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Displaying posts with tag: Programming (reset)
Tech Messages | 2012-05-11

A special extended edition of Tech Messages for 2011-09-21 through 2012-05-11:

Fun with Bash :: one liners

Here are some quick and easy bash commands to solve every day problems I run into. Comment and leave some of your own if you like. I might update this post with new ones over time. These are just some common ones.

Iterate through directory listing and remove the file extension from each file
ls -1 | while read each; do new=`echo $each |sed 's/\(.*\)\..*/\1/'` && echo $new && mv "$each" "$new"; done

Output relevant process info, and nothing else
ps axo "user,pid,ppid,%cpu,%mem,tty,stime,state,command"| grep -v "grep" | grep $your-string-here

Setup a SOCKS5 proxy on localhost port 5050, to tunnel all traffic through a destination server
ssh -N -D 5050 username@destination_server'

Setup a SOCKS5 proxy via a remote TOR connection, using local port 5050 and remote TOR port 9050
ssh -L 5050:127.0.0.1:9050 username@destination_server'

Display text or code file contents to screen but don't display any # comment lines
sed -e '/^#/d' $1 < …
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Living in the Prove It Culture

Engineering cultures differ from shop to shop. I have been in the same culture for 13 years so I am not an expert on what all the different types are. Before that I was living in Dilbert world. The culture there was really weird. The ideas were never yours. It was always some need some way off person had. A DBA, a UI "expert" and some product manager would dictate what code you wrote. Creativity was stifled and met with resistance.

I then moved to the early (1998) days of the web. It was a start up environment. In the beginning there were just two of us writing code. So, we thought everything we did was awesome. Then we added some more guys. Lucky for us we mostly hired well. The good hires where type A personalities that had skills we didn't have. They challenged us and we challenged them. On top of that, we had a CEO who had been a computer hacker in his teens. So, he had just enough knowledge to challenge us as well. Over the …

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Making rpm builds a first class citizen: How?

In my previous post I explained why I believe the production of RPM and DEB packages should be more integrated with the rest of your development process. Now it's time to look into how you can put the RPM build scripts inside your main source code repository, and in particular how I did that to produce RPM packages for Drizzle.

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Making rpm builds a first class citizen: Why?

Last weekend I released rpm files for the latest Drizzle Fremont beta (announcement). As part of that work I've also integrated the spec file and other files used by the rpmbuild into the main Drizzle bzr repository (but not yet merged into trunk). In this post I want to explain why I think this is a good thing, and in a follow up post I'll go into what I needed to do to make it work.

(And speaking of stuff you can download, phpMyAdmin 3.5.0-alpha1 now supports Drizzle!)

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Could closed core prove a more robust model than open core?

When participating recently in a sprint held at Google to document four free software projects, I thought about what might have prompted Google to invest in this effort. Their willingness to provide a hotel, work space, and food for some thirty participants, along with staff support all week long, demonstrates their commitment to nurturing open source.

Google is one of several companies for which I'll coin the term "closed core." The code on which they build their business and make their money is secret. (And given the enormous infrastructure it takes to provide a search service, opening the source code wouldn't do much to stimulate competition, as I point out in a posting on O'Reilly's radar blog). But they depend on a huge range of free software, ranging from Linux …

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What's New in CFEngine 3: Making System Administration Even More Powerful

CFEngine is both the oldest and the newest of the popular tools for automating site administration. Mark Burgess invented it as a free software project in 1993, and years later, as deployments in the field outgrew its original design he gave it a complete rethink and developed the powerful concept of promise theory to make it modular and maintainable. In this guise as version 3, CFEngine stands along with two other pieces of free software, Puppet and Chef, as key parts of enterprise computing. Along the way, Burgess also started a commercial venture, CFEngine AS, that maintains both the open source and proprietary versions of CFEngine.

Diego Zamboni has recently taken the position of Senior Security Advisor at CFEngine AS and is writing a book for O'Reilly on CFEngine 3. I talked to him this week about the recent new …

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Developer Week in Review: These things always happen in threes

Fall is being coy this year in the Northeast. We've been having on and off spells of very mild, almost summer-like weather over the last few weeks. That trend seems to be finally ending, alas, as there is possible snow forecasted for the weekend in New Hampshire. As the old joke goes, if you don't like the weather here, just wait five minutes.

The fall also brings hunting to the area. The annual moose season just concluded (you need to enter a special lottery to get a moose permit), but deer season is just about to open. My son and I won't be participating this year, but we recently purchased the appropriate tools of the trade, a shotgun to hunt in southern NH (where you can't hunt deer with a rifle) and a Mosin Nagant 91/30 for the rest of the state. The later is probably overkill, but my son saved up his pennies to buy it, being a student of both WWII and all things …

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New algorithm for calculating 95 percentile

The 95 percentile for query response times is and old concept; Peter and Roland blogged about it in 2008. Since then, MySQL tools have calculated the 95 percentile by collecting all values, either exactly or approximately, and returning all_values[int(number_of_values * 0.95)] (that’s an extreme simplification). But recently I asked myself*: must we save all values? The answer is no. I created a new algorithm** for calculating the 95 percentile that is faster, more accurate, and saves only 100 values.***

Firstly, my basis of comparison is the 95 percentile algo used by …

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Developer Week in Review: Lion drops pre-installed MySQL


A busy week at Casa Turner, as the infamous Home Renovations of Doom wrap up, I finish the final chapters of "Developing Enterprise iOS Applications" (buy a copy for all your friends, it's a real page turner!), pack for two weeks of vacation with the family in California (Palm Springs in August, 120 degrees, woohoo!), and celebrate both a birthday and an anniversary.



But never fear, WIR fans, I'll continue to supply the news, even as my MacBook melts in the sun and the buzzards start to circle overhead.

The law of unintended consequences

If you decide to install Lion Server, you may notice something missing from the included software: MySQL. Previous releases of OS X server offered pre-installed MySQL command line and GUI tools, but they are …

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