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Displaying posts with tag: indexing (reset)
Advanced JSON for MySQL: indexing and aggregation for highly complex JSON documents

What is JSON
JSON is an text based, human readable format for transmitting data between systems, for serializing objects and for storing document store data for documents that have different attributes/schema for each document. Popular document store databases use JSON (and the related BSON) for storing and transmitting data.

Problems with JSON in MySQL
It is difficult to inter-operate between MySQL and MongoDB (or other document databases) because JSON has traditionally been very difficult to work with. Up until recently, JSON is just a TEXT document. I said up until recently, so what has changed? The biggest thing is that there are new JSON UDF by Sveta Smirnova, which are part of the MySQL 5.7 Labs releases. Currently the JSON UDF are up to version 0.0.4. While these new UDF are a welcome edition to the MySQL database, they don't solve the really tough …

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Introducing ‘MySQL 101,’ a 2-day intensive educational track at Percona Live this April 15-16

Talking with Percona Live attendees last year I heard a couple of common themes. First, people told me that there is a lot of great advanced content at Percona Live but there is not much for people just starting to learn the ropes with MySQL. Second, they would like us to find a way to make such basic content less expensive.

I’m pleased to say we’re able to accommodate both of these wishes this year at Percona Live! We have created a two-day intensive track called “MySQL 101” that runs April 15-16. MySQL 101 is designed for developers, system administrators and DBAs familiar with other databases but not with MySQL. And of course it’s ideal for anyone else who would like to expand their professional experience to include MySQL. The sessions are designed to lay a solid foundation on many aspects of MySQL development, design and …

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Why Unique Indexes are Bad

Before creating a unique index in TokuMX or TokuDB, ask yourself, “does my application really depend on the database enforcing uniqueness of this key?” If the answer is ANYTHING other than yes, do not declare the index to be unique. Why? Because unique indexes may kill your write performance. In this post, I’ll explain why.

Unique indexes are a strange beast: they have no impact on standard databases that use B-Trees, such as MongoDB and MySQL, but may be horribly painful for databases that use write optimized data structures, like TokuMX’s Fractal Tree(R) indexes. How? …

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Purging old rows with QueryScript: three use cases

Problem: you need to purge old rows from a table. This may be your weekly/monthly cleanup task. The table is large, the amount of rows to be deleted is large, and doing so in one big DELETE is too heavy.

You can use oak-chunk-update or pt-archiver to accomplish the task. You can also use server side scripting with QueryScript, offering a very simple syntax with no external scripting, dependencies and command line options.

I wish to present three cases of row deletion, with three different solutions. In all cases we assume some TIMESTAMP column exists in table, by which we …

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532x Multikey Index Insertion Performance Increase for MongoDB with Fractal Tree Indexes

In my three previous MongoDB blogs I wrote about our implementation of Fractal Tree(R) indexes on MongoDB, showing a 10x insertion performance increase, a 268x query performance increase, and a comparison of covered indexes and clustered indexes. These benchmarks show the difference that rich and efficient indexing can make to your MongoDB workload.

Given the high performance of Fractal Tree Indexes, we’ve created a new benchmark to test our ability to handle indexing large …

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My Talk Next Week at HighLoad++

Next week I’ll be visiting Moscow to talk at Highload++. The conference will take place during Monday 22nd and Tuesday 23rd at the Radisson hotel. I will be giving my personal version of an indexing talk that my colleagues have given in meetups and conferences in the US.

Highload++ conference is targeted to address the issues of complex high traffic web properties. Most of these sites depend on databases to deliver their content, record the traffic and report the application activities in real time. As I learned early in my career at MySQL, the database schema and in particular the indexing strategy, are critical to achieve the highest possible performance out of the database. I’ll be reviewing the basic strategies to define the right indexes. I will also cover TokuDB’s Fractal Tree® and Cluster …

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Looking for MongoDB users to test Fractal Tree Indexing

In my three previous blogs I wrote about our implementation of Fractal Tree Indexes on MongoDB, showing a 10x insertion performance increase, a 268x query performance increase, and a comparison of covered indexes and clustered indexes. The benchmarks show the difference that rich and efficient indexing can make to your MongoDB workload.

It’s one thing for us to benchmark MongoDB + TokuDB and another to measure real world performance. If you are looking for a way to improve the performance or scalability of your MongoDB deployment, we can help …

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MongoDB Index Shootout: Covered Indexes vs. Clustered Fractal Tree Indexes

In my two previous blogs I wrote about our implementation of Fractal Tree Indexes on MongoDB, showing a 10x insertion performance increase and a 268x query performance increase. MongoDB’s covered indexes can provide some performance benefits over a regular MongoDB index, as they reduce the amount of IO required to satisfy certain queries.  In essence, when all of the fields you are requesting are present in the index key, then MongoDB does not have to go back to the main storage heap to retrieve anything.  My benchmark results are …

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How common_schema split()s tables - internals

This post exposes some of the internals, and the SQL behind QueryScript's split. common_schema/QueryScript 1.1 introduces the split statement, which auto-breaks a "large" query (one which operates on large tables as a whole or without keys) into smaller queries, and executes them in sequence.

This makes for easier transactions, less locks held, potentially (depending on the user) more idle time released back to the database. split has similar concepts to oak-chunk-update and …

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Table split(...) for the masses

(pun intended)

common_schema's new split statement (see release announcement) auto-splits complex queries over large tables into smaller ones: instead of issuing one huge query, split breaks one's query into smaller queries, each working on a different set of rows (a chunk).

Thus, it is possible to avoid holding locks for long times, allowing for smaller transactions. It also makes for breathing space for the RDBMS, at times boosting operation speed, and at times prolonging operation speed at will.

In this post I show how split exposes itself to the user, should the user wish so.

split can manage queries of the …

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