asked if we funnel back bug reports or patches back to MySQL from Drizzle. Also, MariaDB adds some interest here as they are a lot closer (and indeed compatible with) to MySQL. With Drizzle, we have deviated really quite heavily from the MySQL codebase. There are still some common areas, but they’re getting rarer (especially to just directly apply a patch).

Back in June 2009, while working on Drizzle at Sun, I found a bug that I knew would affect both. The patch would even directly apply (well… close, but I made one anyway).

So the typical process of me filing a MySQL bug these days is:

  • Stewart files bug
  • In the next window of Sveta being awake, it’s verified.

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ENUM now works properly (in Drizzle)

Over at the Drizzle blog, the recent 2010-06-07 tarball was announced. This tarball release has my fixes for the ENUM type, so that it now works as it should. I was quite amazed that such a small block of code could have so many bugs! One of the most interesting was the documented limit we inherited from MySQL (see the MySQL Docs on ENUM) of a maximum of 65,535 elements for an ENUM column.

This all started out from a quite innocent comment of Jay‘s in a code review for adding support for the ENUM data type to the embedded_innodb engine. It was all pretty innocent… saying that I should use a constant instead of the magic 0×10000 number as a limit …

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Best Practices: Additional User Security

By default MySQL allows you to create user accounts and privileges with no password. In my earlier MySQL Best Practices: User Security I describe how to address the default installation empty passwords.

For new user accounts, you can improve this default behavior using the SQL_MODE variable, with a value of NO_AUTO_CREATE_USER. As detailed via the 5.1 Reference Manual

NO_AUTO_CREATE_USER

Prevent the GRANT statement from automatically creating new users if it would otherwise do so, unless a nonempty password also is specified.

Having set this variable I attempted to show the error of operation to demonstrate in my upcoming “MySQL Idiosyncrasies that bite” presentation. …

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New CREATE TABLE performance record!

4 min 20 sec

So next time somebody complains about NDB taking a long time in CREATE TABLE, you’re welcome to point them to this :)

  • A single CREATE TABLE statement
  • It had ONE column
  • It was an ENUM column.
  • With 70,000 possible values.
  • It was 605kb of SQL.
  • It ran on Drizzle

This was to test if you could create an ENUM column with greater than 216 possible values (you’re not supposed to be able to) – bug 589031 has been filed.

How does it compare to MySQL? Well… there are other problems (Bug 54194 – ENUM limit of 65535 elements isn’t true filed). Since we don’t have any limitations in Drizzle due to the FRM file …

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MySQL 5.5.4 looks awesome.

Been at the MySQL conference the last few days, and I have to say, I’m really blown away by MySQL 5.5.4‘s improvements.  Last year I keynoted and I begged Oracle on stage to realize that MySQL and InnoDB under one roof represented opportunity.  It’s clear they heard the community – this is some serious progress, and right when we needed it.

Jeremy Zawodny’s blog post covers most of the stuff I’m really excited about, and there are some great detailed technical slides …

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Ubuntu Karmic's Network Manager Issues

Since Ubuntu 8.04 aka Hardy Heron, I've had issues with every new release. As Ubuntu evolves into being a viable desktop OS alternative, its complexity has been growing and with the new and improved looks new challenges arise. This bug in particular has been very difficult to diagnose and I can't imagine anyone without enough Linux experience to overcome it on their own, so I decided to summarize the steps I took to fix it ... and vent my frustration at the end.
The SymptomI came across the issue for the first time while trying Ubuntu's Karmic Netbook remix. After overcoming the typical Broadcom wifi driver, Network Manager would connect, but Firefox would fail to load the web pages 90% of the time. Using ping in the command line worked just fine. Maybe I needed to update the software packages to get the latest patches, surprise, apt-get was having similar problems and timing out. So the problem …

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Will your production MySQL server survive a restart?

Do you know if your production MySQL servers will come back up when restarted? A recent support episode illustrates a number of best practices. The task looked trivial: Update a production MySQL server (replication master) with a configuration tuned and tested on a development server. Clean shutdown, change configuration, restart. Unfortunately, the MySQL daemon did not just ‘come back’, leaving 2 sites offline. Thus begins an illuminating debugging story. First place to look is the daemon error log, which revealed that the server was segfaulting, seemingly at the end of or just after InnoDB recovery. Reverting to the previous configuration did not help, nor did changing the InnoDB recovery mode. Working with the client, we performed a failover to a replication slave, while I got a second opinion from a fellow engineer to work out what had gone wrong on the server. Since debug symbols weren’t shown in the stack trace, we needed …

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