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Displaying posts with tag: network (reset)
Using ProxySQL to connect to IPv6-only databases over IPv4

It’s 2018. Maybe now is the time to start migrating your network to IPv6, and your database infrastructure is a great place to start. Unfortunately, many legacy applications don’t offer the option to connect to MySQL directly over IPv6 (sometimes even if passing a hostname). We can work around this by using ProxySQL’s IPv6 support which was added in version 1.3. This will allow us to proxy incoming IPv4 connections to IPv6-only database servers.

Note that by default ProxySQL only listens on IPv4. We don’t recommended changing that until this bug is resolved. The bug causes ProxySQL to segfault frequently if listening on IPv6.

In this example I’ll use centos7-pxc57-1 as my database server. It’s running …

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MySQL Performance : IP port -vs- UNIX socket impact in 8.0 GA

Generally, when I'm analyzing MySQL Performance on Linux with "localhost" test workloads, I'm configuring client connections to use IP port (loopback) to connect to MySQL Server (and not UNIX socket) -- this is still at least involving IP stack in the game, and if something is going odd on IP, we can be aware ahead about. And indeed, it already helped several times to discover such kind of problems even without network links between client/server (like this one, etc.). However, in the past we also observed a pretty significant difference in QPS results when IP port was used comparing to UNIX socket (communications via UNIX socket were going near 15% faster).. Over a time with newer OL kernel releases this gap became smaller and smaller. But in all such …

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Network attacks on MySQL, Part 6: Loose ends

Backup traffic

After securing application-to-database and replication traffic, you should also do the same for backup traffic.

If you use Percona XtraBackup with streaming than you should use SSH to send your backup to a secure location. The same is true for MySQL Enterprise Backup. Also both have options to encrypt the backup itself. If you send your backup to a cloud service this is something you should really do, especially if it is not sent via SSH or HTTPS.

And mysqldump and mysqlbinlog both support SSL. And you could use GnuPG, OpenSSL, WinZIP or any other tool to encrypt it.

Sending credentials

You could try to force the client to send credentials elsewhere. This can be done if you can control the parameters to the mysql client. It reads the config from /etc/my.cnf, ~/.my.cnf and ~/.mylogin.conf but if you for example specify a login-path and a hostname.. it connects to that host, but with the …

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Network attacks on MySQL, Part 5: Attack on SHA256 based passwords

The mysql_sha256_password doesn't use the nonce system which is used for mysql_new_password, but instead forces the use of RSA or SSL.

This is how that works:

  1. The client connects
  2. The server changes authentication to sha256 password (or default?)
  3. The server sends the RSA public key.
  4. The client encrypts the password with the RSA public key and sends it to the server.
  5. The server decrypts the password with the private key and validates it.

The problem is that the client trusts public key of the server. It is possible to use --server-public-key-path=file_name. But then you need to take care of secure public key distribution yourself.

So if we put a proxy between the client and the …

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Network attacks on MySQL, Part 4: SSL hostnames

In my previous blogs I told you to enable SSL/TLS and configure it to check the CA. So I followed my advice and did all that. Great!

So the --ssl-mode setting was used a few times as a solution. And it has a setting we didn't use yet: VERIFY_IDENTITY. In older MySQL versions you can use --ssl-verify-server-cert. Both turn on hostname verification.

The attack

Get any certificate which is trusted by the configured CA, this can for example be a certificate from a development machine. And use that with a man-in-the-middle proxy.

Then the client:

  1. Checks if SSL is uses (--ssl-mode=REQUIRED)
  2. Verify if the certificate is signed by a trusted CA (--ssl-mode=VERIFY_CA)

Both checks succeed. But the certificate might be for testhost01.example.com and the database server might be prod-websitedb-123.example.com. …

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Network attacks on MySQL, Part 3: What do you trust?

In my previous blogs I told you to enable SSL/TLS and force the connection to be secured. So I followed my advice and did forced SSL. Great!

So now everything is 100% secure isn't it?

No it isn't and I would never claim anything to be 100% secure.

There are important differences in the SSL/TLS implementations of browers and the implementation in MySQL. One of these differences is that your browser has a trust store with a large set of trusted certificate authorities. If the website you visit has SSL enabled then your browser will check if the certificate it presents is signed by a trusted CA. MySQL doesn't use a list of trusted CA's, and this makes sense for many setups.

The key difference is that a website has clients (browsers) which are not managed by the same organization. And for MySQL connections the set of clients is often much smaller are more or less managed by one organization. Adding a CA for a set of …

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Network attacks on MySQL, Part 2: SSL stripping with MySQL

Intro

In my previous blog post I told you to use SSL/TLS to secure your MySQL network connections. So I followed my advice and did enable SSL. Great!

So first let's quickly verify that everything is working.

So you enabled SSL with mysql_ssl_rsa_setup, used a OpenSSL based build or put ssl-cert, ssl-key and ssl-ca in the mysqld section of your /etc/my.cnf and now show global variables like 'have_SSL'; returns 'YES'.

And you have configured the client with --ssl-mode=PREFERRED. Now show global status like 'Ssl_cipher'; indicates the session is indeed secured.

You could also dump traffic and it looks 'encrypted' (i.e. not readable)...

With SSL enabled everything should be safe isn't it?

The handshake …

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Network attacks on MySQL, Part 1: Unencrypted connections

Intro

In a set of blog posts I will explain to you how different attacks on the network traffic of MySQL look like and what you can do to secure your systems againt these kinds of attacks.

How to gain access

To gain access to MySQL network traffic you can use tcpdump, dumpcap, snoop or whatever the tool to capture network packets on your OS is. This can be on any device which is part of the connnection: the server, the client, routers, switches, etc.

Besides application-to-database traffic this attack can also be done on replication traffic.

Results

This allows you to extract queries and result sets.

The default password hash type mysql_new_password uses a nonce to protect against password sniffing. But when you change a password this will be sent accross the wire by default. Note that MySQL 5.6 and newer has …

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Network Traffic Analyzer with RaspberryPI

Motivation Melbourne just won the “most liveable city 2016”, the 5th time in a row. That’s awesome, but it comes with a price, and the one you’d think of: internet here sucks! Sounds weird, isn’t it? Well, one of the reasons Melbourne is such a great city, is it’s size, the amount of people in [...]

MySQL TCPCOPY

we use tcpcopy to make real traffic on our core systems. Many problems will be found in advance if we enlarge queries several times.

Read this PDF TCPCOPY

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