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Displaying posts with tag: transactions (reset)
How to extract change data events from MySQL to Kafka using Debezium

Introduction As previously explained, CDC (Change Data Capture) is one of the best ways to interconnect an OLTP database system with other systems like Data Warehouse, Caches, Spark or Hadoop. Debezium is an open source project developed by Red Hat which aims to simplify this process by allowing you to extract changes from various database … Continue reading How to extract change data events from MySQL to Kafka using Debezium →

How does a relational database work

Introduction While doing my High-Performance Java Persistence training, I came to realize that it’s worth explaining how a relational database works, as otherwise, it is very difficult to grasp many transaction-related concepts like atomicity, durability, and checkpoints. In this post, I’m going to give a high-level explanation of how a relational database works internally while … Continue reading How does a relational database work →

A beginner’s guide to the Phantom Read anomaly, and how it differs between 2PL and MVCC

Introduction Unlike SQL Server which, by default, relies on the 2PL (Two-Phase Locking) to implement the SQL standard isolation levels, Oracle, PostgreSQL, and MySQL InnoDB engine use MVCC (Multi-Version Concurrency Control). However, providing a truly Serializable isolation level on top of MVCC is really difficult, and, in this post, I’ll demonstrate that it’s very difficult … Continue reading A beginner’s guide to the Phantom Read anomaly, and how it differs between 2PL and MVCC →

MySQL Group Replication vs. Multi Source

In my previous post, we saw the usage of MySQL Group Replication (MGR) in single-primary mode. We know that Oracle does not recommends using MGR in multi-primary mode, but there is so much in the documentation and in presentations about MGR behavior in multi-primary, that I feel I should really give it a try, and especially compare this technology with the already existing multiple master solution introduced in 5.7: multi-source replication.

Installation

To this extent, I will set up two clusters using MySQL-Sandbox. The instructions for MGR in …

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MySQL 8.0 - auto increment feature gets fixed

How InnoDB initializes AUTO_INCREMENT counters is actually not a bug, but a documented mechanism. There were some complaints and even people who lost data over this. To initialize an auto-increment counter after a server restart, InnoDB executes the equivalent of the following statement on the first insert into a table containing an AUTO_INCREMENT column. SELECT MAX(ai_col) FROM table_name FOR

Introduction into storage engine troubleshooting: Q & A

In this blog, I will provide answers to the Q & A for the “Introduction into storage engine troubleshooting” webinar.

First, I want to thank everybody for attending the July 14 webinar. The recording and slides for the webinar are available here. Below is the list of your questions that I wasn’t able to answer during the webinar, with responses:

Q: At which isolation level do 

pt-online-schema-change

 and 

pt-archive

  copy data from a table?

A: Both tools do not change the server’s default transaction isolation level. Use either

REPEATABLE READ

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Q: Does MySQL support ACID? A: Yes

I was recently asked this question by an experienced academic at the NY Oracle Users Group event I presented at.

Does MySQL support ACID? (ACID is a set of properties essential for a relational database to perform transactions, i.e. a discrete unit of work.)

Yes, MySQL fully supports ACID, that is Atomicity, Consistency, Isolation and Duration. (*)

This is contrary to the first Google response found searching this question which for reference states “The standard table handler for MySQL is not ACID compliant because it doesn’t support consistency, isolation, or durability”.

The question is however not a simple Yes/No because it depends on timing …

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Configuring and testing MySQL binary log

The binary log contains “events” that describe database changes. On a basic installation with default options, it's not turned on. This log is essential for accommodating the possible following requirements:

Replication: the binary log on a master replication server provides a record of the data changes to be sent to slave servers. Point in Time recovery: allow to recover a database from a full

MySQL replication in action - Part 3: all-masters P2P topology

Previous episodes:

MySQL replication in action - Part 1: GTID & CoMySQL replication in action - Part 2 - Fan-in topology


In the previous article, we saw the basics of establishing replication from multiple origins to the same destination. By extending that concept, we can deploy more complex topologies, such as the point-to-point (P2P) all-masters topology, a robust and …

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Tracking MySQL query history in long running transactions

Long running transactions can be problematic for OLTP workloads, particularly where we would expect most to be completed in less than a second. In some cases a transaction staying open just a few seconds can cause behaviour that is entirely unexpected, with the developers at a loss as to why a transaction remained open. There are a number of ways to find long running transactions, luckily versions of MySQL from 5.6 onwards provide some very insightful instrumentation.

Here we will use the information_schema coupled with the …

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