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Displaying posts with tag: golang (reset)
Summer 2023: Fuzzing Vitess at PlanetScale

My name is Arvind Murty, and from May to July of 2023, I worked on Vitess via an internship with PlanetScale. I was first introduced to Vitess when I was in high school as a potential open-source project for me to work on. I had been interested in working on one because they’re a relatively easy way to get some real-world experience in large-scale software development. Vitess seemed like an good place to start, so I started contributing, mostly on internal cleanup.

A new Protocol Buffers generator for Go

Although the main interface between applications and a Vitess database is through the MySQL protocol, Vitess is a large and complex distributed system, and all the communication between the different services in a Vitess cluster is performed through GRPC. Because of this, all service boundaries and messages between Vitess' systems are specified using Protocol Buffers. The history of Vitess' integration with Protocol Buffers is rather involved: We have been using and keeping up to date with the Go Protocol Buffers package since its earliest releases, up until May last year, when Google released a new Go API for Protocol Buffers, which is not backwards compatible with the previous Go package.

Code generation in Vitess

Cross posting link Golang is a wonderful language. It's simple, and most of the time not confusing or surprising. This makes it easy to jump into library code and start reading and quickly understand what's going on. On the other hand, coming from other languages, there are a few features that would make our lives easier. We are building Vitess using mostly golang, and most of us are happy with this choice.

Writing MySQL proxy in GO for learning purposes: Part 2 — decoding connection phase server response

Writing MySQL Proxy in GO for self-learning: Part 2 — decoding handshake packet

After we built a generic TCP proxy, we can continue with our journey. Today’s goal will be to understand the MySQL Protocol, receive, decode, encode and send to the client the first packet sent by the MySQL Server.

MySQL connections threads

Each client connection to MySQL Server handled by a thread. MySQL is portable, so the underhood threads implementation is system dependent (Windows, macOS, and Linux have their own threads implementation).

What important to us, it’s to understand that a single client connection …

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Quarantine Journey: Writing MySQL Proxy in GO for self-learning: Part 1 — TCP Proxy

Writing MySQL Proxy in GO for self-learning: Part 1 — TCP Proxy

Weekend. Quarantine. If you bored like me, and want to learn something new, you can join my journey of writing yet another MySQL Proxy Server.

In the past, I had a crazy idea of writing MySQL Proxy Server. The first reason was to understand the MySQL Communication Protocol to let me write more efficient programs. The second one was to learn more about low-level network programming concepts in general. Finally, I have time at least to start… and you can join me!

The real usage of MySQL Proxy can vary:

  • Testing and benchmarking of the infrastructure
  • Testing your applications for dealing with MySQL network failures and delays
  • Wrap the MySQL usage with own business layer
  • Load balancing
  • Multiplexing

Prelude

I’m not sure if I can …

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How to Connect Golang with MySQL

Today, I will describe MySQL database connectivity with golang. MySQL is most popular open source relational database. I will let you know step by step how to golang connect with MySQL database. I assumed you have configured golang environment within your system, if not please configure golang environment into your system. The golang have MySQL […]

The post How to Connect Golang with MySQL appeared first on Phpflow.com.

When MySQL Goes Away

Handling MySQL errors in Go is not easy. There are a lot of MySQL server error codes, and the Go MySQL driver as its own errors, and Go database/sql has its own errors, and errors can bubble up from other packages, like net.OpError. Consequently, Go programs tend not to handle errors. Instead, they simply report errors: err := db.Query(...).Scan(&v) if err != nil { return err } And then the error is logged or reported somewhere.

When MySQL Goes Away

Handling MySQL errors in Go is not easy. There are a lot of MySQL server error codes, and the Go MySQL driver as its own errors, and Go database/sql has its own errors, and errors can bubble up from other packages, like net.OpError. Consequently, Go programs tend not to handle errors. Instead, they simply report errors: err := db.Query(...).Scan(&v) if err != nil { return err } And then the error is logged or reported somewhere.

New Stats Exposed in Go's database/SQL Package

If you’re someone who keeps up with the Go development cycle, then you’ll know that a couple of weeks ago Go entered its feature-freeze for the Go 1.11 release. One of the changes for this upcoming release that caught my eye was to the database/sql package. Daniel Theophanes contributed a change that introduces several new counters available via the DB.Stats() method.

If you’re not familiar with it, DB.Stats() returns a DBStat structure containing information about the underlying sql.DB that the method is called on. Up to this point, the struct has had a single field, tracking the current number of open connections to the database. Daniel’s patch introduces a number of …

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New Stats Exposed in Go's database/SQL Package

If you’re someone who keeps up with the Go development cycle, then you’ll know that a couple of weeks ago Go entered its feature-freeze for the Go 1.11 release. One of the changes for this upcoming release that caught my eye was to the database/sql package. Daniel Theophanes contributed a change that introduces several new counters available via the DB.Stats() method.

If you’re not familiar with it, DB.Stats() returns a DBStat structure containing information about the underlying sql.DB that the method is called on. Up to this point, the struct has had a single field, tracking the current number of open connections to the database. Daniel’s patch introduces a number of …

[Read more]
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